americas test kitchen sourdough

2 cups sourdough starter, room temperature* · 2 tablespoons granulated sugar · 1 egg** · 4 tablespoons olive oil · 1/2 teaspoon salt · 1 teaspoon baking soda · 1. America's Test Kitchen reports similar trends. Topping their recipe search list are banana bread, chocolate chip cookies, sloppy joes. as you probably know, is the magazine from America's Test Kitchen, He wanted the complexity of flavor that you get from a sourdough.

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How to Make Rustic French Fougasse Bread

Americas test kitchen sourdough -

No-Knead Sourdough Bread

I have been sharing quite a few sourdough recipes… and I have quite a few more. 😉 I made many of these baked goods while waiting for my sourdough starter to become fully active- which took a full month!

Now it’s (finally) time to share the most simple and delicious sourdough bread recipe I’ve made thus far. It is a sourdough version of the famous Dutch oven “no-knead” bread. Heavenly.

The recipe is from America’s Test Kitchen. I weighed the ingredients. I liked that the bread bakes on a piece of parchment paper inside the Dutch oven which is an improvement from the classic Sullivan Street No-Knead Bread. The preparation process begins the night before baking the loaf.

Yield: 1 large round loaf

Time: 1 1/4 hours, plus 14 hours resting

  • 18.3 oz (3 2/3 cups) all-purpose flour (preferably King Arthur or substitute any brand bread flour)
  • 1 3/4 tsp fine sea salt or coarse salt
  • 12.6 oz (1 1/2 cups plus 4 tsp) water, room temperature
  • 3 oz (1/3 cup) mature sourdough starter
  1. Ideally, feed your starter the morning you are planning to make the dough. Leave it at room temperature for up to 12 hours. (I weighed and fed 3oz of starter with equal parts water and flour and left it loosely covered at room temperature for 10 -12 hours.)
  2. Whisk flour and salt together in medium bowl. (I try to start the process at 7pm)
  3. Whisk room-temperature water and starter in large bowl until smooth.
  4. Add flour mixture to water mixture and stir using wooden spoon, scraping up dry flour from bottom of bowl until dough comes together, then knead by hand in bowl until shaggy ball forms and no dry flour remains.
  5. Cover bowl with plastic wrap and let sit at room temperature for at least 12 hours or up to 18 hours.
  6. Lay 12 by 12-inch sheet of parchment paper on counter and spray generously with vegetable oil spray.
  7. Transfer dough to lightly floured counter and knead 10 to 15 times. (I lightly flour my hands as well.)
  8. Shape dough into ball by pulling edges into middle. (For the best rise, you want to create a smooth, round, somewhat taut top.)
  9. Transfer dough, seam side down, to center of parchment.
  10. Pick up dough by lifting parchment edges and lower into heavy-bottomed Dutch oven. Cover with plastic wrap.
  11. Adjust oven rack to middle position and place a metal loaf or cake pan in bottom of oven.
  12. Place pot on middle rack and pour 3 cups of boiling water into pan below.
  13. Close oven door and let dough rise until doubled in size and does not readily spring back when poked with your floured finger, 2 to 3 hours.
  14. Remove pot and water pan from oven; discard plastic from pot.
  15. Lightly flour top of dough (I use a small sieve) and, using razor blade, kitchen shears, or sharp knife, make one 7-inch-long, 1/2-inch-deep slit along top of dough. (Using kitchen shears, I made a large # on the top of the dough instead.)
  16. Cover pot and place on middle rack in oven.
  17. Heat oven to 425 degrees. Bake bread for 30 minutes (start timing as soon as you turn on the oven).
  18. Remove lid and continue to bake until loaf is deep brown and registers 210 degrees, 20 to 30 minutes longer. (I baked mine for an additional 22 minutes.)
  19. Carefully remove bread from pot; transfer to wire rack and let cool completely before serving.

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About [email protected]

I live in Stony Brook, New York on Long Island. I love garlic and baking. My hobby (and love) is to try new recipes. My favorite recipe resources include The New York Times, Food and Wine, Bon Appetit, and Martha Stewart Living. Enjoy!

View all posts by [email protected]

Источник: https://thebrookcook.wordpress.com/2020/05/27/no-knead-sourdough-bread/

No Fail, Sour Cream Pie Crust

This recipe makes enough dough for a top and bottom crust for a 9-inch pie.

The dough ratio is 1 cup flour: 1 stick butter: 1/4 cup sour cream: 1/2 teaspoon salt: 1 teaspoon sugar. These are the amounts for a single-crust 9-inch pie.

If you are making a 10-inch pie, use 2 1/2 cups flour, 2 1/2 sticks (10 ounces, 1  1/4 cup) butter, 1/2 cup plus 2 Tbsp sour cream for a double crust, or 1 1/4 cups flour, 1 1/4 sticks (5 ounces) butter, 1/4 cup plus 1 Tbsp sour cream for a single crust.

  • 2 cups (280g) all purpose flour

  • 1teaspoonsalt (skip if using salted butter)

  • 2teaspoonssugar (for sweet recipes, otherwise skip)

  • 2 sticks unsalted butter (1 cup, 8 ounces, 225g) cubed

  • 1/2cup (115ml) sour cream (full fat, NOT light sour cream)

  1. Cut butter into cubes and let sit for a couple minutes:

    Cut the butter into cubes and let it sit on the counter to take the chill off (don't soften the butter, just let it sit out for couple minutes when you take it out of the fridge).

  2. Whisk together flour, salt, sugar:

    In a large bowl, vigorously whisk together the flour, salt (omit if using salted butter), and sugar (if using).

  3. Work the butter into the flour with your hands:

    Sprinkled the cubes of butter over the flour. Use your clean hands to squish the flour and butter together with your thumbs, fingers, and knuckles. Work the butter into the dough until you have what resembles a coarse meal with some flattened chunks of butter.

  4. Add sour cream:

    Add the sour cream to the flour butter mixture. Use a fork to incorporate into the mixture.

  5. Form dough into disks, refrigerate:

    Use your hands to gather the pastry dough together into a large ball. Use a knife to cut the ball in half. Form into two disks. As you work the dough into disks, it should end up smooth, having the consistency of Play-Doh. Don't worry about over-working this dough. Form the disks so that there are no cracks.

    Sprinkle all over with a little flour. Wrap tightly with plastic wrap. Once you wrap the dough disk in plastic wrap, you can massage the dough and the edges with your warm hands to close any cracks. Chill in the refrigerator for an hour or up to a day ahead.

    If you want to freeze for future use, wrap again, this time with aluminum foil and freeze (leave in refrigerator overnight to thaw before using).

  6. Remove dough from fridge, let sit for a few minutes, then roll out:

    After the dough has been sitting in the fridge for an hour, remove it and let it sit for 5-10 minutes at room temperature to become more malleable before rolling out.

    If it still feels too stiff to roll out, hold your hands around the edges to soften.

    To roll out, sprinkle a clean, flat surface with flour. As you roll the dough, check to make sure the bottom is not sticking. If it is, lift it up and sprinkle a little flour underneath.

    Roll out to 12 to 14 inches wide, to an even thickness.

    You can use this pastry dough for unstructured rustic pies or galettes, or single or double crusted traditional pies. It can also be used for a savory pot pie.

    Whether you use the dough for a galette or a double crust pie, it will be prettier with a light egg wash. Just whisk one egg in a small bowl, add a teaspoon of water, and brush lightly over the exposed crust with a pastry brush, right before baking.

Blind-baking this pie crust

This pie crust recipe is difficult to pre-bake. There is more fat in it than a regular crust, which can cause the sides to slump if you bake it without a filling. That said, I have successfully pre-baked this crust by fluting the edges of the dough extra high above the edges of the pie pan, freezing the crust for at least 30 minutes first, lining it with heavy foil, filling it all of the way with white granulated sugar, then baking it at 350°F for 50 minutes. (See our instructions for blind baking a pie crust.)

Nutrition Facts
2893Calories
207g Fat
227g Carbs
34g Protein
Show Full Nutrition LabelHide Full Nutrition Label
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Nutrition Facts
Servings: 1
Amount per serving
Calories2893
% Daily Value*
207g266%
Saturated Fat 126g628%
552mg184%
2392mg104%
227g83%
Dietary Fiber 8g27%
Total Sugars 13g
34g

Nutrition information is calculated using an ingredient database and should be considered an estimate. In cases where multiple ingredient alternatives are given, the first listed is calculated for nutrition. Garnishes and optional ingredients are not included.

Источник: https://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/sour_cream_pie_crust/

America's Test Kitchen's Rosemary Focaccia Bread

do have to plan ahead since you have to make the biga (aka preferment, starter, poolish) 8-24 hours before the rest of the dough and there’s a lot of waiting time in between each of the steps. The time used to all the bread to rest and rise basically replaces you having to knead the dough. Gluten will naturally form in time and through a little bit of folding. This becomes in a way a no knead bread. Rest assured that the bread will continue to rise in the oven in a process called the oven spring. The oven spring is the bread's last hurrah where it rises once last time before the yeast dies in the heat of the oven.
Putting together the Focaccia Biga
Putting together the Focaccia Biga

After making several breads, there’s a point once a bread is done and you let it cool that you cut into it. I call this the Moment of Truth because it’s hard to gauge how the bread will turn out. Yes, you do have a thermometer to make sure that the center of the bread hits 200-210 degrees Fahrenheit, but there’s always going to be that sense of suspense and uncertainty right before you cut into it when you see whether Santa left you a nice little present or a lump of coal. The instant read thermometer did register the magic number of 210 degrees exactly when I took it out of the oven and the crust was crisp and wasn’t hard. Allow me to say that it came out perfectly: the center was cooked all the way through and the crumb structure was just immaculate. I find that focaccia bread gives you a nice looking crumb with plenty of air bubbles, a common characteristic of artisan breads. Not only that but when I took my first bite, I just felt like I was in heaven - yes it was THAT good. I actually made this focaccia bread to complement the eggplant parmesan I made as well for a nice Sunday Italian dinner, but in actuality this focaccia would go well with any Italian dish: fettuccine alfredo, spaghetti with meatballs, tortellini, cheese ravioli, lasagna, etc.

Yeast eating sugars and releasing air bubbles
Focaccia Biga the morning after being made: the holes indicate the yeast is working by eating the sugars and releasing air bubbles for flavor.

The difference between this focaccia bread and other focaccia breads is that the crust is crisp and gives a good crunch. Other focaccia breads have a soft crust with almost a fluffy, sponge-like texture. I have nothing against that type of focaccia bread which is the type that I would most likely encounter. I personally don't know why some focaccias come out that way and why others come out crunchy, but I do like both kinds. My theory is the high hydration level of the dough.

Italian Focaccia Bread sprinkled with coarse sea salt and garlic
Italian Focaccia Bread sprinkled with coarse sea salt and garlic

I wouldn't change much in this recipe. The bread came out how I expected with good flavor and texture. I just added some coarse sea salt and some garlic as a topping [Update 9-6-13: I put 2 heaping teaspoons of fresh, minced garlic in the dough because the garlic tended to burn when sprinkled on top. What also works is to heat the olive oil with a few cloves of garlic in a sauce pan giving you garlic infused olive oil and then mincing the garlic and incorporating it into the dough]. Rosemary has that distinct piney and earthy flavor, and I would lessen the amount of rosemary because I didn't want the rosemary flavor to be too overwhelming.

Crumb structure of the Focaccia
The Crumb Structure of my Focaccia Bread

In terms of the process of making the focaccia bread, instead of going through the trouble of putting the dough on a floured surface, having to handle such a wet and sticky dough, and splitting the dough into 2 round pans, I would actually just use 1 pan for the entire dough. The reason for this is because it could be very difficult when doing step 4 of the recipe below. When you watch the accompanying video, your dough will NOT turn out the way that America's Test Kitchen chef Becky Hays. Your dough will have the consistency like that of pancake batter.

ATK Focaccia dough in one pan
Focaccia Dough if you were to use one rimmed baking sheet instead of 2 round pans.

Instead what you should do is just oil up a rectangular rimmed baking sheet and just pour out the batter straight from the mixing bowl using an oiled spatula. Because I found it difficult handling the wet dough (putting it onto a floured surface, halving it, and putting each half into a separate pan), this allows you to bypass that altogether. The only time you would have to handle the dough is when the dough is already on your baking sheet and once the top of the dough is well oiled (and your fingers are oiled too), it'll be easy to spread the dough out to fill out more of your rectangular baking sheet. Most focaccia breads I've seen are cooked on rectangular baking sheets.

Making 1 large focaccia instead of 2 small ones
Common in Italy to make 1 large Focaccia instead of 2 smaller ones

FlavorFool's Notes

  • The dough for focaccia bread is extremely wet. It is so wet that this dough is virtually impossible to knead. Because of the high hydration of this dough, you have to be very delicate and gentle when handling it. No one told me that making focaccia was like trying to diffuse a plutonium bomb...no sudden movements, only precise and surgical motions in the presence of daunting circumstances. The recipe says to use a liberal amount of flour to dust your work surface and your hands. Do dust your work surface with flour, but I recommend that you coat your hands with olive oil instead of flour. The dough has a lesser chance of sticking to your hands when handling it and putting it into the pans.
  • My biga looked more wet than in the video, but I was still able to make it work.
  • I know that every oven is different, but this recipe becomes fully baked after 28-30 minutes. However, at this time, the outer crust of the bread becomes too crisp and the inside crumb is no longer soft and chewy. I suggest cutting the time by 5 minutes or so.
  • Because this recipe lacks fat (other than the olive oil used to brush the surface), it’ll go stale quickly. Fat in the form of butter, oil, milk, etc. makes a bread last longer. After a few hours, you can already taste the staleness setting in, so be sure to eat right away or freeze. You can always warm it up in the oven.
  • The recipe calls for 2 tbsp of olive oil in the pan that you would use to coat both sides of the dough (see accompanying video). Because of the delicate nature of the dough, I only put 1 tbsp of olive oil in the pan and brushed the 2nd tbsp of olive oil over the top. I wanted to avoid over handling the dough.
  • I added fresh minced garlic that I used as a topping in addition to the fresh rosemary that was used. Instead of adding salt to the bottom of the pan, I ended up sprinkling a pinch of coarse sea salt on top similar to what you would see on a traditional Bavarian Pretzel. When it comes to focaccia bread, I like it plenty salty and garlicky. I found if you used the amount of fresh rosemary as the recipe indicates, the rosemary overpowers everything else, so go easy on the rosemary. Other common toppings for a focaccia bread include sun dried tomatoes, parmesan cheese, shallots, salami, caramelized onions, kalamata olives, gorgonzola cheese (the Italian version of blue cheese), grapes, raisins, etc.
  • I find that when making bread, portioning out the flour can get messy with flour spilling onto the counters as you're scooping it out since my flour jar opening is quite small when putting in a measuring cup or it's filled to the brim. In either case, flour always finds a way to get spilled when scooping. In this recipe, you have to do it twice - once for the biga (1/2 cup flour) and then another time for the rest of the bread (flour). To minimize the amount of scooping and spilling of flour, I just portion out the entire amount of flour used in the recipe (3 cups) and put it in a bowl that is big enough and then set it aside. Then from those 3 cups, I portion out 1/2 cup flour for the biga and put it in a bowl of equal size. I then add the water and yeast to the smaller porton to make my biga. When the next day comes and it's time to prepare the rest of the bread, I'll already have the remaining 2.5 cups of flour measured out and all I'll need to do is add that to my biga. I no longer have to go through the trouble of portioning out another 2.5 cups of flour from the flour jar and cleaning up the spilled flour on the counter since it's already done.
  • I find it easier to pour out the dough onto 1 larger rectangular rimmed baking sheet instead of having to handle the dough to halve it and putting it into 2 smaller round pans. This saves you from having to handle the gentle and wet dough too much. Handling extremely wet dough to me is such a pain.
  • Rosemary Focaccia Recipe

    America's Test Kitchen - season 11 episode 22, Simply Italian
    Makes two 9-inch round loaves

    Ingredients

    If you don’t have a baking stone, bake the bread on an overturned, preheated rimmed baking sheet set on the upper-middle oven rack. The bread can be kept for up to 2 days well wrapped at room temperature or frozen for 2 months wrapped in foil and placed in a zipper-lock bag.

    Ingredients
    Biga
    1/2 cup (2 1/2 oz) unbleached all-purpose flour
    1/4 tsp instant or rapid-rise yeast
    1/3 cup (2 2/3 oz) warm water (100-110 degrees F)

    Dough
    1 1/4 cups (10 oz) warm water (100-110 degrees F)
    2 1/2 cups (12 1/2 oz) unbleached all-purpose flour, plus extra for shaping
    2 tsp Kosher salt
    1 tsp instant or rapid-rise yeast
    4 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
    2 tbsp chopped fresh rosemary [this is way too much so I used about 1 tsp for both loaves]

    Instructions

    1. FOR THE BIGA: Combine flour, water, and yeast in large bowl and stir with wooden spoon until uniform mass forms and no dry flour remains, about 1 minute. Cover bowl tightly with plastic wrap and let stand at room temperature (about 70 degrees) overnight (at least 8 hours and up to 24 hours.) Use immediately or store in refrigerator for up to 3 days (allow to stand at room temperature 30 minutes before proceeding with recipe.)

    2. FOR THE DOUGH: Stir flour, water, and yeast into biga with wooden spoon until uniform mass forms and no dry flour remains, about 1 minute. Cover with plastic wrap and let rise at room temperature for 15 minutes.

    3. Sprinkle 2 teaspoons salt over dough; stir into dough until thoroughly incorporated, about 1 minute. Cover with plastic wrap and let rise at room temperature 30 minutes. Spray rubber spatula or bowl scraper with nonstick cooking spray; fold partially risen dough over itself by gently lifting and folding edge of dough toward middle. Turn bowl 90 degrees; fold again. Turn bowl and fold dough 6 more times (total of 8 turns). Cover with plastic wrap and let rise for 30 minutes. Repeat folding, turning, and rising 2 more times, for total of three 30-minute rises. Meanwhile, adjust oven rack to upper-middle position, place baking stone on rack, and heat oven to 500 degrees at least 30 minutes before baking.

    4. Gently transfer dough to lightly floured counter. Lightly dust top of dough with flour and divide in half. Shape each piece of dough into 5-inch round by gently tucking under edges. Coat two 9-inch round cake pans with 2 tablespoons [I used 1 tbsp to coat the pan and I brushed the other tbsp on top] olive oil each. Sprinkle each pan with ½ teaspoon kosher salt [I didn't do this but instead sprinkled a pinch of coarse sea salt on top]. Place round of dough in pan, top side down; slide dough around pan to coat bottom and sides, then flip over. Repeat with second piece of dough. Cover pans with plastic wrap and let rest for 5 minutes.

    5. Using fingertips, press dough out toward edges of pan. (If dough resists stretching, let it relax for 5 to 10 minutes before trying again.) Using dinner fork, poke surface of dough 25 to 30 times, popping any large bubbles. Sprinkle rosemary evenly over top of dough. Let dough rest until slightly bubbly, 5 to 10 minutes.

    6. Place pans on baking stone and reduce oven temperature to 450 degrees. Bake until tops are golden brown, 25 to 28 minutes, switching placement of pans halfway through baking. Transfer pans to wire rack and let cool 5 minutes. Remove loaves from pan and return to wire rack. Brush tops with any oil remaining in pan. Let cool 30 minutes before serving.


    Video: Chef Becky Hays Making Rosemary Focaccia Bread on America's Test Kitchen

    Источник: http://www.madeinmykitchen.com/2012/09/americas-test-kitchens-rosemary.html

    Top Chef Family Style

    Names[4]Ages Relationship[4]Hometown[4]Kiran Alwy & Moid Alwy 14, 42 Daughter & Father St. Louis Park, MinnesotaMilan Bhayana & Chandrani Ghosh 15, 50 Son & Mother Chevy Chase, MarylandKhalil Blue & Willie Blue 13, 41 Son & Father Houston, TexasAinsley Crouse & Hayley Crouse 11, 40 Daughter & Mother Douglassville, PennsylvaniaJack Cruickshank & Bobbie Lopez 12, 51 Son & Mother Phoenix, ArizonaTaylor Ellison & Elizabeth Frame Ellison 9, 38 Son & Mother San Francisco, CaliforniaDelilah Flores & Daniel "Danny" Flores 13, 24 Niece & Uncle Ontario, CaliforniaKaj Friis-Hecht & Liz Thorpe 14, 42 Nephew & Aunt New Orleans, LouisianaOcean Kanekoa & Jaydene Kanekoa 15, 34 Brother & Sister Kamuela, HawaiiEva Kopelman & Jenn Kopelman 14, 55 Daughter & Mother Long Island, New YorkAnika Kumar & Anupama "Anu" Kumar 12, 46 Daughter & Mother Palo Alto, CaliforniaBrooke Nathanson & Carol Weiss 12, 75 Granddaughter & Grandmother Ashland, MassachusettsKennedy Torres & Rosie Torres 15, 41 Daughter & Mother Palmer, Alaska
    Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Top_Chef_Family_Style

    Sticky Buns (America’s Test Kitchen)

     
    It’s finally time for me to learn to make Sticky Buns and there’s no better source to get the recipe from than America’s Test Kitchen‘s top 20 recipes all of time. 

    Sticky Buns

    This is from Season 17 and is rated 5th overall.  Bret bought a 6-quart KitchenAid mixer for me and these buns are the perfect thing to make on its maiden voyage. (And I do mean voyage – this new mixer is as big as a boat.)

    The ingredient list and the instructions look long and involved, but it’s really rather straight forward to create these tasty little buns.

    It starts with a sticky dough that becomes a beautiful, silky risen dough that’s great to work with. The stand mixer does all the kneading work, so you can just sit back and take a little nap during the mixing.

    Sticky Buns

    The buns bake up soft, fluffy, and perfect. America’s Test Kitchen does a great job on the instructions, detailing every step so that even a novice will succeed.

    These Sticky Buns aren’t actually dripping with gooey topping. They have just enough to make a perfect, thick layer of caramely and sticky goodness. If you want the buns stickier and gooey-er you can make more topping, although I do think you’ll find this recipe gets it just right.

    It’s gonna be hard, but have patience – you need to wait till these buns are completely cooled to eat them. When they’re ready, the ratio of soft, fluffy bun to the layer of gooey caramel goodness is spot-on delicious.

    An observation, though, is that they’re best the first day after being completely cooled. If you can’t eat all of them the first day, microwave for 10-15 seconds for the best taste and texture. ATK gets my vote for best sticky buns!

    Sticky Buns

    This recipe is an investment in time, mainly because of the two rising hours. I enjoyed making these buns, though, and we’re enjoying eating them even more.

    Sticky Buns (America's Test Kitchen)

    Sticky Buns (America's Test Kitchen)

    Total Time: 3 hours30 minutes

    An outstanding version of the standard sticky bun. Soft and tender with a chewy, gooey caramely topping.

    Ingredients

    • Flour Paste:
    • 2/3 C water
    • 1/4 C (1 1/3 oz) bread flour
    • Dough:
    • 2/3 C milk
    • 1 large egg plus 1 egg yolk
    • 2 3/4 C (15 1/8 oz) bread flour
    • 2 tsp (1 packet) instant or rapid-rise yeast
    • 3 tbsp granulated sugar
    • 1 1/2 tsp salt
    • 6 tbsp butter, softened (ATK recommends unsalted)
    • Topping:
    • 6 tbsp butter, melted (ATK recommends unsalted)
    • 1/2 C (3 1/2 oz) dark brown sugar
    • 1/4 C (1 3/4 oz) granulated sugar
    • 1/4 C dark corn syrup
    • 1/4 tsp salt
    • 2 tbsp water
    • 1 C pecans, toasted and chopped (optional)
    • Filling
    • 3/4 C packed (5 1/4 oz) dark brown sugar
    • 1 tsp ground cinnamon

    Instructions

    1. For the flour paste: In a small bowl, whisk the water and flour together until smooth. Microwave in 25 second increments, whisking after each 25 seconds, until stiff, smooth, pudding-like consistency with a total of 50 to 75 seconds.
    2. For the dough: In bowl of stand mixer with the whisk attachment, whisk flour paste and milk together until smooth. Add egg and yolk and whisk to combine. Fit stand mixer with dough hook , then add the flour and yeast. Mix on low speed until all of the flour is moistened, 1 to 2 minutes. Let stand for 15 minutes. Add sugar and salt and mix on medium-low speed for 5 minutes. Stop mixer and add butter. Continue to mix on medium-low for 5 minutes longer, scraping down the dough hook and sides of bowl when needed. Dough will be very sticky.
    3. Lightly flour your counter or marble and scoop the dough on the surface. Knead briefly to form a ball and transfer, seam side down, to a lightly greased large bowl. Spray dough ball lightly with cooking spray and cover the bowl with plastic wrap. Let dough rise until just doubled in volume - 45 minutes to 1 hour.
    4. For the topping: While the dough rises, grease 13x9" metal baking pan. Whisk the melted butter, brown sugar, granulated sugar, corn syrup, and salt together in medium bowl until smooth. Add the water and whisk carefully until smooth. Pour the mixture into the prepared pan and tilt the pan to cover it evenly. (Sprinkle with pecans, if using).
    5. For the Filling: Combine sugar and cinnamon in small bowl and mix until thoroughly combined; set aside.
    6. Turn out the risen dough onto a lightly floured surface. Press dough gently, but firmly to expel the air. Working from the center toward the edge, pat and stretch dough to form 18x15" rectangle, with the long end facing you. Sprinkle the sugar/cinnamon mixture evenly over the dough, leaving a 1" border along the top edge. Smooth the filling into an even layer with your hand, then gently press the filling into the dough to adhere.
    7. Begin with the long edge near you and gently roll the dough into a loose cylinder, taking care not to roll too tightly (if too tightly rolled, the rolls with rise upward). Pinch the seam together to seal and roll the seam to the bottom.
    8. Mark the cylinder into 12 equal portions (there should be twelve, 1 1/2" portions). To slice, get a 10 to 12 inch strand of unflavored dental floss, hold it taut, and slip it under the roll to the first mark. Cross the ends of floss over each other and pull, cutting the slice. Repeat with all slices.
    9. Transfer the slices, cut sides down, into the prepared pan with the topping, spaced evenly. Cover the pan tightly with plastic wrap and let rise in a draft-free warm place until the buns are puffy and touching one another, 45 minutes to 1 hour.
    10. While buns are rising, adjust the oven racks to lowest and lower-middle positions. Place a rimmed baking sheet on the lower rack to catch any drips. Preheat the oven to 375°.
    11. Bake buns on upper rack until lightly golden brown, about 20 minutes. Carefully tent the pan with aluminum foil to avoid further browning and bake until center of dough registers at least 200°, 12-15 minutes longer. Remove from the oven, remove the foil and let buns cool in the pan on wire rack for 5 minutes. Lightly run a butter knife around the edges of the pan, then place a rimmed baking sheet over buns and carefully invert onto the sheet. Scoop up any glaze left in the baking pan onto buns. Let cool for at least 10 minutes longer before serving (best after completely cooled, though).

    Notes

    Tips and Stuff:

    You'll notice the weights of the ingredients in the instructions.  I do weigh them to get the best results and highly recommend investing in an inexpensive kitchen scale.

    You can refrigerate the slices in the pan (before the 2nd rising) overnight, for up to 14 hours, then bake them.  To bake, remove the pan from the refrigerator and let sit until buns are puffy and touching one another, 1 to 1 1/2 hours.  Then bake as usual.

    Both of the rising times took the entire hour for me.  

    ATK recommends unsalted butter, but I use salted.  It worked fine.

    I didn't use pecans, but if you do be sure and toast them first (spread on a baking sheet, 350° for 5 or so minutes until you just smell the nuttiness).  It really makes a difference in the taste.

    Nutrition Information:
    Yield: 12Serving Size: 1 roll
    Amount Per Serving:Calories: 407Total Fat: 19gSaturated Fat: 8gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 10gCholesterol: 63mgSodium: 459mgCarbohydrates: 53gFiber: 2gSugar: 20gProtein: 7g

    Nutrition Values are Approximate

    Filed Under: All Recipes, Breads/Muffins, BreakfastTagged With: America's Test Kitchen, breakfast, caramel buns, cinnamon buns, desserts, sticky buns, sticky buns from America's Test Kitchen, sweet buns, yeast buns

    Источник: https://myrecipereviews.com/2020/03/06/sticky-buns-americas-test-kitchen/

    : Americas test kitchen sourdough

    Americas test kitchen sourdough
    WHAT IS AN ONLINE ID BANK OF AMERICA
    Americas test kitchen sourdough
    americas test kitchen sourdough

    Americas test kitchen sourdough -

    BUY THE BOOK:

    Our aim was to come up with an ideal selection of breads and the most foolproof process for making each of them. And for added confidence, each of the more than 100 recipes is accompanied by step-by-step photo tutorials.

    We’ve organized Bread Illustrated into chapters that build in complexity as they progress, so your confidence grows as you bake your way through the book.

    Chapters

    Welcome to America’s Test Kitchen
    Introduction
    Understanding Bread
    Starting From Scratch
    Sandwich Breads
    Mastering Size and Shape
    The Perfect Crust
    The Sweeter Side
    Upping Your Game with Sponges
    Raising the Bar
    Conversions and Equivalents
    Index

    Full Recipe List

    STARTING FROM SCRATCH: 12 FOOLPROOF BREADS THAT TEACH THE BASICS
    Quick Cheese Bread
    Quick Cheese Bread with Bacon and Onion
    Southern-Style Skillet Cornbread
    Spicy Southern-Style Skillet Cornbread
    Brown Soda Bread
    Brown Soda Bread with Currants and Caraway
    Almost No-Knead Bread
    Classic Italian Bread
    Easy Sandwich Bread
    Fluffy Dinner Rolls
    Butter Fan Rolls
    Flour Tortillas
    Pan-Grilled Flatbread
    Skillet Pizza
    Monkey Bread (preview recipe online)

    SANDWICH BREADS: EVERYDAY LOAVES, MODERN AND CLASSIC 
    American Sandwich Bread
    Whole-Wheat American Sandwich Bread
    Pain de Mie
    Japanese Milk Bread (preview recipe online)
    No-Knead Brioche
    Potato-Dill Sandwich Bread
    Anadama Bread
    Whole-Wheat Quinoa Bread
    Deli Rye Bread
    Cranberry-Walnut Loaf
    Spicy Olive Bread

    MASTERING SIZE AND SHAPE: DINNER ROLLS AND MORE
    Rustic Dinner Rolls
    Honey-Wheat Dinner Rolls
    Potato Dinner Rolls with Cheddar and Mustard
    Potato Burger Buns
    Parker House Rolls
    Crescent Rolls
    Popovers
    Kaiser Rolls (preview recipe online)
    Hoagie Rolls
    English Muffins
    Classic Bialys
    Garlic Knots
    Parmesan Breadsticks
    Asiago and Black Pepper Breadsticks
    Pecorino and Mixed Herb Breadsticks
    Ballpark Pretzels

    THE PERFECT CRUST: PIZZAS AND FLATBREADS FROM AROUND THE WORLD
    Thin-Crust Pizza
    Thin-Crust Whole-Wheat Pizza
    Thin-Crust Whole-Wheat Pizza with Wine-Braised Onions and Blue Cheese
    Deep-Dish Pizza
    Deep-Dish Pizza with Sausage
    Sicilian-Style Thick-Crust Pizza
    Spinach-Ricotta Calzones (preview recipe online)
    Three-Meat Calzones
    Middle Eastern Za’atar Bread
    Pissaladière
    Red Pepper Coques
    Lahmacun
    Pitas
    Whole-Wheat Pitas

    THE SWEETER SIDE: ENRICHED BREADS AND OTHER TREATS
    Ultimate Cinnamon Buns
    Morning Buns
    Mallorcas (preview recipe online)
    St. Lucia Buns
    Kolaches
    Fruit-filled Kolaches
    Oatmeal Raisin Bread
    Challah
    Cinnamon Swirl Bread
    Chocolate Babka
    Portuguese Sweet Bread
    Kugelhopf
    Panettone
    Stollen
    Almond Ring Coffee Cake
    Apricot-Orange Ring Coffee Cake
    Yeasted Doughnuts
    Yeasted Cinnamon-Sugar Doughnuts
    Yeasted Vanilla-Glazed Doughnuts

    UPPING YOUR GAME WITH SPONGES: BAKERY-STYLE ARTISAN LOAVES
    Pane Francese
    Whole-Wheat Sandwich Bread
    Scali Bread
    Pumpernickel
    Pain de Campagne
    Rustic Wheat Berry Bread (preview recipe online)
    Cheddar and Black Pepper Bread (preview recipe online)
    Caramelized Onion Bread
    Fig and Fennel Bread
    Sage-Polenta Bread
    Honey-Spelt Bread
    Ciabatta
    Durum Bread
    Rosemary Focaccia
    Focaccia with Caramelized Red Onion, Pancetta, and Oregano

    RAISING THE BAR: PROJECT RECIPES WORTH THE TIME
    Sourdough Bread
    Sourdough Culture
    Auvergne Crown
    Bakery-Style French Baguettes
    Pain d’Epi
    Seeded Ficelle
    Fougasse
    Fougasse with Asiago and Black Pepper
    Fougasse with Bacon and Gruyère
    Olive Fougasse
    Sprouted Grain Bread
    New York-Style Bagels
    Topped Bagels
    Everything Bagels
    Cinnamon-Raisin Bagels
    Croissants
    Kouign-Amann

     

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    Источник: https://breadillustrated.wordpress.com/full-recipe-list/

    Sticky Buns (America’s Test Kitchen)

     
    It’s finally time for me to learn to make Sticky Buns and there’s no better source to get the recipe from than America’s Test Kitchen‘s top 20 recipes all of time. 

    Sticky Buns

    This is from Season 17 and is rated 5th overall.  Bret bought a 6-quart KitchenAid mixer for me and these buns are the perfect thing to make on its maiden voyage. (And I do mean voyage – this new mixer is as big as a boat.)

    The ingredient list and the instructions look long and involved, but it’s really rather straight forward to create these tasty little buns.

    It starts with a sticky dough that becomes a beautiful, silky risen dough that’s great to work with. The stand mixer does all the kneading work, so you can just sit back and take a little nap during the mixing.

    Sticky Buns

    The buns bake up soft, fluffy, and perfect. America’s Test Kitchen does a great job on the instructions, detailing every step so that even a novice will succeed.

    These Sticky Buns aren’t actually dripping with gooey topping. They have just enough to make a perfect, thick layer of caramely and sticky goodness. If you want the buns stickier and gooey-er you can make more topping, although I do think you’ll find this recipe gets it just right.

    It’s gonna be hard, but have patience – you need to wait till these buns are completely cooled to eat them. When they’re ready, the ratio of soft, fluffy bun to the layer of gooey caramel goodness is spot-on delicious.

    An observation, though, is that they’re best the first day after being completely cooled. If you can’t eat all of them the first day, microwave for 10-15 seconds for the best taste and texture. ATK gets my vote for best sticky buns!

    Sticky Buns

    This recipe is an investment in time, mainly because of the two rising hours. I enjoyed making these buns, though, and we’re enjoying eating them even more.

    Sticky Buns (America's Test Kitchen)

    Sticky Buns (America's Test Kitchen)

    Total Time: 3 hours30 minutes

    An outstanding version of the standard sticky bun. Soft and tender with a chewy, gooey caramely topping.

    Ingredients

    • Flour Paste:
    • 2/3 C water
    • 1/4 C (1 1/3 oz) bread flour
    • Dough:
    • 2/3 C milk
    • 1 large egg plus 1 egg yolk
    • 2 3/4 C (15 1/8 oz) bread flour
    • 2 tsp (1 packet) instant or rapid-rise yeast
    • 3 tbsp granulated sugar
    • 1 1/2 tsp salt
    • 6 tbsp butter, softened (ATK recommends unsalted)
    • Topping:
    • 6 tbsp butter, melted (ATK recommends unsalted)
    • 1/2 C (3 1/2 oz) dark brown sugar
    • 1/4 C (1 3/4 oz) granulated sugar
    • 1/4 C dark corn syrup
    • 1/4 tsp salt
    • 2 tbsp water
    • 1 C pecans, toasted and chopped (optional)
    • Filling
    • 3/4 C packed (5 1/4 oz) dark brown sugar
    • 1 tsp ground cinnamon

    Instructions

    1. For the flour paste: In a small bowl, whisk the water and flour together until smooth. Microwave in 25 second increments, whisking after each 25 seconds, until stiff, smooth, pudding-like consistency with a total of 50 to 75 seconds.
    2. For the dough: In bowl of stand mixer with the whisk attachment, whisk flour paste and milk together until smooth. Add egg and yolk and whisk to combine. Fit stand mixer with dough hook , then add the flour and yeast. Mix on low speed until all of the flour is moistened, 1 to 2 minutes. Let stand for 15 minutes. Add sugar and salt and mix on medium-low speed for 5 minutes. Stop mixer and add butter. Continue to mix on medium-low for 5 minutes longer, scraping down the dough hook and sides of bowl when needed. Dough will be very sticky.
    3. Lightly flour your counter or marble and scoop the dough on the surface. Knead briefly to form a ball and transfer, seam side down, to a lightly greased large bowl. Spray dough ball lightly with cooking spray and cover the bowl with plastic wrap. Let dough rise until just doubled in volume - 45 minutes to 1 hour.
    4. For the topping: While the dough rises, grease 13x9" metal baking pan. Whisk the melted butter, brown sugar, granulated sugar, corn syrup, and salt together in medium bowl until smooth. Add the water and whisk carefully until smooth. Pour the mixture into the prepared pan and tilt the pan to cover it evenly. (Sprinkle with pecans, if using).
    5. For the Filling: Combine sugar and cinnamon in small bowl and mix until thoroughly combined; set aside.
    6. Turn out the risen dough onto a lightly floured surface. Press dough gently, but firmly to expel the air. Working from the center toward the edge, pat and stretch dough to form 18x15" rectangle, with the long end facing you. Sprinkle the sugar/cinnamon mixture evenly over the dough, leaving a 1" border along the top edge. Smooth the filling into an even layer with your hand, then gently press the filling into the dough to adhere.
    7. Begin with the long edge near you and gently roll the dough into a loose cylinder, taking care not to roll too tightly (if too tightly rolled, the rolls with rise upward). Pinch the seam together to seal and roll the seam to the bottom.
    8. Mark the cylinder into 12 equal portions (there should be twelve, 1 1/2" portions). To slice, get a 10 to 12 inch strand of unflavored dental floss, hold it taut, and slip it under the roll to the first mark. Cross the ends of floss over each other and pull, cutting the slice. Repeat with all slices.
    9. Transfer the slices, cut sides down, into the prepared pan with the topping, spaced evenly. Cover the pan tightly with plastic wrap and let rise in a draft-free warm place until the buns are puffy and touching one another, 45 minutes to 1 hour.
    10. While buns are rising, adjust the oven racks to lowest and lower-middle positions. Place a rimmed baking sheet on the lower rack to catch any drips. Preheat the oven to 375°.
    11. Bake buns on upper rack until lightly golden brown, about 20 minutes. Carefully tent the pan with aluminum foil to avoid further browning and bake until center of dough registers at least 200°, 12-15 minutes longer. Remove from the oven, remove the foil and let buns cool in the pan on wire rack for 5 minutes. Lightly run a butter knife around the edges of the pan, then place a rimmed baking sheet over buns and carefully invert onto the sheet. Scoop up any glaze left in the baking pan onto buns. Let cool for at least 10 minutes longer before serving (best after completely cooled, though).

    Notes

    Tips and Stuff:

    You'll notice the weights of the ingredients in the instructions.  I do weigh them to get the best results and highly recommend investing in an inexpensive kitchen scale.

    You can refrigerate the slices in the pan (before the 2nd rising) overnight, for up to 14 hours, then bake them.  To bake, remove the pan from the refrigerator and let sit until buns are puffy and touching one another, 1 to 1 1/2 hours.  Then bake as usual.

    Both of the rising times took the entire hour for me.  

    ATK recommends unsalted butter, but I use salted.  It worked fine.

    I didn't use pecans, but if you do be sure and toast them first (spread on a baking sheet, 350° for 5 or so minutes until you just smell the nuttiness).  It really makes a difference in the taste.

    Nutrition Information:
    Yield: 12Serving Size: 1 roll
    Amount Per Serving:Calories: 407Total Fat: 19gSaturated Fat: 8gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 10gCholesterol: 63mgSodium: 459mgCarbohydrates: 53gFiber: 2gSugar: 20gProtein: 7g

    Nutrition Values are Approximate

    Filed Under: All Recipes, Breads/Muffins, BreakfastTagged With: America's Test Kitchen, breakfast, caramel buns, cinnamon buns, desserts, sticky buns, sticky buns from America's Test Kitchen, sweet buns, yeast buns

    Источник: https://myrecipereviews.com/2020/03/06/sticky-buns-americas-test-kitchen/

    I have never met any person living in France who worries about baking baguettes at home. Why would anyone do so, when they can walk a few steps from the front door and find the very best examples, fresh from the oven? But when you live in the US the situation is totally different. The stuff you see sold as “baguettes” could bring Paris back to 1789. Some, if held up, will fold. Wrap your mind around that. A baguette with such poor inner structure, with so much stuff added to the dough to prolong its sorry life, that it folds under its own weight. I have a few recipes for baguette in the blog already, but decided to bite the bullet and try America’s Test Kitchen version. I say bite the bullet because, as my friend Cindy always says, their recipes ensure that you will dirty every single pan, bowl, utensil you have. They don’t cut corners. They create them. In the case of their baguettes, the issue is not so much messing up stuff, but the timing and super detailed instructions. You can find the full recipe in their site, I will give just a very minimal overview, as I could not get permission to publish their method.

    FRENCH BAGUETTES
    (from America’s Test Kitchen)

    ¼ cup (1⅓ ounces) whole-wheat flour
    3 cups (15 ounces) all-purpose flour
    1 teaspoon instant yeast
    1 teaspoon diastatic malt powder (optional)
    1½ teaspoons salt
    1½ cups (12 ounces) water

    OVERVIEW OF THE METHOD

    Make a dough with all ingredients by kneading with a mixer for about 7 minutes. Leave it at room temperature and knead by folding three times, letting the dough rest for 30 minutes in between folding cycles. Refrigerate overnight.

    Remove dough from fridge, divide in half, work with half the dough at a time. Follow their precise measurements to obtain four portions of dough.


    They will instruct you to pre-shape the dough, minimizing how much you handle it, and with a lot of waiting time in between each manipulation, including the final shaping and stretching to a size compatible with home ovens.

    After a final rise of 45 to 60 minutes, the baguettes will be ready for a 500F oven, baked for 5 minutes covered with a disposable aluminum baking pan (excellent method to create steam), and uncovered for the final 15 minutes for proper browning.

    for full recipe, visit this site

    You will be able to bake two baguettes at a time. I did not bother retarding the two last baguettes in the fridge, as the baking takes a reasonably short time.  Overall, it is a good recipe, just pretty convoluted in terms of all the instructions given for handling the dough.

    The inner crumb had the uneven holes that are the mark of a good baguette, but I expected a slightly more open structure. Taste was pretty spectacular, I think the proportion of whole wheat and all-purpose flour is perfect.  I will probably do a few changes in the way I shaped it, because I suppose a bit more surface tension could be better, two of the baguettes were not as round as I would like.

    America’s Test Kitchen insists they should be consumed within 3 to 4 hours. I beg to differ, and find that they freeze quite well and a small visit in a toaster oven brings them back to life…

    ONE YEAR AGO:Sad Times

    TWO YEARS AGO:Slow-Cooker Carnitas Lettuce Wraps and Paleo Planet Review

     

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    America's Test Kitchen, baguettes, bread, French baguettes, homemade baguettes

    Does the universe need another recipe for Chocolate Chip Cookies?  

    Let me think about that for a second….

    The answer is obviously YES!

    A few months ago I ordered the book Naturally Sweet from America’s Test Kitchen. “Bake all your classics with 30 to 50% less sugar.”  I do trust them to develop recipes that do not lack in taste. They definitely test all variables tirelessly, and I’ve never had a bad outcome. Yes, sometimes every single pot and pan in the kitchen gets dirty, but… if you don’t mind doing dishes – I definitely do not – it’s not that big a deal.   My first adventure with the book, a real American classic: chocolate chip cookies. And no, you won’t dirty a ton of dishes. Surprisingly enough, it is a one-bowl adventure.

     

    OVERVIEW OF THE RECIPE

    Butter is creamed with sucanat, a type of sugar that I mentioned recently in my In My Kitchen post. As you open the bag, the smell is enough to make you dream. Think brown sugar with benefits. The texture is different from any other sugar I’ve played with. Coarse, a bit harsh-looking. It will not cream the same way white or brown sugar will, it offers a bit more resistance to the blade of the mixer. Do not worry about it, just keep beating for 3 minutes or so.

    One egg and one egg yolk are added, then the other regular suspects, flour, leavening agents, vanilla, and finally Ghirardelli 60% cocoa in pieces, not too small, you need to go for those assertive pieces as you bite into these babies.

    America’s Test Kitchen is quite reluctant to give permission to share recipes online, and I gave up on that waiting game.  If you don’t have the book, the recipe is available online here.  By the way, Sally’s site is a must-visit, and her cookbooks great too.

     

    Comments:I really like these cookies. Phil defined them pretty well:

    They have this texture that at first you think it’s crunchy, then you think it’s chewy,
    and then you realize it’s in a perfect spot in between…

    Got it?  Well, I think the cookies will please both camps, although I am partial to the Chewy Cheerleading Team. The sucanat gives a very nice sweetness, reminding me of some cookies that call for brown butter to be incorporated in the dough. That type of added complexity.  It makes about 16 cookies (I actually managed to get 17).  I don’t think it’s a good idea to try and make them smaller, they will have the perfect texture baked exactly as ATK suggests. Indeed, those guys test their formulas. Extensively. And we all profit from their work. I took them to the department and was considering grabbing one mid-morning, but found the empty platter staring at me. It was 9:48am. That is the sign of a good batch of cookies.

    ONE YEAR AGO:Little Bites of Paradise

    TWO YEARS AGO:Maple-Glazed Pumpkin Bread

    THREE YEARS AGO:In My Kitchen, October 2014

    FOUR YEARS AGO:Grilled Steelhead Trout

    FIVE YEARS AGO: Brown Butter Tomato Salad

    SIX YEARS AGO:Spelt and Cornmeal Rolls

    SEVEN YEARS AGO:Roasted Potato and Olive Focaccia

    EIGHT YEARS AGO:Multigrain Bread Extraordinaire

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    America's Test Kitchen, baking with less sugar, chocolate, chocolate chip cookies, cookies, delicious choc chip cookies, sucanat

    My love affair with America’s Test Kitchen only grows stronger and stronger… I’ve been making a lot of their recipes without a single disappointment (insert discreet knock on wood).  Pork stir-fry can be pretty tricky to prepare. More often than not the meat either turns out too dry or too greasy, and the flavors fail to mingle well.  Cook’s Illustrated to the rescue.  They tackle the many issues with this preparation by using boneless country-style pork ribs, and soaking the pieces of meat in a solution of baking soda. Baking soda acts by raising the pH (decreasing acidity), therefore affecting the charges present in protein molecules, which in turn changes the way the molecules interact with each other. With a raise in pH, the protein strands unfold and relax, in other words, the meat becomes considerably more tender. If you take the process too far, either by using a huge amount of baking soda or by allowing the meat to sit for too long in its presence, you’ll end up with mushy meat.  But when performed correctly it results in meat with fantastic texture. ATK also incorporated a coating with cornstarch before stir-frying, which helps retain moisture as the meat cooks. Genius, right? As to the sauce that finalizes the dish, they use ketchup and fish sauce to up the level of glutamates, giving it a boost in flavor.

    Seems simple and straightforward enough. In fact, the dish comes together quite quickly once you do the initial prep of the meat, so have all your ingredients ready, and get busy… Dinner will be served in no time!

    Pork Stir Fry ATK

    SICHUAN PORK IN GARLIC SAUCE

    (reprinted with permission from America’s Test Kitchen via Cook’s Illustrated)

    for the sauce:
    1/2 cup low-sodium chicken broth
    2 tablespoons sugar
    2 tablespoons soy sauce 
    4 teaspoons Chinese black vinegar
    1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil
    1 tablespoon Chinese rice wine or dry sherry
    2 teaspoons ketchup
    2 teaspoons fish sauce
    2 teaspoons cornstarch

    for the meat:
    12 ounces boneless country-style pork ribs, trimmed
    1 teaspoon baking soda
    1/2 cup cold water
    2 teaspoons Chinese rice wine or dry sherry
    2 teaspoons cornstarch

    for the stir-fry:
    4 garlic cloves, minced
    2 scallions, white parts minced, green parts sliced thin
    2 tablespoons Asian broad-bean chili paste
    4 tablespoons vegetable oil
    6 ounces shiitake mushrooms, stemmed and sliced thin
    2 celery ribs, cut on bias into 1/4-inch slices

    For the sauce: Whisk all ingredients together in bowl; set aside.

    For the pork: Cut pork into 2-inch lengths, then cut each length into 1/4-inch match sticks. Combine pork with baking soda and water in bowl. Let sit at room temperature for 15 minutes. Rinse pork in cold water. Drain well and pat dry with paper towels. Whisk rice wine and cornstarch in bowl. Add pork and toss to coat.

    For the stir-fry: combine garlic, scallion whites, and chili paste in bowl. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in 12-inch nonstick skillet over high heat until just smoking. Add mushrooms and cook, stirring frequently, until tender, 2 to 4 minutes. Add celery and continue to cook until celery is crisp-tender, 2 to 4 minutes. Transfer vegetables to separate bowl.

    Add remaining 3 tablespoons oil to now-empty skillet and place over medium-low heat. Add garlic-scallion mixture and cook, stirring frequently, until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Transfer 1 tablespoon garlic-scallion oil to small bowl and set aside. Add pork to skillet and cook, stirring frequently, until no longer pink, 3 to 5 minutes. Whisk sauce mixture to recombine and add to skillet. Increase heat to high and cook, stirring constantly, until sauce is thickened and pork is cooked through, 1 to 2 minutes. Return vegetables to skillet and toss to combine. Transfer to serving platter, sprinkle with scallion greens and reserved garlic-scallion oil, and serve.
    .
    ENJOY!
    .

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    America's Test Kitchen, Cook's Illustrated, pork stir fry, Sichuan pork
    Источник: https://bewitchingkitchen.com/tag/americas-test-kitchen/

    Top Chef Family Style

    Names[4]Ages Relationship[4]Hometown[4]Kiran Alwy & Moid Alwy 14, 42 Daughter & Father St. Louis Park, MinnesotaMilan Bhayana & Chandrani Ghosh 15, 50 Son & Mother Chevy Chase, MarylandKhalil Blue & Willie Blue 13, 41 Son & Father Houston, TexasAinsley Crouse & Hayley Crouse 11, 40 Daughter & Mother Douglassville, PennsylvaniaJack Cruickshank & Bobbie Lopez 12, 51 Son & Mother Phoenix, ArizonaTaylor Ellison & Elizabeth Frame Ellison 9, 38 Son & Mother San Francisco, CaliforniaDelilah Flores & Daniel "Danny" Flores 13, 24 Niece & Uncle Ontario, CaliforniaKaj Friis-Hecht & Liz Thorpe 14, 42 Nephew & Aunt New Orleans, LouisianaOcean Kanekoa & Jaydene Kanekoa 15, 34 Brother & Sister Kamuela, HawaiiEva Kopelman & Jenn Kopelman 14, 55 Daughter & Mother Long Island, New YorkAnika Kumar & Anupama "Anu" Kumar 12, 46 Daughter & Mother Palo Alto, CaliforniaBrooke Nathanson & Carol Weiss 12, 75 Granddaughter & Grandmother Ashland, MassachusettsKennedy Torres & Rosie Torres 15, 41 Daughter & Mother Palmer, Alaska
    Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Top_Chef_Family_Style

    No-Knead Sourdough Bread

    I have been sharing quite a few sourdough recipes… and I have quite a few more. 😉 I made many of these baked goods while waiting for my sourdough starter to become fully active- which took a full month!

    Now it’s (finally) time to share the most simple and delicious sourdough bread recipe I’ve made thus far. It is a sourdough version of the famous Dutch oven “no-knead” bread. Heavenly.

    The recipe is from America’s Test Kitchen. I weighed the ingredients. I liked that the bread bakes on a piece of parchment paper inside the Dutch oven which is an improvement from the classic Sullivan Street No-Knead Bread. The preparation process begins the night before baking the loaf.

    Yield: 1 large round loaf

    Time: 1 1/4 hours, plus 14 hours resting

    • 18.3 oz (3 2/3 cups) all-purpose flour (preferably King Arthur or substitute any brand bread flour)
    • 1 3/4 tsp fine sea salt or coarse salt
    • 12.6 oz (1 1/2 cups plus 4 tsp) water, room temperature
    • 3 oz (1/3 cup) mature sourdough starter
    1. Ideally, feed your starter the morning you are planning to make the dough. Leave it at room temperature for up to 12 hours. (I weighed and fed 3oz of starter with equal parts water and flour and left it loosely covered at room temperature for 10 -12 hours.)
    2. Whisk flour and salt together in medium bowl. (I try to start the process at 7pm)
    3. Whisk room-temperature water and starter in large bowl until smooth.
    4. Add flour mixture to water mixture and stir using wooden spoon, scraping up dry flour from bottom of bowl until dough comes together, then knead by hand in bowl until shaggy ball forms and no dry flour remains.
    5. Cover bowl with plastic wrap and let sit at room temperature for at least 12 hours or up to 18 hours.
    6. Lay 12 by 12-inch sheet of parchment paper on counter and spray generously with vegetable oil spray.
    7. Transfer dough to lightly floured counter and knead 10 to 15 times. (I lightly flour my hands as well.)
    8. Shape dough into ball by pulling edges into middle. (For the best rise, you want to create a smooth, round, somewhat taut top.)
    9. Transfer dough, seam side down, to center of parchment.
    10. Pick up dough by lifting parchment edges and lower into heavy-bottomed Dutch oven. Cover with plastic wrap.
    11. Adjust oven rack to middle position and place a metal loaf or cake pan in bottom of oven.
    12. Place pot on middle rack and pour 3 cups of boiling water into pan below.
    13. Close oven door and let dough rise until doubled in size and does not readily spring back when poked with your floured finger, 2 to 3 hours.
    14. Remove pot and water pan from oven; discard plastic from pot.
    15. Lightly flour top of dough (I use a small sieve) and, using razor blade, kitchen shears, or sharp knife, make one 7-inch-long, 1/2-inch-deep slit along top of dough. (Using kitchen shears, I made a large # on the top of the dough instead.)
    16. Cover pot and place on middle rack in oven.
    17. Heat oven to 425 degrees. Bake bread for 30 minutes (start timing as soon as you turn on the oven).
    18. Remove lid and continue to bake until loaf is deep brown and registers 210 degrees, 20 to 30 minutes longer. (I baked mine for an additional 22 minutes.)
    19. Carefully remove bread from pot; transfer to wire rack and let cool completely before serving.

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    About [email protected]

    I live in Stony Brook, New York on Long Island. I love garlic and baking. My hobby (and love) is to try new recipes. My favorite recipe resources include The New York Times, Food and Wine, Bon Appetit, and Martha Stewart Living. Enjoy!

    View all posts by [email protected]

    Источник: https://thebrookcook.wordpress.com/2020/05/27/no-knead-sourdough-bread/

    When:
    Tuesday, May 12, 2020 12:00p -
    1:30p

    Where:
    https://www.wbur.org/events/582671/quarantine-sourdough-starters-at-home Zoom via WBUR
    Surrounding areas
    Boston, MA

    EventScheduled OnlineEventAttendanceMode

    Admission:
    FREE

    Categories:
    Classes, Food, Virtual & Streaming

    Event website:
    https://www.wbur.org/events/582671/quarantine-sourdough-starters-at-home

    Join Andrea Shea, reporter for WBUR's The ARTery, and America's Test Kitchen's Andrew Janjigian for a look into creating sourdough starters from scratch. Since the beginning of quarantine, yeast packets have flown off the shelves as people bake more and more bread at home. Andrew Janjigian will walk viewers through the process of creating your own sourdough starter, the old fashioned way.

    This is part of The ARTery's Living Room Livestream, a virtual series that highlights artists who are creating during the coronavirus epidemic.

    This livestreamed event is free and open to the public, but advance registration is requested.

    Want to submit questions before the event? Go to slido.com and enter event code #YEAST to send them to us.

    Источник: https://www.thebostoncalendar.com/events/quarantine-sourdough-starter-with-atk-s-andrew-janjigian

    America's Test Kitchen's Rosemary Focaccia Bread

    do have to plan ahead since you have to make the biga (aka preferment, starter, poolish) 8-24 hours before the rest of the dough and there’s a lot of waiting time in between each of the steps. The time used to all the bread to rest and rise basically replaces you having to knead the dough. Gluten will naturally form in time and through a little bit of folding. This becomes in a way a no knead bread. Rest assured that the bread will continue to rise in the oven in a process called the oven spring. The oven spring is the bread's last hurrah where it rises once last time before the yeast dies in the heat of the oven.
    Putting together the Focaccia Biga
    Putting together the Focaccia Biga

    After making several breads, there’s a point once a bread is done and you let it cool that you cut into it. I call this the Moment of Truth because it’s hard to gauge how the bread will turn out. Yes, you do have a thermometer to make sure that the center of the bread hits 200-210 degrees Fahrenheit, but there’s always going to be that sense of suspense and uncertainty right before you cut into it when you see whether Santa left you a nice little present or a lump of coal. The instant read thermometer did register the magic number of 210 degrees exactly when I took it out of the oven and the crust was crisp and wasn’t hard. Allow me to say that it came out perfectly: the center was cooked all the way through and the crumb structure was just immaculate. I find that focaccia bread gives you a nice looking crumb with plenty of air bubbles, a common characteristic of artisan breads. Not only that but when I took my first bite, I just felt like I was in heaven - yes it was THAT good. I actually made this focaccia bread to complement the eggplant parmesan I made as well for a nice Sunday Italian dinner, but in actuality this focaccia would go well with any Italian dish: fettuccine alfredo, spaghetti with meatballs, tortellini, cheese ravioli, lasagna, etc.

    Yeast eating sugars and releasing air bubbles
    Focaccia Biga the morning after being made: the holes indicate the yeast is working by eating the sugars and releasing air bubbles for flavor.

    The difference between this focaccia bread and other focaccia breads is that the crust is crisp and gives a good crunch. Other focaccia breads have a soft crust with almost a fluffy, sponge-like texture. I have nothing against that type of focaccia bread which is the type that I would most likely encounter. I personally don't know why some focaccias come out that way and why others come out crunchy, but I do like both kinds. My theory is the high hydration level of the dough.

    Italian Focaccia Bread sprinkled with coarse sea salt and garlic
    Italian Focaccia Bread sprinkled with coarse sea salt and garlic

    I wouldn't change much in this recipe. The bread came out how I expected with good flavor and texture. I just added some coarse sea salt and some garlic as a topping [Update 9-6-13: I put 2 heaping teaspoons of fresh, minced garlic in the dough because the garlic tended to burn when sprinkled on top. What also works is to heat the olive oil with a few cloves of garlic in a sauce pan giving you garlic infused olive oil and then mincing the garlic and incorporating it into the dough]. Rosemary has that distinct piney and earthy flavor, and I would lessen the amount of rosemary because I didn't want the rosemary flavor to be too overwhelming.

    Crumb structure of the Focaccia
    The Crumb Structure of my Focaccia Bread

    In terms of the process of making the focaccia bread, instead of going through the trouble of putting the dough on a floured surface, having to handle such a wet and sticky dough, and splitting the dough into 2 round pans, I would actually just use 1 pan for the entire dough. The reason for this is because it could be very difficult when doing step 4 of the recipe below. When you watch the accompanying video, your dough will NOT turn out the way that America's Test Kitchen chef Becky Hays. Your dough will have the consistency like that of pancake batter.

    ATK Focaccia dough in one pan
    Focaccia Dough if you were to use one rimmed baking sheet instead of 2 round pans.

    Instead what you should do is just oil up a rectangular rimmed baking sheet and just pour out the batter straight from the mixing bowl using an oiled spatula. Because I found it difficult handling the wet dough (putting it onto a floured surface, halving it, and putting each half into a separate pan), this allows you to bypass that altogether. The only time you would have to handle the dough is when the dough is already on your baking sheet and once the top of the dough is well oiled (and your fingers are oiled too), it'll be easy to spread the dough out to fill out more of your rectangular baking sheet. Most focaccia breads I've seen are cooked on rectangular baking sheets.

    Making 1 large focaccia instead of 2 small ones
    Common in Italy to make 1 large Focaccia instead of 2 smaller ones

    FlavorFool's Notes

  • The dough for focaccia bread is extremely wet. It is so wet that this dough is virtually impossible to knead. Because of the high hydration of this dough, you have to be very delicate and gentle when handling it. No one told me that making focaccia was like trying to diffuse a plutonium bomb...no sudden movements, only precise and surgical motions in the presence of daunting circumstances. The recipe says to use a liberal amount of flour to dust your work surface and your hands. Do dust your work surface with flour, but I recommend that you coat your hands with olive oil instead of flour. The dough has a lesser chance of sticking to your hands when handling it and putting it into the pans.
  • My biga looked more wet than in the video, but I was still able to make it work.
  • I know that every oven is different, but this recipe becomes fully baked after 28-30 minutes. However, at this time, the outer crust of the bread becomes too crisp and the inside crumb is no longer soft and chewy. I suggest cutting the time by 5 minutes or so.
  • Because this recipe lacks fat (other than the olive oil used to brush the surface), it’ll go stale quickly. Fat in the form of butter, oil, milk, etc. makes a bread last longer. After a few hours, you can already taste the staleness setting in, so be sure to eat right away or freeze. You can always warm it up in the oven.
  • The recipe calls for 2 tbsp of olive oil in the pan that you would use to coat both sides of the dough (see accompanying video). Because of the delicate nature of the dough, I only put 1 tbsp of olive oil in the pan and brushed the 2nd tbsp of olive oil over the top. I wanted to avoid over handling the dough.
  • I added fresh minced garlic that I used as a topping in addition to the fresh rosemary that was used. Instead of adding salt to the bottom of the pan, I ended up sprinkling a pinch of coarse sea salt on top similar to what you would see on a traditional Bavarian Pretzel. When it comes to focaccia bread, I like it plenty salty and garlicky. I found if you used the amount of fresh rosemary as the recipe indicates, the rosemary overpowers everything else, so go easy on the rosemary. Other common toppings for a focaccia bread include sun dried tomatoes, parmesan cheese, shallots, salami, caramelized onions, kalamata olives, gorgonzola cheese (the Italian version of blue cheese), grapes, raisins, etc.
  • I find that when making bread, portioning out the flour can get messy with flour spilling onto the counters as you're scooping it out since my flour jar opening is quite small when putting in a measuring cup or it's filled to the brim. In either case, flour always finds a way to get spilled when scooping. In this recipe, you have to do it twice - once for the biga (1/2 cup flour) and then another time for the rest of the bread (flour). To minimize the amount of scooping and spilling of flour, I just portion out the entire amount of flour used in the recipe (3 cups) and put it in a bowl that is big enough and then set it aside. Then from those 3 cups, I portion out 1/2 cup flour for the biga and put it in a bowl of equal size. I then add the water and yeast to the smaller porton to make my biga. When the next day comes and it's time to prepare the rest of the bread, I'll already have the remaining 2.5 cups of flour measured out and all I'll need to do is add that to my biga. I no longer have to go through the trouble of portioning out another 2.5 cups of flour from the flour jar and cleaning up the spilled flour on the counter since it's already done.
  • I find it easier to pour out the dough onto 1 larger rectangular rimmed baking sheet instead of having to handle the dough to halve it and putting it into 2 smaller round pans. This saves you from having to handle the gentle and wet dough too much. Handling extremely wet dough to me is such a pain.
  • Rosemary Focaccia Recipe

    America's Test Kitchen - season 11 episode 22, Simply Italian
    Makes two 9-inch round loaves

    Ingredients

    If you don’t have a baking stone, bake the bread on an overturned, preheated rimmed baking sheet set on the upper-middle oven rack. The bread can be kept for up to 2 days well wrapped at room temperature or frozen for 2 months wrapped in foil and placed in a zipper-lock bag.

    Ingredients
    Biga
    1/2 cup (2 1/2 oz) unbleached all-purpose flour
    1/4 tsp instant or rapid-rise yeast
    1/3 cup (2 2/3 oz) warm water (100-110 degrees F)

    Dough
    1 1/4 cups (10 oz) warm water (100-110 degrees F)
    2 1/2 cups (12 1/2 oz) unbleached all-purpose flour, plus extra for shaping
    2 tsp Kosher salt
    1 tsp instant or rapid-rise yeast
    4 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
    2 tbsp chopped fresh rosemary [this is way too much so I used about 1 tsp for both loaves]

    Instructions

    1. FOR THE BIGA: Combine flour, water, and yeast in large bowl and stir with wooden spoon until uniform mass forms and no dry flour remains, about 1 minute. Cover bowl tightly with plastic wrap and let stand at room temperature (about 70 degrees) overnight (at least 8 hours and up to 24 hours.) Use immediately or store in refrigerator for up to 3 days (allow to stand at room temperature 30 minutes before proceeding with recipe.)

    2. FOR THE DOUGH: Stir flour, water, and yeast into biga with wooden spoon until uniform mass forms and no dry flour remains, about 1 minute. Cover with plastic wrap and let rise at room temperature for 15 minutes.

    3. Sprinkle 2 teaspoons salt over dough; stir into dough until thoroughly incorporated, about 1 minute. Cover with plastic wrap and let rise at room temperature 30 minutes. Spray rubber spatula or bowl scraper with nonstick cooking spray; fold partially risen dough over itself by gently lifting and folding edge of dough toward middle. Turn bowl 90 degrees; fold again. Turn bowl and fold dough 6 more times (total of 8 turns). Cover with plastic wrap and let rise for 30 minutes. Repeat folding, turning, and rising 2 more times, for total of three 30-minute rises. Meanwhile, adjust oven rack to upper-middle position, place baking stone on rack, and heat oven to 500 degrees at least 30 minutes before baking.

    4. Gently transfer dough to lightly floured counter. Lightly dust top of dough with flour and divide in half. Shape each piece of dough into 5-inch round by gently tucking under edges. Coat two 9-inch round cake pans with 2 tablespoons [I used 1 tbsp to coat the pan and I brushed the other tbsp on top] olive oil each. Sprinkle each pan with ½ teaspoon kosher salt [I didn't do this but instead sprinkled a pinch of coarse sea salt on top]. Place round of dough in pan, top side down; slide dough around pan to coat bottom and sides, then flip over. Repeat with second piece of dough. Cover pans with plastic wrap and let rest for 5 minutes.

    5. Using fingertips, press dough out toward edges of pan. (If dough resists stretching, let it relax for 5 to 10 minutes before trying again.) Using dinner fork, poke surface of dough 25 to 30 times, popping any large bubbles. Sprinkle rosemary evenly over top of dough. Let dough rest until slightly bubbly, 5 to 10 minutes.

    6. Place pans on baking stone and reduce oven temperature to 450 degrees. Bake until tops are golden brown, 25 to 28 minutes, switching placement of pans halfway through baking. Transfer pans to wire rack and let cool 5 minutes. Remove loaves from pan and return to wire rack. Brush tops with any oil remaining in pan. Let cool 30 minutes before serving.


    Video: Chef Becky Hays Making Rosemary Focaccia Bread on America's Test Kitchen

    Источник: http://www.madeinmykitchen.com/2012/09/americas-test-kitchens-rosemary.html

    2 Replies to “Americas test kitchen sourdough”

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