amazon apple pay support

Recurly supports Amazon Pay in the United States, Europe region and the Note: Recurly's Amazon Pay integration does not currently support 3DS or PSD2. The watchdog ordered Apple to pay €134.5 million and e-commerce firm Amazon €68.7 million for infringing EU laws through restrictions which. With Amazon's adoption of its own payments system for the Amazon Prime integration with the Apple TV app, AirPlay 2 support, tvOS apps.

Amazon apple pay support -

Amazon Pay logo.

Enable a familiar, fast checkout for hundreds of millions of active Amazon customers globally

Overview

What is Amazon Pay? An end-to-end payment solution that gives hundreds of millions of active Amazon customers[1] a familiar, fast, and secure way to complete their purchase through your online store. Shoppers can use the address and payment information already stored in their Amazon account to check out – avoiding account creation or the need to re-enter their billing and shipping information. The performance is continually optimized by technology, learnings, and best practices from Amazon.

As earth’s most customer-centric company, we are continuously innovating on behalf of our customers. With 91% of Amazon Pay customers saying they would use Amazon Pay again and hundreds of millions of active Amazon customers already enabled for Amazon Pay, it can make it easier for you to deliver an improved customer experience online[2].

Key Features

  • PSD2 compliant: Built-in support for Strong Customer Authentication (SCA) as required under the Second Payment Services Directive (PSD2) in the European Economic Area (EEA).
  • Multi-currency: Maintain the local currency experience across the shopping journey and help customers avoid currency conversion fees from their credit card issuer or bank.
  • Recurring payment support forWooCommerce Subscriptions (separate purchase): available for USA, UK, Germany, France, Italy, Ireland, Spain, Luxembourg, Austria, Belgium, Cyprus, Netherlands, Sweden, Portugal, Hungary, Denmark and Japan.
  • Automatic Decline Handling: Reduce lost sales with a consistent experience for customers to gracefully recover from a declined payment.
  • Payment Protection Policy: Protection against fraud-related chargebacks[3].
  • Amazon Pay A-to-z Guarantee: Increase customer confidence to complete purchase in your online store with extra assurance on the timeliness of delivery and order quality[4]
.

Definitions

  • [1] Represents active Amazon customer accounts, 2020.
  • [2] Consumer Net Promoter Score (NPS) Surveys: Conducted by Amazon Pay in 2019 among US, UK, DE, FR, IT, and ES consumers who had used Amazon Pay in the 12 months preceding to the survey launch dates.
  • [3] Available for qualified physical goods purchases only.
  • [4]  For eligible transactions detailed on the Amazon Pay Customer Agreement.


Источник: https://woocommerce.com/products/pay-with-amazon/
  • With the new BitPay app, users can now use Apple Pay to make payments in Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies.
  • BitPay is planning to include support for Google Pay and Samsung Pay in the near future.

Though Apple has historically had something of a love-hate relationship with Bitcoin, the company seems to be slowly but surely coming to the conclusion that the cryptocurrency isn’t something it can realistically avoid or ignore.

As a recent example, users can now use Apple Pay to make payments in Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies, according to a recent press release from BitPay.

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BitPay itself is a digital wallet that can be used in conjunction with Apple Pay and the Apple Wallet app.

“We have thousands of BitPay Wallet app customers using the BitPay Card who are always looking for new places and ways to spend their crypto,” BitPay CEO Stephen Pair said. “Adding Apple Pay and soon Google and Samsung Pay makes it easy and convenient to use the BitPay Card in more places from day-to-day items to luxury purchases.”

The press release adds:

For power blockchain users, the BitPay Wallet app supports an array of options to buy and store crypto and make online payments. Users can instantly buy gift cards from hundreds of top retailers in store and online. The BitPay Card enables customers to instantly convert cryptocurrency into fiat currency, which is then loaded onto the card and can be spent anywhere Mastercard debit is accepted around the world. Customers can also use the cards online for purchases and to withdraw cash from ATMs.

The BitPay Wallet app supports Bitcoin, Bitcoin Cash, and Ether, as well as four dollar-pegged stablecoins, USDC, GUSD, PAX and BUSD.

BitPay’s news comes just a few days after RBC analyst Mitch Steves suggested Apple should purchase bitcoin and create a cryptocurrency exchange.  Steves believes that the cache associated with Apple’s security and software reliability could transform its foray into cryptocurrency into a $40 billion/year business.

“To put some numbers around this, Square generates ~$1.6B/qtr in bitcoin related revenue on an active install base that we estimate to be in the ~30M range,” Steves writes. “Apple’s install base is 1.5B and even if we assume only 200M users would transact, this is 6.66x larger than Square.”

It’s an intriguing concept, to be sure, but as we covered last week, the notion of Apple fully embracing cryptocurrency to the extent Steves suggests seems unlikely.

And while it’s nice that iOS users can now use Apple Pay for Bitcoin payments, the reality is that cryptocurrency didn’t exactly replace traditional forms of payment in the way many people anticipated a few years back.

A recent article titled The Bitcoin Dream Is Dead explains:

And yet the reality is that Bitcoin has never really functioned as a currency. Almost from the beginning, only a small percentage of Bitcoin transactions have been for actual goods and services — and of those, many have been for illicit goods and services, like drugs and online gambling. Most Bitcoin transactions have been trades: people simply buying and selling it. The blockchain analysis company Chainalysis, for instance, found that in the first four months of 2019, just 1.3% of total transactions involved merchants. And that trend has only accelerated as the value of Bitcoin has soared. Strikingly, despite the speculative fervor that has surrounded Bitcoin, the total number of transactions has risen only mildly over the past two years. And that number is so small relative to the total number of electronic bank and credit card transactions as to be barely worth mentioning.

Still, if there’s anything we’ve learned about cryptocurrency is that it’s largely unpredictable. That said, it will be interesting to see if Apple’s stance on cryptocurrency becomes more accommodating over the next few years.

A life long Mac user and Apple enthusiast, Yoni Heisler has been writing about Apple and the tech industry at large for over 6 years. His writing has appeared in Edible Apple, Network World, MacLife, Macworld UK, and most recently, TUAW. When not writing about and analyzing the latest happenings with Apple, Yoni enjoys catching Improv shows in Chicago, playing soccer, and cultivating new TV show addictions, the most recent examples being The Walking Dead and Broad City.

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Источник: https://bgr.com/tech/apple-pay-bitcoin-wallet-app-payments/

Why Amazon got out of the Apple App Store tax, and why other developers won’t

Apple and Amazon very, very quietly unveiled a monumental app deal this week, without fanfare or, sadly, much in the way of transparency. Out of nowhere, buttons to buy or rent movies appeared in the Amazon Prime Video app. It’s difficult to express how strange this is: for over a decade, Apple has stuck to the rule that all digital goods sold in iOS apps must use Apple’s payment methods, including Apple’s 30 percent cut.

Suddenly, that rule appears to apply to all developers except those who have the leverage to cut a special deal with Apple. That’s the most damning way of putting it and the truth is perhaps a bit more nuanced. But if you wanted to cast that nuance aside and rail against metaphorical smoke-filled rooms where giant companies cut deals that aren’t offered to anybody else, well, I wouldn’t argue with you too much.

I want to get into some of the details here — much of which is based more on reasonable assumption than confirmed information (see the note about transparency above). I think it’s interesting in its own right, but I also think it’s important context for the real question: what does this mean for everybody else in the App Store ecosystem? (I’ll disclose here that my wife works for Oculus on its app store, but I recuse myself from reporting on it so I have literally no idea what Oculus’ policies are.)

Apple provided us with a statement about the change. You may have read it already, but there’s enough detail in the wording to give us a fuller picture of what’s really going on. (An Amazon spokesperson confirmed the change and some of the features without giving a formal comment.)

Here’s Apple:

Apple has an established program for premium subscription video entertainment providers to offer a variety of customer benefits — including integration with the Apple TV app, AirPlay 2 support, tvOS apps, universal search, Siri support and, where applicable, single or zero sign-on. On qualifying premium video entertainment apps such as Prime Video, Altice One and Canal+, customers have the option to buy or rent movies and TV shows using the payment method tied to their existing video subscription.

There is quite a lot to unpack here.

Firstly, I just want to point out that Apple calls this an “established program,” one that already applied to those smaller cable companies. But it was completely new news to me and also to longtime Apple reporter Mark Gurman, who definitely would have remembered such a thing!

Anyway, you can suss out the outlines of the deal that was struck. Amazon gets buy buttons inside its app for current Prime Video subscribers, Apple gets Amazon’s complete and total participation in the Apple TV features it cares about the most. Instead of just being yet another icon in the home screen grid, Amazon’s services are now deeply integrated into the user experiences Apple wants to move everybody towards.

Nilay Patel made this point quite strongly in today’s Vergecast podcast — give it a listen. Apple has long wanted to make the TV app the primary interface on the Apple TV box, but it needs more services to integrate into that UI.

Apple also very much wants to get consumers to sign up for other channels like HBO or Cinemax through its Apple TV app. And that’s where the second Amazon concession comes in.

Over at Daring Fireball, John Gruber did the work of punching the subscribe and pay buttons on all the possible permutations of subscribing to Amazon Prime Video in and out of Apple’s TV app. What he discovered is something that isn’t mentioned in Apple’s statement: if you’re not already a Prime Video subscriber, the sign-up flow in Amazon’s app ends up getting routed through Apple’s payment system.

There are some hidden caveat words at the very end of the statement. I’ll just emphasize them here: “customers have the option to buy or rent movies and TV shows using the payment method tied to their existing video subscription.”

Which means that Apple is getting a cut of the new subscriptions that start in Amazon’s app. Perhaps it’s the standard 30 percent in the first year, 15 percent after that. Perhaps it’s something better. Bottom line, new customers have their payments routed through Apple, existing Prime customers don’t.

All of the above is why I’m comfortable saying that Amazon had leverage on Apple: Apple has clear incentives in the form of getting more participation in the Apple TV app and in getting a cut on the new subscribers it drives to Amazon. Amazon has the incentive of not paying more money to Apple.

Most of all, you can tell it’s about leverage simply because the Amazon Kindle app hasn’t changed. You can’t buy a Kindle book directly in the Kindle app, nor is Amazon even allowed to link to or even hint at the possibility that it has a whole damn Kindle store on its website where you can make one-click purchases.

Last but certainly not least, let us turn our attention to my favorite part of Apple’s statement, the one that defines what kind of companies are apparently able to get this sweetheart deal: “premium subscription video entertainment providers.”

Last time I checked, Netflix is a “premium subscription video entertainment provider.” Also, last time I checked it had zero interest in giving up its own UI just to have its shows mixed in with everybody else’s in the Apple TV app. Actually, I haven’t technically checked — but Nick Statt is doing so with Netflix and a whole host of other companies as I write these words. Keep an eye out for his report.

Take that phrase and add the word “games” to it and you’re pretty much describing Fortnite. Epic’s CEO Tim Sweeney has been incredibly outspoken about App Store taxes. He’s taken Fortnite off the Google Play Store and would dearly love to find a way to not have to give Apple a cut on iOS devices. Does he have a personal stake in that fight? Obviously. But he’s also one of a growing chorus of voices pushing back against the so-called “Apple Tax.”

When the Amazon news hit, the very first thing I wrote in our Slack was “Tim Sweeney is going to lose his shit.” Sweeney did not, but he did post a “congratulations” tweet so thick with schadenfreude you could wedge a Fortnite pickaxe into it.

Epic is not the only company pushing back against Apple’s App Store fees. Spotify has filed a formal antitrust complaint in the European Union. Apple’s pushback is that fewer than 0.5 percent of Spotify users are charged Apple’s 15-percent fee, but that argument disingenuously leaves out the fact that Spotify hasn’t offered a direct way to subscribe in its iOS app since 2016.

I recently rewatched the House Judiciary’s July 2019 hearing on “Online platforms and entrepreneurship” on C-Span (how I choose to spend my self-isolation is my business). In it, Apple’s corporate law & chief compliance officer Kyle Andeer repeated the claim about Spotify. He also pointed out that 84 percent of apps in the App Store pay nothing to Apple because they’re free and that a decade ago, app developers were paying quite a bit more than 30% to retail stores for the physical distribution of their goods. (The relevant question from Rep Jamie Raskin starts about 90 minutes in.)

All of these arguments are old hat. And though the Netflixes, Fortnites, and Spotifys of the world are surely vexed by Apple’s policies, I think that for many smaller developers the 30-percent fee is simply not at the top of their list of concerns. Higher priorities likely include prices being driven down, market dynamics being corrupted by free-to-play games, upgrades made difficult because of limited pricing models, review-bombing over subscription fees, and just making payroll.

If there’s a moral and rhetorical force behind my opening line about smoke-filled rooms, it’s this: developing mobile apps is hard and succeeding is even harder, but at least you could tell yourself that even gigantic companies like Amazon have to deal with the same rules you do. The question is whether Apple needs to be held to a standard of fairness and transparency for the app ecosystem it fully controls on iOS or not.

Because Apple has such strict control over what apps can appear on iOS, it bears a higher burden of responsibility to treat iOS developers fairly and consistently. Note I didn’t say “equally,” because it’s unrealistic to expect that a first-time dev could get the same accommodations as massive companies.

But if the rule is you pay Apple a 30-percent cut of your app’s cost unless Apple really needs something from you to bolster its own subscription business, that’s neither fair nor consistent. I asked Apple if there was something other developers could do to qualify for a deal that’s similar to what Amazon now has. The company referred me to its original statement.


Intel and Nvidia’s new lineup

Big news in laptop land: Intel and Nvidia dropped their new stuff on the world. I’m particularly interested to see how Intel’s 10th Gen chips stack up against AMD. Sadly, “10th Gen” isn’t a very descriptive term these days, what with the 10nm vs 14nm models and other complications in the roadmap. The chips we’re looking at today are for gaming laptops, mainly.

And so, there are also a handful of new gaming laptops. My favorite, in case you’re wondering, is Asus’. It’s not only a member of the Keyboard In The Front Club, I think it is now the president. It was voted into office by unanimous consent after showing that its bottom screen flips up. It’s ridiculous and I love it.

Intel’s new 10th Gen chips bring 5.0GHz clock speeds to gaming laptops.

Nvidia’s RTX Super GPUs for laptops have arrived — here’s where you’ll see them first.

MSI announces new laptops with Comet Lake H and new Nvidia GPUs.

Razer’s new Blade 15 has powerful specs and an improved keyboard.

Gigabyte’s latest gaming laptop supports Intel’s most powerful 10th Gen Core i9 processor yet.

Asus’ ROG Zephyrus Duo 15 is a gaming laptop with two screens.

Amazon’s inchoate pandemic responses

A little more than a week ago, Casey Newton called for a daily coronavirus briefing from Amazon. I agreed then and agree even more now, if only because it would be a forcing function for senior executives to present a coherent response strategy,

More than many companies, Amazon can make the case that it’s an essential businesses. And yet for all of the thinking, effort, robotics, and software that has gone into its warehouse logistics, precious little of that disciplined, organized approach is apparent in its efforts to protect the workers in those warehouses.

Yesterday, it belatedly did the right thing by pledging to provide temperature checks and masks in all warehouses. I also applaud the decision to stop selling N95 and surgical masks to the public and even the virtual SXSW film festival.

But at the same time, Amazon’s general counsel privately insulted a warehouse worker that had been fired. Amazon contends he had broken social distancing rules, but that doesn’t excuse the memo in the slightest. And then, as is his wont, Amazon SVP Jay Carney popped off on Twitter with the following, easily one of the top five self-owns in the history of corporate PR:

Indeed.

Meanwhile, though this next story isn’t technically, it’s certainly related. Jeff Bezos’ space company is pressuring employees to launch a tourist rocket during the pandemic. Loren Grush has the inside story on what’s going on at Blue Origin and their attitude to the pandemic seems really shortsighted to me. Which is ironic, given the company’s long-term vision of securing the future of humanity.

In a meeting with the New Shepard team on Wednesday, April 1st, Blue Origin leadership talked about ways to do a trip to Van Horn with a smaller group than usual and suggested that employees should keep a low profile while in town, according to a recording provided to The Verge. In the meeting, numerous employees voiced concerns about the trip, and one manager said there may be employment repercussions if they didn’t agree with management’s decisions.

“I would say that you should ask yourself, as an individual, are you acting as a toxin in the organization, fanning discontent, or are you really trying to help our senior leaders make better decisions?” Jeff Ashby, a senior mission assurance director at Blue Origin and a former NASA astronaut, said to employees during the meeting.

More from The Verge

Zoom freezes features to focus on security and privacy for its 200 million daily users. Given what I would characterize as a spotty history of responding to security concerns with the appropriate level of seriousness, I was pleasantly surprised to see Zoom rise to the occasion yesterday. It has already begun issuing fixes and it seems like there’s more to come.

Google donates free Chromebooks and 100,000 mobile hotspots for rural California students.

eBay is waiving seller fees for new businesses to help shuttered retailers move online.

The show must go on: here’s how Twitch streamers are handling quarantine. Bijan Stephen talks to a bunch of streamers as their numbers are ballooning:

Twitch is bigger than it’s ever been before. The site’s viewership increased a full 31 percent between March 8th and March 22nd, growing to 43 million hours watched from 33 million hours

Plastic bags are making a comeback because of COVID-19. A lot of stuff you used to take for granted, like that reusable bags are obviously better than disposable ones, is suddenly a lot more complicated. Justine Calma looks at one of those issues.

Like pretty much everything else right now, reusable bags should probably be handled more carefully to minimize the risk of transmitting disease to other people. At the same time, there has been no evidence so far that using reusable grocery bags have been responsible for spreading the novel coronavirus.

New York finally legalizes electric bikes and scooters. Good. As Andrew Hawkins notes, this rule disproportionately hurt delivery workers and was especially punishing for immigrants.

Spotify now works with Siri on the Apple Watch. This is nice, but Google and Amazon just let you pick your default music service.

In This Stream

Epic Games v. Apple: the fight for the future of the App Store

View all 105 stories Источник: https://www.theverge.com/2020/4/3/21206400/apple-tax-amazon-tv-prime-30-percent-developers

Enabling Amazon Pay

This page was printed on Nov 29, 2021. For the current version, visit https://help.shopify.com/en/manual/payments/accelerated-checkouts/amazon-pay.

Note

Amazon Pay is available to merchants located in specific countries and selling in USD, GBP, JPY, and EUR. For a list of supported countries, refer to Amazon Pay supported countries.

Amazon Pay is a fast, easy, and trusted way for your customers to make purchases on your online store by using payment and shipping information stored in their Amazon accounts. You keep full control of the customer relationship, and your product-level data is never captured or shared with Amazon. Learn more about secure checkouts from Amazon Pay.

Note

You're charged transaction fees each time a customer makes a purchase using this payment method, unless you also activate Shopify Payments.

Supported countries

To be eligible for Amazon Pay, your Shopify business must be based in one of the following countries:

  • United States
  • United Kingdom
  • Denmark
  • France
  • Germany
  • Hungary
  • Italy
  • Japan
  • Luxembourg
  • Netherlands
  • Portugal
  • Spain
  • Sweden

Note

Amazon Pay supports only USD, GBP, JPY, and EUR. Amazon Pay appears in the Payments section of your Shopify admin only if you are using a supported currency. Learn more about supported currencies for Amazon Pay from Amazon Pay Help.

Activate Amazon Pay

  1. From your Shopify admin, go to Settings > Payments.
  1. From the Shopify app, go to Store > Settings.
  2. Under Store settings, tap Payments.
  1. From the Shopify app, go to Store > Settings.
  2. Under Store settings, tap Payments.
  1. In the Amazon Pay section, click Activate Amazon Pay.

  2. Follow the instructions on the Amazon Pay website to create your account.

  3. If your Shopify store uses a custom primary domain, then add the homepage URL of your online store to your Amazon Pay Integration settings:

    1. In Amazon Seller Central, go to Integration > Integration Central.
    2. In the Manage client ID/store ID(s) section, click View client ID/store ID(s).
    3. From the App or store name drop-down menu, select your Shopify store, then click Edit.
    4. Add the complete homepage URL, such as , to Allowed JavaScript origins.
    5. Click Save changes.

After you agree to provide your Shopify store with access to your Amazon Payments merchant account, then Amazon Pay appears as an active payment provider on the Payments page in your Shopify admin.

Note

If Amazon Pay is not displaying properly on your online store, it is likely because you have made HTML/CSS customizations to the checkout that are not supported by Amazon Pay. Contact Shopify support for more information.

Customer experience

After you activate Amazon Pay, eligible customers can select Amazon Pay during checkout. The payment process is embedded into the checkout page by default so that your customers can complete their orders without having to leave your online store.

Note

If your store's theme displays buttons for your active payment providers, then the Amazon Pay button appears on your store's cart page instead of its checkout page.

Customers who select Amazon Pay can access the shipping address and payment information stored in their Amazon account to complete their purchase with an accelerated checkout. Their billing address remains private, and is not shared with Shopify. Learn more about accelerated checkouts.

Источник: https://help.shopify.com/en/manual/payments/accelerated-checkouts/amazon-pay

Apple’s IAP deal with Amazon and the beginning of a new era

Last week, Amazon’s Prime Video app on iOS began offering users the ability to purchase and rent video content via Amazon’s payment system, bypassing the iTunes in-app purchase payments process on iOS. This is an enormously significant development: Apple has historically exerted tight control over payments on iOS by forcing developers to use the iTunes IAP payments process that levies a 30% platform fee on all transactions.

Developers have begrudgingly paid the 30% tax on IAP transactions on both iOS and Google Play for years, but as a number of high profile developers began moving their app transactions to the web in order to avoid these platform fees, a sea change seemed imminent. Netflix and Spotify encourage users to transact on the web so as to avoid using the iTunes payments system; YouTube last month went so far as to cancel all active iTunes subscriptions to force those users to subscribe via the web.

But a web-based payments flow isn’t ideal; it’s a bad user experience (a user has to leave an app, open a mobile website, log into the service, and enter their credit card information), and it’s also simply inconsistently implemented across the iOS ecosystem. Apple has been engaged in a sort of cold war with very large companies that operate across many platforms — Spotify, Netflix, YouTube were able to get away with bypassing iTunes payment processing on mobile because they could always claim that users may have discovered their services on any number of platforms (desktop, connected TVs, etc.). But by tacitly accepting the web payments workaround, Apple signaled to developers that allowing for non-iTunes payments on iOS was inevitable. With Amazon’s adoption of its own payments system for the Amazon Prime iOS app, that moment is upon us.

John Gruber has an excellent overview of how the new Amazon Prime payments process works on iOS, but as a succinct overview:

  • Existing Prime account holders can now purchase and rent videos in the Prime iOS app via the Amazon payments process with the credit card attached to their Amazon account;
  • Anyone who upgrades to a Prime account via the iOS app still has to do so via iTunes payment processing, which means Apple takes their 30% / 15% cut of that subscription;
  • Users who subscribed to Prime via the iOS app will pay for any movies rented or purchased via the iTunes purchasing system.

Apple provided a statement about the new arrangement with Amazon to The Verge:

Apple has an established program for premium subscription video entertainment providers to offer a variety of customer benefits — including integration with the Apple TV app, AirPlay 2 support, tvOS apps, universal search, Siri support and, where applicable, single or zero sign-on. On qualifying premium video entertainment apps such as Prime Video, Altice One and Canal+, customers have the option to buy or rent movies and TV shows using the payment method tied to their existing video subscription.

Parsing this passage reveals some vital information:

  • Amazon is taking part in an apparently pre-existing program that also includes Altice One and Canal+;
  • In order to qualify for the program, Amazon had to integrate the Prime Video app with a number of other Apple’s features and services.

Given that this is an explicitly designated developer program, it stands to reason that participation isn’t open to the development community at large: it’s very likely that preferential payment terms were negotiated between Amazon and Apple in order to entice Amazon to cooperate.

Given that, one might wonder if this development is actually meaningful. That two of the world’s largest companies negotiated a mutually-beneficial commercial partnership within the context of a narrowly-scoped, invite-only developer program doesn’t have broad implications for the developer ecosystem. But I think the deal struck between Amazon and Apple reveals something very significant that will eventually impact the degree to which the iOS platform remains rigidly controlled by Apple: that pricing power has shifted from Apple to developers, and Apple no longer gets to set commercial terms.

I’ve long maintained that Apple can’t be classified as a monopoly because of the 30% platform fee or because it doesn’t allow third-party app stores within the iOS ecosystem. Monopolistic power is fundamentally related to the ability to be a price setter: to dictate prices because, through lack of competition, consumers have no choice but to purchase from a single firm. But in the case of smartphone apps, Apple doesn’t actually transact with end users — it merely operates a marketplace that connects app developers (sellers) with the people that own Apple hardware (buyers). Apple’s relationship with developers is that of an agent, and developers certainly have more options than just iOS in terms of distribution platforms for their apps. Apple doesn’t even have a majority of smartphone sales market share; how could it be a monopoly?

This price setting property is important when considering a monopoly. If Apple increased its platform fee to 40%, or 50%, what would happen — would all developers simply accept that? And if so: why isn’t it happening? In fact, the opposite is happening: Apple reduced its platform fee for year-2 subscriptions in June 2016 and Google followed suit for Android shortly thereafter in October 2016 (monopoly accusations aren’t leveled at Google over platform fees because Android allows developers to transact directly with users outside of Google Play). If Apple enjoyed monopoly pricing power, it wouldn’t be engaged in a slow-motion race to the bottom with a competitor that owns more marketshare than it does.

Some proponents of the Apple as monopoly worldview argue here that within the iOS ecosystem, Apple exists as a monopoly because it doesn’t allow for competing stores. This re-scoping of the situation blurs some logical lines (both consumers and developers still have choice: Android is larger than iOS!), but even putting that aside, Apple doesn’t qualify as a monopoly within this perspective because Apple doesn’t sell anything — it connects buyers and sellers as a marketplace operator. If anything, Apple in this case might be considered a monopsony, or a firm that enjoys exclusive buyer status: a monopsony is the only party to whom goods or services can be sold and can thus set prices in a way that maximizes its profit regardless of market forces.

But there’s no marginal cost of production for software, and given that Apple takes a percentage of in-app purchase revenues and not a fixed fee per purchase, both Apple and developers are incentivized to maximize revenue through appropriate pricing. This is the whole reason the freemium model rose to prominence on mobile in the first place: developers, not Apple, began reducing app prices until most settled at $0 simply because the competition for attention in the ever-crowding App Store was so ferocious. In fact, Apple seems to host a non-trivial amount of antipathy for the freemium model, as is evidenced with its Arcade product.

Coming back to Amazon: it is clear with this deal that turning a blind eye to the web payments workaround on iOS is ultimately leading to adoption of third-party payments. Far from being a monopoly, Apple is competing for users in a very crowded platforms marketplace: a tightly integrated system in which almost all participants not only operate platforms but also publish content on other companies’ platforms — a matrix of content stores and content.

The calculus that Apple is dealing with is: at what point does the total surface area of this matrix begin to influence the way Apple polices its own slice of the matrix? As consumers are presented with ever-increasing opportunities to consume their favorite content, when, for example, does the incremental value from offering frictionless access to Prime Video content on iOS outweigh the incremental revenue from 30% of a poorly-integrated Amazon Prime on iOS?

Obviously that decision isn’t restricted exclusively to Amazon Prime: Apple will have to begin to decide how this matrix, which represents consumer choice and optionality, will influence the freedom to which it allows developers to operate on iOS. But a decision like the one that Apple made with Amazon seems unlikely to not cascade out to other developers into a more comprehensive platform policy.

Photo by Arnel Hasanovic on Unsplash

Источник: https://mobiledevmemo.com/apples-iap-deal-with-amazon-and-the-beginning-of-a-new-era/

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Accepted payment methods

Support

Common searches: registration, documentation, and what should I do?

Menu

Amazon Pay accepts the following payment methods

  • Credit card currently accepted include Visa*, MasterCard, and American Express.
  • Debit card currently accepted include Visa Electron, Delta, and Maestro.
  • Direct debit. If you have a valid bank account within a country that participates in SEPA direct debit, you can pay by direct debit in the currency EUR.

SEPA countries that accept transactions in euros:

Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta Monaco, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom.

For more information about the SEPA countries, see Single euro payments area (SEPA).

Notes:

  • In some circumstances, you might be limited to using Visa and Mastercard credit cards. In those cases, the checkout process will make that clear and will let huntington mortgage payoff add one of those payment methods.
  • Note that Amazon Gift Cards** cannot be used as a payment method to place an order using Amazon Pay. Amazon Gift Cards can only be redeemed towards the purchase of eligible products at the relevant Amazon website (www.amazon.co.uk, www.amazon.de, www.amazon.fr, www.amazon.it, and www.amazon.es).

* Starting January 19, 2022, we will no longer accept UK-issued Visa credit cards for purchases on Amazon.co.uk. Your UK-issued Visa credit card can still sit in your wallet, and you can continue to use it when you check out with Amazon Pay on other sites now and after the above change is implemented. However, we encourage you to add a new debit card (including Visa debit cards) or non-Visa credit card like Mastercard, Amex, or Eurocard to your Amazon.co.uk account.

** Meaning Amazon.co.uk, Amazon.de, Amazon.fr, Amazon.it and Amazon.es Gift Cards. For complete terms and conditions, see UK - Gift Card, DE - Geschenkgutscheine, FR - Chèque Cadeau, IT - Buoni Regalo, and ES - Cheque Regalo, respectively.

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Источник: https://pay.amazon.co.uk/help/201754650

7 Brands Discuss the Benefits of the New Cashless Economy and Apple Pay’s Growing Ubiquity

Technology is are there any us banks open today how money moves.

From crypto-currencies to peer-topper payments and one-click checkouts, modern innovations are shifting the basic payment infrastructure of our economy.

The gadget we carry in our pockets is becoming more than ever thought possible. And the wallet is its next target.

Adii Pienaar, Founder of Conversio and WooThemes (later acquired by WooCommerce), sums this up best:

Customers worldwide are using their mobile devices for online shopping more often.

Depending on who you want to believe, it’s estimated that since late-2014 more than 50% of all online purchases are made from mobile devices. Apple / iOS has about a 15% market share of mobile devices, which is a huge potential user base for Apple Pay.

The attraction of Apple Pay is the convenience of already having your credit card details on your device. Your customers are also already familiar with spending money on their Apple devices (even if it’s just via iTunes or the App Store).

In general, there’s a trend where customers are spending more dollars when they can act impulsively and with a low-level of friction.

Think about how easy Amazon makes this with their 1-Click Purchases.

From a historical standpoint, Apple Pay, was announced in 2014. But it wasn’t the first of its kind.

The Evolution of Mobile Payments:

A brief history of mobile payments, according to TechCrunch:

  • 1983: David Chaum, an American cryptographer, starts work on creating digital cash by inventing “the blinding formula, which is an extension of the RSA algorithm still used in the web’s encryption.” This is the beginning of cryptocurrencies.

  • 1994: Although this is disputed, some believe one main financial loan requirements the first online purchase, a pepperoni and mushroom pizza from Pizza Hut, occurs in this year.

  • 1998: PayPal is founded.

  • 1999: Thanks to Ericsson and Telnor Mobil, mobile phones could be used to purchase movie tickets.

  • 2003: 95 million cell phone users worldwide made a purchase via their mobile device.

  • 2007: Both the iPhone and the Droid operating system are released.

  • 2008: Bitcoin is invented.

  • 2011: Google Wallet is released.

  • 2014: Apple Pay is launched, followed a year later by Android and Samsung Pay.

  • 2020: 90% of smartphone users will have made a mobile payment. 


At the time of Apple Pay’s release (years following Google’s own Wallet application), Apple CEO Tim Cook described the magnetic stripe card payment process as broken for its reliance on plastic cards’:

  • Outdated and vulnerable magnetic interface

  • Exposed numbers

  • Insecure security codes


Since then, the same technology Apple uses for Apple Pay has become ubiquitous worldwide: EMV, a payment tokenization specification.

It is why your credit card has a chip in it.

Still, digital payment methods remain more secure than physical cards. They can’t be stolen, for one.

“Payments like Apple Pay are the the most secure payment method out there. Apple Pay contains multiple layers of dynamic encryption and is also protected by TouchID, Apple’s fingerprint technology,” says Jennifer Pollock, Content Marketing Editorial Lead, Square.

But digital payment methods like Apple Pay have another upside: emerging generations with cash flow and raised on cell phones prefer them.

From a study conducted by The Washington Post.

And by 2030, those surveyed expect digital wallets to be the primary source of payments.

“Obviously, consumers are nervous about credit card security so offering the many payment choices is a good idea. Apple Pay means they don’t even have to pull out their credit card at a register,” says Rieva Lesonsky, CEO, SmallBizDaily.com.

To see how these trends are vying in 2020, I’ve interviewed 7 BigCommerce brands using the technology to understand their use case, their data and thoughts.

These two questions reigned supreme:

  1. Are people using Apple Pay?

  2. Would you recommend Apple Pay?


Here’s how their experience shook out.

SerengeTee Targets Its College-Aged Audience

Experience SerengeTee’s site.

Why did you add the Apple Pay button?

We amazon apple pay support a young demographic made up of high school and college students. We’ve noticed a spike in mobile usage so this made all the sense in the world.

It makes the checkout process incredibly easy.

How was the implementation process?

Not bad at all. We had our developer do some simple styling, but that was about it.

Can you quantify the results?

We are continuing to see more and more users using mobile and fewer bounces in our cart. We can’t quantify Apple Pay effectiveness just yet, but we think that’s a helpful piece of the puzzle.

Would you recommend Apple Pay?

Absolutely, especially if the analytics are showing high mobile and iPhone usage.

Apple Pay is a solution to those low mobile conversions.

Typing in address and credit card info is an awful experience on desktop, never mind mobile devices. Add to that the fact that most people are on the go while using their mobile device and it’s not hard to understand why mobile conversions remain so low.

Adding Apple Pay gives your customers a frictionless way to instantly make a purchase without thinking twice about it.

– Richard Lazazzera, Founder, A Better Lemonade Stand

Spearmint LOVE Sees Mobile Orders Take Off

Experience SpearmintLOVE’s site.

Why did you add the Apple Pay button?

Our traffic is now over 80% mobile. Any technology that improves the user experience for mobile users is something we consider testing.

Apple Pay makes the checkout process seamless and improves conversion.

How was the implementation process?

Like most native features on BigCommerce, implementation was easy. It took less than 10 minutes and required no developer time.

How has the button been working?

Our customers love it and we have had no technical issues since we implemented Apple Pay.  It is a core part of our mobile checkout process.

Would you recommend Apple Pay?

Yes, if you have high mobile traffic it is a must have feature.

One Click to One-Touch Checkout

Around 68% of all shopping carts are abandoned, and complicated checkouts are a major factor.

The Apple Pay integration streamlines the checkout process, increases security and decreases cart abandonment for mobile and desktop shoppers.

Plus, integration is a breeze. 

Activate Apple Pay Now.

CocoWeb Increases Conversion Rate 15% Across Devices

Experience CocoWeb’s site.

Why did you add the Apple Pay button?

As a small ecommerce business, we feel the brand of “Apple Pay” will surely help our credibility as our customers checkout.

Needless to say, we also believed that the technology and user base would help us increase conversions.

How was the implementation process?

BigCommerce had been amazing in providing the support and technology for a smooth implementation process.

It literally took us less than an hour to implement and fully test Apple Pay on our website.

How has the button been working?

It has worked wonderfully.

In particular, it has help us increase our mobile conversion by more than 20% and our desktop by 15%.

Zin Home Grows Mobile Sales 20%, AOV 10%

Experience ZinHome’s site.

Why did you add the Apple Pay button?

We added the Apple Pay button to allow customers a better, and more convenient, purchasing option.

We had noticed an increase in sales from mobile devices, and knew that by providing apple pay as an option, it would only increase them further.

How was the implementation process?

The implementation process was quite simple. When we switched to Paypal Braintree, and with the BigCommerce platform, it was as simple as flicking a switch to implement Apple Pay.

It couldn’t have been simpler.

How has the button been working?

Since implementing Apple Pay, we have seen a steady increase in the number of sales in which customers have selected it as their payment option.

We also know that as more people grow accustomed to using it, they will expect to find it on all online retailers as an option.

For us, providing that kind of ease of use, and the added security it gives our customers, is an important element of having an ecommerce business.

Can you quantify the results?

In the time since we implemented Apple Pay, we have seen a 10-20% increase in sales on mobile devices.

In addition, it should also be noted that there has been a decrease in abandoned orders that had been started on a mobile device.

Although we did not expect it to be impacted by the implementation, we have also seen an 5-10% increase in AOV on mobile orders.

Would you recommend Apple Pay?

The answer is a simple one — we would absolutely recommend Apply Pay to other online stores.

The demand for such convenience is only going to grow, and the ease of implementation makes it a simple task to complete.

In addition, our increase in AOV and conversion rate are a testament to the smooth, seamless shopping experience that Apple Pay provides.

Less Mobile Abandoned Cart

One of the major hindrances to mobile buying has always been the checkout.

It’s easy to browse, it’s easy to add-to-cart, but the checkout process has always been cumbersome on mobile. Apple Pay streamlines the checkout and makes it easier.

Amazon apple pay support Burt, Founder & CEO, Blue Stout


Natomounts Eliminates Chargebacks with Apple Pay

Experience NatoMounts site.

Why did you add the Apple Pay button?

From a text to a call or even an Instagram notification, just about anything can take a visitor from our website.

We wanted to add a payment option that would allow someone to check out in seconds, so they can get back to whatever they were doing before linking to our site.

How was the implementation process?

Easier than I expected. BigCommerce and Stripe’s integration made it so we were up and running in literally minutes.

How has the button been working?

The integration has been working flawlessly and chargebacks for that card-type are practically non-existent.

Would you recommend Apple Pay?

Implementing Apple Pay has only helped our website conversions, bounce rates, checkout process, and chargebacks.

I have yet to see a downside to enabling one of the easiest checkout processes we’ve ever implemented on our website.

Apple Pay is truly frictionless commerce.

Apple Pay is truly frictionless commerce geared to increasing mobile transactions.

My advice to amazon apple pay support would be to run a thorough mobile UX audit and deliver a truly mobile first user experience to shoppers and customers.

Now that the mobile checkout has been more or less ‘fixed’ with Apple Pay (with Android Pay to follow), mobile devices will becoming the primary de facto online shopping device.

– Kunle Campbell, Founder, 2X Ecommerce

See how Natomounts created a mobile-first experience.

Giant Teddy Sees Faster Checkout, Higher Conversions

Experience Amazon apple pay support Teddy’s site. 

Why did you integrate the Apple Pay?

We decided to add the Apple Pay button due to the smooth transition offered during the checkout process.

Customers are now able to quickly proceed to check out and pay for their desired item – much more quickly than pulling out a credit card.

Apple Pay already has their billing, shipping and contact information saved to avoiding having to re-enter. This leads to easier navigation for our customers.

Can you quantify the results?

We have seen an overall increase in conversion since adding the Apple Pay button along with a few other additions were made to the zions bank lobby hours can’t say for certain it was the Apple Pay button, but it certainly helps.

Would you recommend Apple Pay?

We would definitely recommend Apple Pay to other amazon apple pay support for many reasons.

The biggest one is the security and safety it brings to the customers at checkout, especially for smaller businesses.

The button allows a business to offer a very fast and efficient payment method. It also is great for mobile users. So many people are already on their phone so much, so paying with it just makes it that much more convenient.

Speed + Trust

Speed and trust: the less info you need a consumer to enter on your site, the more likely it is that they will complete the transaction with you.

Services like Apple Pay help take that mental roadblock of manually giving you their credit card info out of the equation. Really, it is all about convenience.

– Chris Van Dussen, CEO, Parcon Media 


Nine Line Processes +600 Sales Immediately Through Apple Pay

Experience Nine Line’s site.

Why did you add the Apple Pay button?

Apple Pay has become increasingly popular over the years.

Offering new ways for our users to checkout allows us to stay ahead of the curve.

Since 80% of our traffic is mobile or tablet, it made sense to offer payment options that are baked into those devices.

We really want to offer our users the ability to check out faster without too much manual input. Apple Pay offers a much more speedy checkout process.

How was the implementation process?

The implementation process was pretty straightforward. We were able to get the payment method live in under an hour.

All we had to do was enable the feature and do some minor HTML adjustments to our checkout.

The implementation is incredible easy and can be integrated without a developer.

Can you quantify the results?

In amazon apple pay support, we’ve captured over 600 sales with Apple Pay. It has made up 2.5% of our orders in 2018 and we expect that number to increase as Apple Pay becomes more popular.

Would you recommend Apple Pay?

I would highly recommend implementing Apple Pay.

For a successful ecommerce strategy, implementing multiple payment methods allows you to capture more orders and streamline the customer journey.

We’ve noticed a huge spike in our mobile traffic, and implementing features such as Apple Pay only enhance that experience.

Because of the easy implementation and low risk, there is no reason not to offer this option.  

More Options, More Sales

Every time you add a payment solution, you make it easier for a related customer segment to where is first national bank located and improve their conversion rates.

If you offer an impulse buy product, have a lot of mobile shoppers, or have items with lower AOVs, the Apple Pay user segment is probably not insignificant.

Go get them!

– Drew Sanocki, Private Equity Operating Partner, Empire Growth Group


Raney’s Keeps Up with Payment Trends with Apple Pay

Browse Raney’s website.

Why did you add the Apple Pay button?

When we saw that BigCommerce was releasing a seamless plug and play option to add ApplePay to our  store, it was a no brainer. 

Mobile is the future and this eliminates pain points for customers. 

It gets us closer to competing with Amazon’s one touch payment as well.  They are on everyone’s radar and it is important to keep up with them.

How was amazon apple pay support implementation process?

Extremely easy.  If I remember correctly, we were up the day it was released and it took less than an hour to set up.

Can you quantify the results?

The percentage of our customers that use Apple Pay right now is too small in comparison to other checkout methods to quantify any changes in AOV or conversion rate. 

We have received feedback from customers though that they are happy we have it and has improved their shopping experience.

Would you recommend Apple Pay?

Absolutely. BigCommerce makes it very easy to setup and it is free.

Why would you not add something to your store for free that makes your customers happy?

One Click to One-Touch Checkout

Around 68% of all shopping carts are abandoned, and complicated checkouts are a amazon apple pay support factor.

The Apple Pay integration streamlines the checkout process, increases security and decreases cart fulton ny weather 10 day for mobile and desktop shoppers.

Plus, integration is a breeze. 

Activate Apple Pay Now.

Источник: https://www.bigcommerce.com/blog/apple-pay-tips-mobile-payments/

Why Amazon got out of the Apple App Store tax, and why other developers won’t

Apple and Amazon very, very quietly unveiled a monumental app deal this week, without fanfare or, sadly, much in the way of transparency. Out of nowhere, buttons to buy or rent movies appeared in the Amazon Prime Video app. It’s difficult to express how strange this is: for over a decade, Apple has stuck to the rule that all digital goods sold in iOS apps must use Apple’s payment methods, including Apple’s 30 percent cut.

Suddenly, that rule appears to apply to all developers except those who have the leverage to cut a special deal with Apple. That’s the most damning way of putting it and the truth is perhaps a bit more nuanced. But if you wanted to cast that nuance aside and rail against metaphorical smoke-filled rooms where giant companies cut deals that aren’t offered to anybody else, well, I wouldn’t argue with you too much.

I want to get into some of the details here — much of which is based more on reasonable assumption than confirmed information (see the note about transparency above). I think it’s interesting in its own right, but I also amazon apple pay support it’s important context for the real question: what does this mean for everybody else in the App Store ecosystem? (I’ll disclose here that my wife works for Oculus on its app store, but I recuse myself from reporting on it so I have literally no idea what Oculus’ policies are.)

Apple provided us with a statement about the change. You may have read it already, but there’s enough detail in the wording to give us a fuller picture of what’s really going on. (An Amazon spokesperson confirmed the change and some of the features without giving a formal comment.)

Here’s Apple:

Apple has an established program for premium subscription video entertainment providers to offer a variety of customer benefits — including integration with the Apple TV app, AirPlay 2 support, tvOS apps, universal search, Siri support and, where applicable, single or zero sign-on. On qualifying premium video entertainment apps such as Prime Video, Altice One and Canal+, customers have the option to buy or rent movies and TV shows using the payment method tied to their existing video subscription.

There is quite a lot to unpack here.

Firstly, I just want to point out that Apple calls this an “established program,” one that already applied to those smaller cable companies. But it was completely new news to me and also to longtime Apple reporter Mark Gurman, who definitely would have remembered such a thing!

Anyway, you can suss out the outlines of the deal that was struck. Amazon gets buy buttons inside its app for current Prime Video subscribers, Apple gets Amazon’s complete and total participation in the Apple TV features it cares about the most. Instead of just being yet another icon in the home screen grid, Amazon’s services are now deeply integrated into the user experiences Apple wants to move everybody towards.

Nilay Patel made this point quite strongly in today’s Vergecast podcast — give it a listen. Apple has long wanted to make the TV app the primary interface on the Apple TV box, but it needs more services to integrate into that UI.

Apple also very much wants to get consumers to sign up for other channels like HBO or Cinemax through its Apple TV app. And that’s where the second Amazon concession comes in.

Over at Daring Fireball, John Gruber did the work of punching the subscribe and pay buttons on all the possible permutations of subscribing to Amazon Prime Video in and out of Apple’s TV app. What he discovered is something that isn’t mentioned in Apple’s statement: if you’re not already a Prime Video subscriber, the sign-up flow in Amazon’s app ends up getting routed through Apple’s payment system.

There are some hidden caveat words at the very end of the statement. I’ll just emphasize them here: “customers have the option to buy or rent movies and TV shows using the payment method tied to their existing video subscription.”

Which means that Apple is getting a cut of the new subscriptions that start in Amazon’s app. Perhaps it’s the standard 30 percent in the first year, 15 percent after that. Perhaps it’s something better. Bottom line, new customers have their payments routed through Apple, existing Prime customers don’t.

All of the above is why I’m comfortable saying that Amazon had leverage on Apple: Apple has clear incentives in the form of getting more participation in the Apple TV app and in getting a cut on the new subscribers it drives to Amazon. Amazon has the incentive of not paying more money to Apple.

Most of all, you can tell it’s about leverage simply because the Amazon Kindle app hasn’t changed. You can’t buy a Kindle book directly in the Kindle app, nor is Amazon even allowed to link to or even hint at the possibility that it has a whole damn Kindle store on its website where you can make one-click purchases.

Last but certainly not least, let us turn our attention to my favorite part of Apple’s statement, the one that defines what kind of companies are apparently able to get this sweetheart deal: “premium subscription video entertainment providers.”

Last time I checked, Netflix is a “premium subscription video entertainment provider.” Also, last time I checked it had zero interest in giving up its own UI just to have its shows mixed in with everybody else’s in the Apple TV app. Actually, I haven’t technically checked — but Nick Statt is doing so with Netflix and a whole host of other companies as I write these words. Keep an eye out for his report.

Take that phrase and add the word “games” to it and you’re pretty much describing Fortnite. Epic’s CEO Tim Sweeney has been incredibly outspoken about App Store taxes. He’s taken Fortnite off the Google Play Store and would dearly love to find a way to not have to give Apple a cut on iOS devices. Does he have a personal stake in that fight? Obviously. But he’s also one of a growing chorus of voices pushing back against the so-called “Apple Tax.”

When the Amazon news hit, the very first thing I wrote in our Slack was “Tim Sweeney is going to lose his shit.” Sweeney did not, but he did post a “congratulations” tweet so thick with schadenfreude you could wedge a Fortnite pickaxe into it.

Epic is not the only company pushing back against Apple’s App Store fees. Spotify has filed a formal antitrust complaint in the European Union. Apple’s pushback is that fewer than 0.5 percent of Spotify users are charged Apple’s 15-percent fee, but that argument disingenuously leaves out the fact that Spotify hasn’t offered a direct way to subscribe in its iOS app since 2016.

I recently rewatched the House Judiciary’s July 2019 hearing on “Online platforms and entrepreneurship” on C-Span (how I choose to spend my self-isolation is my business). In it, Apple’s corporate law & chief compliance officer Kyle Andeer repeated the claim about Spotify. He also pointed out that 84 percent of apps in the App Store pay nothing to Apple because they’re free and that a decade ago, app developers were paying quite a bit more than 30% to retail stores for the physical distribution of their goods. (The relevant question from Rep Jamie Raskin starts about 90 minutes in.)

All of these arguments are old hat. And though the Netflixes, Fortnites, and Spotifys of the world are surely vexed by Apple’s policies, I think that for many smaller developers the 30-percent fee is simply not at the top of their list of concerns. Higher priorities likely include prices being driven down, market dynamics being corrupted by free-to-play games, upgrades made difficult because of limited pricing models, review-bombing over subscription fees, and just making payroll.

If there’s a moral and rhetorical force behind my opening line about smoke-filled rooms, it’s this: developing mobile apps is hard and succeeding is even harder, but at least you could tell yourself that even gigantic companies like Amazon have to deal with the same rules you do. The question is whether Apple needs to be held to a standard amazon apple pay support fairness and transparency for the app ecosystem it fully controls on iOS or not.

Because Apple has such strict control over what apps can appear on iOS, it bears a higher burden of responsibility to treat iOS developers fairly and consistently. Note I didn’t say “equally,” because it’s unrealistic to expect that a first-time dev could get the same accommodations as massive companies.

But if the rule is you pay Apple a 30-percent cut of your app’s cost unless Apple really needs something from you to bolster its own subscription business, that’s neither fair nor consistent. I asked Apple if there was something other developers could do to qualify for a deal that’s similar to what Amazon now has. The company referred me to its original statement.


Intel and Nvidia’s new lineup

Big news in laptop land: Intel and Nvidia dropped their new stuff on the world. I’m particularly interested to see how Intel’s 10th Gen chips stack up against AMD. Sadly, “10th Gen” isn’t a very descriptive term these days, what with the 10nm vs 14nm models and other complications in the roadmap. The chips we’re looking at today are for gaming laptops, mainly.

And so, there are also a handful of new gaming laptops. My favorite, in case you’re wondering, is Asus’. It’s not only a member of the Keyboard In The Front Club, I think it is now the president. It was voted into office by unanimous consent after showing that its bottom screen flips up. It’s ridiculous and I love it.

Intel’s new 10th Gen chips bring 5.0GHz clock speeds to gaming laptops.

Nvidia’s RTX Super GPUs for laptops have arrived — here’s where you’ll see them first.

MSI announces new laptops with Comet Lake H and new Nvidia GPUs.

Razer’s new Blade 15 has powerful specs and an improved keyboard.

Gigabyte’s latest gaming laptop supports Intel’s most powerful 10th Gen Core i9 processor yet.

Asus’ ROG Zephyrus Duo 15 is a gaming laptop with two screens.

Amazon’s inchoate pandemic nearest dollar bank little more than a week ago, Casey Newton called for a daily coronavirus briefing from Amazon. I agreed then and agree even more now, if only because it would be a forcing function for senior executives to present a coherent response strategy,

More than many companies, Amazon can make the case that it’s an essential businesses. And yet for all of the thinking, effort, robotics, and software that has gone into its warehouse logistics, precious little of that disciplined, organized approach is apparent in its efforts to protect the workers in those warehouses.

Yesterday, it belatedly did the right thing by pledging to provide temperature checks and masks in all warehouses. I also applaud the decision to stop selling N95 and surgical masks to the public and even the virtual SXSW film festival.

But at the same time, Amazon’s general counsel privately insulted a warehouse worker that had been fired. Amazon contends he had broken social distancing rules, but that doesn’t excuse the memo in the slightest. And then, as is his wont, Amazon SVP Jay Carney popped off on Twitter with the following, easily one of the top five self-owns in the history of corporate PR:

Indeed.

Meanwhile, though this next story isn’t technically, it’s certainly related. Jeff Bezos’ space company is pressuring employees to launch a tourist rocket during the pandemic. Loren Grush has the inside story on what’s going on at Blue Origin and their attitude to the pandemic seems really shortsighted to me. Which is ironic, given the company’s long-term vision of securing the future of humanity.

In a meeting with the New Shepard team on Wednesday, April 1st, Blue Origin leadership talked about ways to do a trip to Van Horn with a smaller group than usual and suggested that employees should keep a low profile while in town, according to a recording provided to The Verge. In the meeting, numerous employees voiced concerns about the trip, and one manager said there may be employment repercussions if they didn’t agree with management’s decisions.

“I would say that you should ask yourself, as an individual, are you acting as a toxin in the organization, fanning discontent, or are you really trying to help our senior leaders make better decisions?” Jeff Ashby, a senior mission assurance director at Blue Origin and capital one auto finance payoff department address former NASA astronaut, said to employees during the meeting.

More from The Verge

Zoom freezes features to focus on security and privacy for its 200 million daily users. Given what I would characterize as a spotty history of responding to security concerns with the appropriate level of seriousness, I was pleasantly surprised to see Zoom rise to the occasion yesterday. It has already begun issuing fixes and it seems like there’s more to come.

Google donates free Chromebooks and 100,000 mobile hotspots for rural California students.

eBay is waiving seller fees for new businesses to help shuttered retailers move online.

The show must go on: here’s how Twitch streamers are handling quarantine. Bijan Stephen talks to a bunch of streamers as their numbers are ballooning:

Twitch is bigger than it’s ever been before. The site’s viewership increased a full 31 percent between March 8th and March 22nd, growing to 43 million hours watched from 33 million hours

Plastic bags are making a comeback because of COVID-19. A lot of stuff you used to take for granted, like that reusable bags are obviously better than disposable ones, is suddenly a lot more complicated. Justine Calma looks at one of those issues.

Like pretty much everything else right now, reusable bags should probably be handled more carefully to minimize the risk of transmitting disease to other people. At the same time, there has been no evidence so far that using reusable grocery bags have been responsible for spreading the novel coronavirus.

New York finally legalizes electric bikes and scooters. Good. As Andrew Hawkins notes, this rule disproportionately hurt delivery workers and was especially punishing for immigrants.

Spotify now works with Siri on the Apple Watch. This is nice, but Google and Amazon just let you pick your default music service.

In This Stream

Epic Games v. Apple: the fight for the future of the App Store

View all 105 stories Источник: https://www.theverge.com/2020/4/3/21206400/apple-tax-amazon-tv-prime-30-percent-developers

Apple’s IAP deal with Amazon and the beginning of a new era

Last week, Amazon’s Prime Video app on iOS began offering users the ability to purchase and rent video content via Amazon’s payment system, bypassing the iTunes in-app purchase payments process on iOS. This is an enormously significant development: Apple has historically exerted tight control over payments on iOS by forcing developers to use the iTunes IAP payments process that levies a 30% platform fee on all transactions.

Developers have begrudgingly paid the 30% tax on IAP transactions on both iOS and Google Play for years, but as a number of high profile developers began moving their app transactions to the web in order to avoid these platform fees, a sea change seemed imminent. Netflix and Spotify encourage users to transact on the web so as to avoid using the iTunes payments system; YouTube last month went so far as to cancel all active iTunes subscriptions to force those users to subscribe via the web.

But a web-based payments is peanut butter and banana toast good for you isn’t ideal; it’s a bad user experience (a user has to leave an app, open a mobile website, log into the service, and enter their credit card information), and it’s also simply inconsistently implemented across the iOS ecosystem. Apple has been engaged in a sort is muscle milk bad for you cold war with very large companies that operate across many platforms — Spotify, Netflix, YouTube were able to get away with bypassing iTunes payment processing on mobile because they could always claim that users may have discovered their services on any number of platforms (desktop, connected TVs, etc.). But by tacitly accepting the web payments workaround, Apple signaled to developers that allowing for non-iTunes payments on iOS was inevitable. With Amazon’s adoption amazon apple pay support its own payments system for the Amazon Prime iOS app, that moment is upon us.

John Gruber has an excellent overview of how the new Amazon Prime payments process works on iOS, but as a succinct overview:

  • Existing Prime account holders can now purchase and rent videos in the Prime iOS app via the Amazon payments process with the credit card attached to their Amazon account;
  • Anyone who upgrades to a Meredith village savings bank alton nh account via the iOS app still has to do so via iTunes payment processing, which means Apple takes their 30% / 15% cut of that subscription;
  • Users who subscribed to Prime via the iOS app will pay for any movies rented or purchased via the iTunes purchasing system.

Apple provided a statement about the new arrangement with Amazon to The Verge:

Apple has an established program for premium subscription video entertainment providers to offer a variety of customer benefits — including integration with the Apple TV app, AirPlay 2 support, tvOS apps, universal search, Siri support and, where applicable, single or zero sign-on. On qualifying premium video entertainment apps such as Prime Video, Altice One and Canal+, customers have the option to buy or rent movies and TV shows using the payment method tied to their existing video subscription.

Parsing this passage reveals some vital information:

  • Amazon is taking part in an apparently pre-existing program that also includes Altice One and Canal+;
  • In order to qualify for the program, Amazon had to integrate the Prime Video app with a number of other Apple’s features and services.

Given that this is an explicitly designated developer program, it stands to reason that participation isn’t open to the development community at large: it’s very likely that preferential payment terms were negotiated between Amazon and Apple in order to entice Amazon to cooperate.

Given that, one might wonder if this development is actually meaningful. That two of the world’s largest companies negotiated a mutually-beneficial commercial partnership within the context of a narrowly-scoped, invite-only developer program doesn’t have broad implications for the developer ecosystem. But I think the deal struck between Amazon and Apple reveals something very significant that will eventually impact the degree to which the iOS platform remains rigidly controlled by Apple: that pricing power has shifted from Apple to developers, and Apple no longer gets to set commercial terms.

I’ve long maintained that Apple can’t be classified as a monopoly because of the 30% platform fee or because it doesn’t allow third-party app stores within the iOS ecosystem. Monopolistic power is fundamentally related to the ability to be a price setter: to dictate prices because, through lack of competition, consumers have no choice but to purchase from a single firm. But in the case of smartphone apps, Apple doesn’t actually transact with end users — it merely operates a marketplace that connects app developers (sellers) with the people that own Apple hardware (buyers). Apple’s relationship with developers is that of an agent, and developers certainly have more options than just iOS in terms of distribution platforms for their apps. Apple doesn’t even have a majority of smartphone sales market share; how could it be a monopoly?

This price setting property is important when considering a monopoly. If Apple increased its platform fee to 40%, or 50%, what would happen — would all developers simply accept that? And if so: why isn’t it happening? In fact, the opposite is happening: Apple reduced its platform fee for year-2 subscriptions in June 2016 and Google followed suit for Android shortly thereafter in October 2016 (monopoly accusations aren’t leveled at Google over platform fees because Android allows developers to transact directly with users outside of Google Play). If Apple enjoyed monopoly pricing power, it wouldn’t be engaged in a slow-motion race to the bottom with a competitor that owns more marketshare than it does.

Some proponents of the Apple as monopoly worldview argue here that within the iOS ecosystem, Apple exists as a monopoly because it doesn’t allow for competing stores. This re-scoping of the situation blurs some logical lines (both consumers and developers still have choice: Android is larger than iOS!), but even putting that aside, Apple doesn’t qualify as a monopoly within this perspective because Apple doesn’t sell anything — it connects buyers and sellers as a marketplace operator. If anything, Apple in this case might be considered a monopsony, or a firm that enjoys exclusive buyer status: a monopsony is the only party to whom goods or services can be sold and can thus set prices in a way that maximizes its profit regardless of market forces.

But there’s no marginal cost of production for software, and given that Apple takes a percentage of in-app purchase revenues and not a fixed fee per purchase, both Apple and developers are incentivized to maximize revenue through appropriate pricing. This is the whole reason the freemium model rose to prominence on mobile in the first place: developers, not Apple, began reducing app prices until most settled at $0 simply because the competition for attention in the ever-crowding App Store was so ferocious. In fact, Apple seems to host a non-trivial amount of antipathy for the freemium model, as is evidenced with its Arcade product.

Coming back to Amazon: it is clear with this deal that turning a blind eye to the web payments workaround on iOS is ultimately leading to adoption of third-party payments. Far from being a monopoly, Apple is competing for users in a very crowded platforms marketplace: a tightly integrated system in which almost all participants not only operate platforms but also publish content on other companies’ platforms — a matrix of content stores and content.

The calculus that Apple is dealing with is: at what point does the total surface area of this matrix begin to influence the way Apple polices its own slice of the matrix? As consumers are presented with ever-increasing opportunities to consume their favorite content, when, for example, does the incremental value from offering frictionless access to Prime Video content on iOS outweigh the incremental revenue from 30% of a poorly-integrated Amazon Prime on iOS?

Obviously that decision isn’t restricted exclusively to Amazon Prime: Apple will have to begin to decide how this matrix, which represents consumer choice and optionality, will influence the freedom to which it allows developers to operate on iOS. But a decision like the one that Apple made with Amazon seems unlikely to not cascade out to other developers into a more comprehensive platform policy.

Photo by Arnel Hasanovic on Unsplash

Источник: https://mobiledevmemo.com/apples-iap-deal-with-amazon-and-the-beginning-of-a-new-era/

Apple Card stops working on Amazon for some, fix in the works [U]

A curious issue is affecting Apple Card users when it comes to using the credit card at Amazon. Some are reporting that not only is Apple Card not working at the retail giant, but it’s also disappearing from their saved payment options.


Update: An Amazon spokesperson shared the following statement with us: “We are aware of this technical issue and are actively working to resolve it as soon as possible.”

Meanwhile, another 9to5Mac reader reached out and shared a screenshot of a chat with Apple support that said they are also working with Amazon on a fix: “We are aware that Apple Card users are unable to make purchases at Amazon. This issue is specific to Amazon and we are working to resolve it.”


Brought up by reddit user Horse_Dad2, Amazon is having trouble with Apple Card as a payment method. They mention they’ve been using it successfully up until today but it was automatically removed from their Amazon payment options.

Horse_Dad2 also notes that Amazon kicks out an error message when trying to re-add the card. It’s hard to tell what’s really going on at this point, but an Amazon support rep said it had to do with Amazon interpreting Apple Card numbers as Apple Pay:

When I finally got someone from amazon on the phone, I was told that it was because their systems are starting to recognize the card number as Apple Pay, and amazon does not accept Apple Pay.

Others on reddit confirmed they’re seeing the same problem.

Just checked as well. My Apple Card has been removed from my Amazon Wallet. Tried to re-add it and getting this error
There was a problem. We’re sorry, we weren’t able to save your credit card information. Please enter it sbi card payment through hdfc netbanking or try using another form of payment.

Another added: “Same here- I used mine Wednesday and now it’s gone from my saved payments in Amazon.”

Here at 9to5Mac, we’re seeing the same problem, however, it may not be an issue across the board as one of us isn’t seeing the issue (at least for now).

Are you seeing the issue with Amazon? Let us know in the comments below!

FTC: We use income earning auto affiliate links.More.


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Источник: https://9to5mac.com/2020/10/23/apple-card-stops-working-on-amazon/

Enabling Amazon Pay

This page was printed on Nov 29, 2021. For the current version, visit https://help.shopify.com/en/manual/payments/accelerated-checkouts/amazon-pay.

Note

Amazon Pay is available to merchants located in specific countries and selling in USD, GBP, JPY, and EUR. For a list of supported countries, refer to Amazon Pay supported countries.

Amazon Pay is a fast, easy, and trusted way for your customers to make purchases on your online store by using payment and shipping information stored in their Amazon accounts. You keep full control of the customer relationship, and your product-level data is never captured or shared with Amazon. Learn more about secure checkouts from Amazon Pay.

Note

You're charged transaction fees each time a customer makes a purchase using this payment method, unless you also activate Shopify Payments.

Supported countries

To be eligible for Amazon Pay, your Shopify business must be based in one of the following countries:

  • United States
  • United Kingdom
  • Denmark
  • France
  • Germany
  • Hungary
  • Italy
  • Japan
  • Luxembourg
  • Netherlands
  • Portugal
  • Spain
  • Sweden

Note

Amazon Pay supports only USD, GBP, JPY, and EUR. Amazon Pay appears in the Payments section of your Shopify admin only if you are using a supported currency. Learn more about supported currencies for Amazon Pay from Amazon Pay Help.

Activate Amazon Pay

  1. From your Shopify admin, go to Settings > Payments.
  1. From the Shopify app, go to Store > Settings.
  2. Under Store settings, tap Payments.
  1. From the Shopify app, go to Store > Settings.
  2. Under Store settings, tap Payments.
  1. In the Amazon Pay section, click Activate Amazon Pay.

  2. Follow the instructions on the Amazon Pay website to create your account.

  3. If your Shopify store uses a custom primary domain, then add the homepage URL of your online store to your Amazon Pay Integration settings:

    1. In Amazon Seller Central, go to Integration > Integration Central.
    2. In the Manage client ID/store ID(s) section, click View client ID/store ID(s).
    3. From the App or store name drop-down menu, select your Shopify store, then click Edit.
    4. Add the complete homepage URL, such asto Allowed JavaScript origins.
    5. Click Save changes.

After you agree to provide your Shopify store with access to your Amazon Payments merchant account, then Amazon Pay appears as an active payment provider on the Payments page in your Shopify admin.

Note

If Amazon Pay is not displaying properly on your online store, it is likely because you have made HTML/CSS customizations to the checkout that are not supported by Amazon Pay. Contact Shopify support for more information.

Customer experience

After you activate Amazon Pay, eligible customers can select Amazon Pay during checkout. The payment process is embedded into the checkout page by default so that your customers can complete their orders without having to leave your online store.

Note

If your store's theme displays buttons for your active payment providers, then the Amazon Pay button appears on your amazon apple pay support cart page instead of its checkout page.

Customers who select Amazon Pay can access the shipping address and payment information stored in their Amazon account to complete their purchase with an accelerated checkout. Their billing address remains private, and is not shared with Shopify. Learn more about accelerated checkouts.

Источник: https://help.shopify.com/en/manual/payments/accelerated-checkouts/amazon-pay
amazon apple pay support

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