top 50 investment banks uk

see a list of the investments available with Fidelity from the top 100 FTSE shares Hargreaves Lansdown plc, Investment Banking & Investment Services. And brutally unforgiving: while 50 things need to go right, one slip up can bury a deal. 2) Niraj Karia, 33. Senior VP, Kotak Mahindra Capital. On Investment Banking · Top 50 Investment Banks - Which Investment Bank Should You Apply To? · TOP 20 INVESTMENT BANKS (in alphabetical order) ​.

Top 50 investment banks uk -

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Top Investment Banks

When it comes to the top investment banks, I’m a huge fan of ranking everything imaginable.

From schools to restaurants to investment banks, what’s the point of life unless you’re constantly comparing yourself to others?

Just kidding – it’s a massive waste of time.

Despite that, it is helpful to know about the different types of banks, especially since the categories have changed over time.

And while it’s stupid to “rank the banks,” it is helpful to understand the trade-offs of working at firms in different categories.

Warnings and Disclaimers

First, this article is less of a ranking and more of a classification of the top investment banks.

As you’ll see, many of the groups “rank” at about the same level.

Second, do not judge yourself based on any online list or discussion, including this one.

Finally, before you freak out and start wondering why I did not mention your bank, realize that it is impossible to mention every bank in the world.

The examples here are representative, not comprehensive.

Categories of Top Investment Banks

Here are the rough categories:

  • Bulge Bracket Investment Banks (BBs) – JP Morgan, Goldman Sachs, and Morgan Stanley; Bank of America Merrill Lynch and Citi; Credit Suisse and Barclays; Deutsche Bank and UBS.
  • In-Between-a-Banks (IBABs) – Wells Fargo, RBC, and many European, Asian, and Canadian banks, such as HSBC, BNP Paribas, Mizuho, Nomura, BMO, and CITIC.
  • Elite Boutique Investment Banks (EBs) – Centerview, Evercore, Greenhill (??), Guggenheim (??), Lazard, Moelis, Perella Weinberg, PJT Partners (formerly Blackstone), Qatalyst, and Rothschild (only in Europe).

There’s some disagreement over the exact firms in this list, so I’ve added question marks or notes after ones with uncertainty. See the detailed article for more on this topic.

  • Up-and-Coming Elite Boutique Investment Banks (UCEBs) – LionTree Advisors, Zaoui & Co., Robey Warshaw, Lakeside Capital Advisers, Dyal Co, and M. Klein & Co.
  • Middle Market Banks (MMs) – Baird, Brown Gibbons Lang & Commpany, Cowen, Harris Williams, Houlihan Lokey, Janney, Jefferies, JMP, Lincoln International, Macquarie, Needham, Oppenheimer, Piper Sandler, PJ Solomon, Raymond James, Stephens, Stifel, Truist, Wedbush, and William Blair.

This list is also a bit controversial because there’s a thin line between “boutique” and “middle market.” Also, I have no idea where Macquarie should go.

  • Industry-Specific Boutiques (ISBs) – SVB Leerink (Healthcare), Ziegler (Healthcare, Senior Living, and Education), FT Partners (Fintech), Raine Group (kind of – it’s also a merchant bank), Allen & Co. (TMT), Seabury (Transportation/Maritime/Aerospace & Defense), Telsey Advisory Group (Consumer/Retail), and dozens of others.
  • Regional Boutique Banks (RBs) – Too many to list; if a bank operates in only 1-2 locations or smaller non-financial centers and works on very small deals, it’s in this category.
  • Other Banks (Merchant Banks, Hybrid Firms, and KPOs) – BDT Capital Partners, Tudor Pickering Holt & Co., Raine Group, Three Ocean Partners, and Lepe Partners.

Particularly in the “In-Between-a-Bank” (IBAB) category, I have left out many names because I don’t want to list 50+ banks.

So, please do not leave angry comments wondering why Société Générale, Crédit Agricole, or the other Big 5 Canadian banks are not there.

In addition to the detailed articles on BB, EB, and MM banks, we also cover boutique investment banks in a separate article.

How Are the Top Investment Banks Different?

Size is the most obvious difference, but that’s not the best way to think about these categories: Many tiny firms end up working on mega-deals these days.

Instead, you can use these four criteria:

  • Deal Size: Does the bank work on deals worth less than $100 million USD? Or mostly deals below or above $1 billion?
  • Geography: Do they have a presence only in one city or region? Are they global? Are they strong in Europe but not North America or Asia?
  • Services Provided: Do they only advise on M&A deals, or do they also work on debt (DCM) and equity (ECM) deals? Do they also do Restructuring? Or does the bank focus on private placements?
  • Exit Opportunities: Where do bankers at this firm move to afterward? Are mega-fund PE exits common, or are middle-market funds, other banks, or normal companies more common?

There are some other differences as well – for example, you often earn more at elite boutiques than at bulge bracket banks. But it’s easiest to start with the four criteria above.

Bulge Bracket Investment Banks (BBs)

These are the largest global banks that operate in all regions and offer all services – M&A, equity, debt, and others – to clients.

They also have sales & trading, research, wealth management, and all the other financial services you could imagine.

They tend to work on the largest deals, usually those above $1 billion USD in size, though they sometimes go lower than that depending on the market.

Over time, asplit has developed in this group, with the “Top 3” (GS, MS, and JPM) performing better than the rest.

The European banks have also moved away from investment banking and toward wealth management and other businesses, which has hurt their prospects.

Some people even argue that firms like UBS shouldn’t be on this list anymore, but I’m not sure I would go that far.

Analysts at the bulge bracket banks get into private equity firms and hedge funds of all sizes, but they’re more likely to do so if they’re in non-ECM/DCM teams, such as strong industry groups, M&A, or Leveraged Finance.

In-Between-a-Banks (IBABs)

These firms are often strong in one specific product, such as debt, but don’t do as much business in other areas.

They also tend to work on smaller deals, overall, than the bulge brackets, but these deals are still bigger than what middle market and boutique banks work on.

Wells Fargo is the classic example of the “In-Between-a-Bank”: Technically, it’s not a bulge bracket, but it’s also not a boutique or middle market firm.

It’s strong in debt and ranks among the top banks there, but doesn’t do as much M&A advisory business.

Many of these firms also tend to be strong in one region, such as Europe for the French banks or Japan for the Japanese banks, but don’t do as well elsewhere.

You can win the traditional exit opportunities coming from these banks, but it’s safe to say that fewer Analysts get into the largest buy-side funds, and more tend to move to other banks, smaller funds, or normal companies.

Elite Boutique Investment Banks (EBs)

These firms, with a few exceptions, focus on M&A Advisory and Restructuring rather than debt and equity, and they often work on the same deals that the bulge brackets advise on.

You’ll see at least one elite boutique on almost any huge M&A deal in the U.S. or Europe.

Despite that, these firms are still much smaller than the bulge brackets.

If a BB hires hundreds of new Analysts each year, an EB might hire only a few dozen.

Unlike true regional boutiques, the EBs have a presence in many regions, but often they are strongest in one place.

Rothschild, for example, is easily an elite boutique in Europe but isn’t quite as strong in the U.S.

Many Analysts from elite boutiques exit into the largest PE funds and hedge funds, and the success percentage tends to be high simply because there are fewer applicants.

However, there’s also a lot of variation in this category: Evercore, Lazard, and Moelis Analysts seem to place well, while there’s more uncertainty around some of the others.

Also, some of these firms place a heavy emphasis on internal promotions and keeping bankers “for life,” which makes exit opportunities tougher.

Up-and-Coming Elite Boutiques (UCEBs)

The main difference between UCEBs and EBs is that theUCEBs have much less of a track record.

They’re often founded by high-profile rainmakers at BBs or EBs, and they frequently work with their previous clients.

They’re even smaller than elite boutiques, they have less of a geographic presence, and they’re more dependent on a key individual(s).

Sometimes these firms fizzle out, but they can also keep growing and eventually become true elite boutiques.

Exit opportunities are unclear because of the lack of data. It seems possible to win traditional PE/HF roles, but the probability is lower.

Middle Market Banks (MMs)

Similar to the bulge bracket banks, middle market banks also offer a variety of services and have a wide geographical presence, but they work on smaller deals.

Most deals are below $1 billion, though this varies a bit by the bank; some, such as Jefferies, tend to work on larger deals than the other MM banks.

You can exit to private equity firms and hedge funds coming from these firms, but it’s more difficult because Analysts at the BBs, IBABs, and EBs tend to get priority.

Also, the buy-side recruiting process at mid-sized-to-large-funds moves insanely quickly, and it’s tough to get “plugged in” if you’re at a smaller bank.

So, the most likely exit opportunities from here are:

Industry-Specific Boutique Banks (ISBs)

As the name suggests, these firms focus on one specific industry, such as healthcare or FIG, and often on M&A advisory deals within that industry.

These firms have a smaller geographical footprint than the others above, and they work on smaller deals than the BBs, IBABs, and EBs.

Deals are often comparable in size to the ones that MM banks work on, but that varies widely based on the reputation of the boutique.

As one specific example, SVB Leerink, a top healthcare boutique, has mostly worked on equity and M&A deals for less than $500 million USD, with a few larger M&A deals.

That is more like “upper-middle-market” territory.

It’s tougher to win traditional exit opportunities from these banks, as they tend to favor internal promotions and keeping Analysts and Associates around for the long term.

Regional Boutique Banks (RBs)

Finally, these firms are very small and tend to operate in only one city, or perhaps a few cities outside of major financial centers.

They don’t necessarily focus on one industry, but they often focus on a small set of industries; they also tend to do mostly M&A deals and private placements.

Deal sizes vary, but many of these firms work on deals worth less than $50 million USD, and sometimes ones worth less than $20-30 million.

Exit opportunities are tough if you’re at one of these banks, and advancement is also tricky because there’s often no room to advance.

I haven’t seen firsthand examples of Analysts from these firms moving directly into private equity or hedge funds, but it’s possible, in theory.

The most likely exits are larger banks, Big 4 firms, or finance roles at normal companies.

Other Categories Of Bank

Finally, there are other categories of banks.

Merchant banks, for example, operate as combined private equity firms and investment banks, offering advisory services and also investing in companies.

These firms are more common in emerging markets where people care less about conflicts of interest.

In India, “knowledge process outsourcing,” or KPO, firms do similar work for many banks.

They’ll create pitch books, crunch numbers, and do other tasks that the global banks prefer to outsource.

There are also hybrid firms that do a combination of consulting and investment banking, especially in areas like Restructuring.

If you want to work at a large bank or win a traditional exit opportunity, you’re better off going to a real investment bank than one of these firms.

There are some exceptions to that rule, but mostly in specialized fields (e.g., turnaround consulting can lead to Restructuring roles at elite boutiques).

So, Which Top Investment Bank Should You Work At?

That’s completely the wrong question.

You should be asking which banks you have a realistic chance of working at.

For example, if you just graduated, you earned a 3.2 GPA (or a 2:2 with low A-Levels in the U.K.), and you only became interested in investment banking last month, you are not going to win offers at bulge brackets, elite boutiques, or middle market banks.

You’ll have to target regional boutiques or small PE firms that might be open to off-cycle interns.

Or, maybe you skip banking altogether and go for independent valuation firms, Big 4 firms, or related roles.

On the other hand, if you’re at Princeton, you have a 4.0 GPA, and you’ve done two previous boutique IB internships, then you have a good chance at everything above.

If you have the option to do so, it’s almost always best to work at an elite boutique or bulge bracket because you get the best deal experience and exit opportunities.

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Working at an IBAB is also a solid option, and even MM banks are fine if you win offers there.

You have to be careful with Up-and-Coming Elite Boutiques (UCEBs); I’m not sure I would recommend them over the others unless you’re certain you want to stay in IB long term.

Similarly, you have to be careful with Industry-Specific Boutiques (ISBs) and Regional Boutiques (RBs) if your main motivation is the exit opportunity.

In particular, I’ve seen a lot of students suffer after joining RBs because the role often changes, deal flow dries up, or their compensation is cut.

If you have competitive offers from both a bulge bracket and an elite boutique, here’s how you can make a decision:

How certain are you that you want to stay in the finance industry for the long term?

  • Not That Certain – Take the BB offer because it will give you more options outside of finance; the brand-name recognition is much stronger.
  • Very Certain – It’s more of a toss-up, so you have to be more specific:
  • You Want to Stay in IB for the Long Term – It’s almost always better to take the EB offer because you’ll earn higher compensation and get more interesting work.
  • You Want to Move into Private Equity or Hedge Funds ASAP – It depends on your specific group. An M&A offer at an EB easily beats an ECM offer at a BB, but if you’re deciding between two strong industry groups, make a decision based on the people.

After running this site for over a decade, my opinion is that most people don’t know what they want to do.

Especially in the last few years, I’ve seen a lot of students plan to go to mega-funds, but then get burned out after six months in IB and quit to join tech companies instead.

The Bottom Line: Even though elite boutiques do offer many advantages over bulge brackets, you’re still better off going to a BB unless you’re very, very certain of your long-term plans.

For example, if you’ve done four off-cycle and summer internships at banks of different sizes and concluded that IB is your passion, sure, accept the EB offer.

But if you’ve only done one 3-month summer internship, and you have EB and BB offers, you take less of a chance by going to the bulge bracket.

Got Rankings for the Top Investment Banks?

Most people spend far too much time “ranking” banks and not enough time thinking about where they have a realistic chance of working – or what their long-term plans are.

It’s good to know how the banks differ, but it’s even better to know what fits in best with your plans and what the opportunities from each bank look like.

Do that, and you’ll quickly realize the silliness of rankings.

As soon as you finish your current list, that is.

About the Author

Brian DeChesare is the Founder of Mergers & Inquisitions and Breaking Into Wall Street. In his spare time, he enjoys memorizing obscure Excel functions, editing resumes, obsessing over TV shows, traveling like a drug dealer, and defeating Sauron.

Источник: https://www.mergersandinquisitions.com/top-investment-banks/

List of Top Banks in UK by Market Cap as on Jan 1st, 2020

List of Top Banks in UK by Market Cap as Jan 1st, 2020.
Market Value (Jan-01-2021)
Market Value (Jan 1st 2020)
Rank in Country (Jan-2021)
Company Rank in UK in 2021 is 23
Annual Results for Year Ending
Market Value (Jan-01-2021)
Market Value (Jan 1st 2020)
Rank in Country (Jan-2021)
Company Rank in UK in 2021 is 24
Annual Results for Year Ending
Market Value (Jan-01-2021)
Market Value (Jan 1st 2020)
Rank in Country (Jan-2021)
Company Rank in UK in 2021 is 217
Annual Results for Year Ending
Market Value (Jan-01-2021)
Market Value (Jan 1st 2020)
Rank in Country (Jan-2021)
Company Rank in UK in 2021 is 215
Annual Results for Year Ending
Market Value (Jan-01-2021)
Market Value (Jan 1st 2020)
Rank in Country (Jan-2021)
Company Rank in UK in 2021 is 286
Annual Results for Year Ending
Market Value (Jan-01-2021)
Market Value (Jan 1st 2020)
Rank in Country (Jan-2021)
Company Rank in UK in 2021 is 433
Annual Results for Year Ending

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Источник: https://www.value.today/top-companies/top-banks-uk

How tough is an investment banker's life?

By Jamie Robertson
Business reporter, BBC News

Image source, Getty Images

Not many people shed tears when bankers lose their jobs.

Last Monday, equities teams at Deutsche Bank offices round the world were told to leave their desks within a matter of hours.

The men and women who were made redundant had worked at one of the biggest investment banks in the world.

Some Deutsche Bank employees had not made themselves popular in recent years.

In April 2015, the bank was fined a record $2.5bn for rigging Libor, an interest rate used for interbank trades. It was also ordered to fire seven employees and was accused of being obstructive towards regulators in their investigations.

Tales of arrogance and misbehaviour abounded. Three years before, there had been reports that a member of Deutsche's staff had been suspended for allegedly waving a £10 note out of the bank's London office windows and taunting doctors and nurses marching against NHS cuts below.

'It was humiliating'

But now the culls have come round again, as they do roughly every decade in the banking industry: in 1987-89, then during the dotcom boom and bust in 1999 and 2000, then in the financial crisis and now, for some, in 2019.

Little has changed in those years in the way bankers get the sack.

Peter Hahn, the Dean & Henry Grunfeld Professor of Banking at the London Institute of Banking and Finance, worked for two of the biggest US banks during the 1980s.

He remembers coming into work and seeing colleagues being cordoned off as they arrived at the office one Monday morning, having their ID cards sliced up in front of them and being ordered to be out of the building within two hours.

Mr Hahn said: "It was humiliating. It was two weeks before Christmas and 25% of staff were laid off. Those who were sacked got two weeks' pay for every year they had worked there. Bonuses were handed out a few days after they had left to those who remained."

And where does a sacked banker go next? The obvious answer is to dive straight back into the industry.

For this generation, that might not be that easy.

The traders that were at the forefront of the cuts are among the most skilled in the industry. But unlike analysts and managers, these are not easily transferable skills. And the market is tight.

Logan Naidu, the founder and chief executive of recruitment consultancy Dartmouth Partners, said: "Deutsche has been shutting down their equities division and I don't think the market is big enough to suck up all those jobs."

And he pointed out that in an oversupplied market, Deutsche staff might not be able to command the kind of salaries they were used to.

And generally speaking, those were high.

Image source, Getty Images

Sarah Butcher, global editor of the banking careers site eFinancialCareers, says: "In the first year out of university, new hires in investment banking can expect to make £74,000 in total compensation. Six years later, as senior associates, they can expect to make £225,000.

"Aged 32, as a third-year vice-president, you should be earning £435,000 in combined salary and bonus."

But to any 20-something labouring in a less lucrative industry on, say, £35,000 a year, and intoxicated with the idea of banking riches, Ms Butcher has a word of caution: "First, you will work a lot harder in an investment bank. Think 80-plus-hour weeks, late nights and some weekends.

"Second, only the brave survive.

"It's not unusual for at least 50%, often more, of an analyst class to drop out by the time you're into associate level. Getting into a bank is hard. Getting to these pay levels is harder still."

Image source, Getty Images

But these investment bankers have one other thing on their side: contacts.

Mr Hahn tells the story of a former student who, after years working for a major US bank, arrived one morning to have his access denied and was told to vacate his desk by 10:00. He was booked to fly to Geneva that afternoon to talk to a client.

Mr Hahn said: "As he had the ticket and the hotel reservation, he decided to go anyway. He only had to pay for the taxi from the airport.

"He went to Geneva, saw the client, thanked him for all this business and told him he couldn't represent the bank any more. Then and there, the client offered him a job, starting immediately."

Image source, Getty Images

There is no shortage of new recruits to the industry. Last year, Goldman Sachs had 100,000 applicants for 500 places on its trainee programme.

Marcus (not his real name) is 25 and works as an analyst at a major US investment bank.

He works 13 to 14 hours a day and is quite happy doing so. It's not quite as much, he says, as he did when he first arrived and wanted to prove himself.

He said: "The numbers wanting to come into the industry are higher than ever. But the difference from a few years ago is that university graduates - if they want to make a lot of money - have more options.

"They can go into tech industries and they can go into start-ups, which offer what they may see as a better lifestyle, as well as a more exciting career."

Image source, Getty Images

Mr Naidu agreed, adding that even within five years, some in the banking industry are thinking of moving to more glamorous employment.

He said: "This new generation, the millennials and Generation Z, is not so worried about making money. They don't seem to want it as much as earlier ones. That may change as they get older, but at the moment, they are more prepared to look elsewhere and take risks on salaries."

Marcus added: "I am very happy in my work and can't see myself moving. But then again, I can't say for certain I will always work here, because you never know what might turn up."

Marcus will be well suited for whatever "turns up". Mr Hahn believes a training in banking in your 20s sets you up for any kind of career.

That's certainly healthy for the individual, but for the banks it has huge downsides. Mr Hahn said: "In the early 80s, when I came into banking, you expected to join a bank and stay with it for your career. What came with that was loyalty to the organisation.

"If you saw someone doing something terrible, you were prepared to do something about it, because it was a threat to the organisation. Now that loyalty has gone, and in an organisation built on risk management that is a real challenge."

More on this story

Источник: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-48936358

Overview

The banking sector in the United Kingdom is regarded as the largest in Europe and it is considered to be the fourth largest in the world. Banking in the UK is highly developed, with new entrants in the sector being driven by cutting-edge technology and innovation. It also considered being the largest financial center in the world for cross-border lending.

With a staggering amount of 40 billion payments made in 2017 alone, the UK’s banking sector has the deep penetration of banking across the country. Banks in the United Kingdom can be demonstrated by the fact that nearly the entire population of the UK has a debit card and about two-thirds of the population is said to have a credit card.

Banks in the United Kingdom

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Structure of Banks in the United Kingdom

There are different categories of banks in the UK. Each category of banks caters to varying needs, ranging from personal to business needs. Listed below are the four major categories of banks in the UK.

  1. Central bank – In the UK, the central bank is the Bank of England or BoE. The Bank of England is the central bank of the UK and also happens to the world’s eighth oldest bank. The Bank of England is tasked with setting up and maintaining the monetary policyMonetary policy refers to the steps taken by a country’s central bank to control the money supply for economic stability. For example, policymakers manipulate money circulation for increasing employment, GDP, price stability by using tools such as interest rates, reserves, bonds, etc.read more and financial stability of the country.
  2. High Street Banks – High street banks are like retail banks that have multiple branch locations. Given that these banks provide retail services, they mostly serve the general public. This means that instead of targeting a specific market or type of customer, they service a wide range of customers. A major characteristic of high street banks is that they are widespread and are located in any commercial sector of both, towns and cities.
  3. Business banking –Business banking servicesBusiness banking refers to a bank or financial institution that focuses solely on businesses and corporate clients, offering products such as business loans, asset management, and electronic fund transfers that are tailored to their specific needs.read more are those which are offered by High street banks. These services are provided in addition to what an ordinary account can offer. Hence, these are offered as additional services and for a certain fee.
  4. Investment banking – There financial institutions that offer investment banking servicesInvestment banking is a specialized banking stream that facilitates the business entities, government and other organizations in generating capital through debts and equity, reorganization, mergers and acquisition, etc.read more to a range of customers, from individuals, corporations to governments. These investment banking services are offered by these institutes wherein they invest in stocks of other companies as well as in bonds. Banks in United Kingdom services are provided on behalf of the high street banks, investment trustsAn investment trust is a publicly traded financial institution that operates as a closed-end fund (CEF) and invests in shares or financial assets on behalf of its investors or other organizations. The value of the amount of money invested in an investment trust is dependent by the demand and supply for the invested share or financial asset, as well as the underlying value of the assets owned.read more, and pension funds.

List of 10 Top Banks in the United Kingdom (UK)

  1. HSBC Holdings
  2. Lloyds Banking Group
  3. Royal Bank of Scotland Group
  4. Barclays
  5. Standard Chartered
  6. Santander UK
  7. Nationwide Building Society
  8. Schroders
  9. Close Brothers
  10. Coventry Building Society

The banks in the UK have gone through a major transition over the past decade. Currently, a major share of the banking sector is occupied by a few large banks. The top five largest banks are HSBC Holdings, Lloyds Banking Group, Royal Bank of Scotland Group, Barclays and Standard Chartered. This handful of banks have a monopoly on the supply of services to these enterprises. Let us now look at some of the history and current status of the topmost banks in the UK.

#1. HSBC Holdings:

In terms of total assets held, HSBC Holdings is deemed to be the seventh-largest bank in the world and the largest one in Europe. Although it was founded in Hong Kong in March 1865, it currently has its headquarters in the financial capital of United Kingdom, London and is the largest bank in United Kingdom. It has a wide range of services ranging from commercial banking, global banking, global private banking, retail banking, wealth management etc. The name of the bank, HSBC comes from the name that was in use when it was founded in Hong Kong, namely, Hong Kong and Shanghai Banking Corporation.

#2. Lloyds Banking Group:

The Lloyds Banking Group is considered to be a major banking institution in United Kingdom. It was founded in 2009 by acquiring HBOS. In fact, it was formed by the merging of HBOS and another bank, Lloyds TSB. Lloyds Banking Group also has a set of four subsidiaries, namely, Lloyds Bank, Halifax, Bank of Scotland and HBOS. It is considered the second largest bank in the United Kingdom and is headquartered in London.

#3. Royal Bank of Scotland Group:

The Royal Bank of Scotland or RBS Group is a retail banking company that provides various services to its customers ranging from corporate finance, business banking, insurance, and personal banking. It has its headquarters in Edinburgh, Scotland with offices in other parts of the world as well.

#4. Barclays:

A multinational investment bank and financial services company, Barclays is headquartered in London and operates in around fifty countries worldwide. Barclays offers various investment banking services like corporate banking, personal banking, insurance and wealth management.

#5. Standard Chartered:

Standard Chartered is a multinational banking and financial services company. Even though it is headquartered in London, It is a financial services company that does not offer any retail banking services in the United Kingdom. A major portion of its profit is from its operations in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East.

#6. Santander UK:

Santander UK is a financial services company that offers commercial banking, retail banking and global corporate banking services. It offers its services through various channels like ATMs, internet, digital, mobile, telephone etc.

#7. Nationwide Building Society:

The Nation Building Society is like a mutual fund institution which deemed to be the largest building society in the world with 15 million members. It provides its members with the current account, mortgage, savings and personal financesPersonal Financing is a way of saving, investing, and growing an individual's money. It can be for an individual or a family as a whole and requires some level of financial literacy such as tax laws, investment opportunities, etc.read more related services.

#8. Schroders:

Schroders is an asset management companyAsset Management Company is a company that takes the financial assets of a person, company or another asset management company (generally this will be high net worth individuals) and use the assets to invest in companies that use those as a operational investment, financial investment or any other investment in order to grow the investment.read more headquartered in London. It has operations in Europe, America, Asia, Africa and the Middle East. It offers various services like retail banking and wealth management, commercial banking and global banking.

#9. Close Brothers:

Close Brothers comes under the business bank category of banks. It is a merchant banking group that provides services like lending, deposit-taking, trading securities, and wealth management. They provide lending to individuals and small businesses and offer deposits to UK businesses and individuals.

#10. Coventry Building Society:

A building society based out of Coventry in England and is deemed as the second largest bank in the UK. It has Godiva Mortgages Limited, Coventry Building Society and Covered Bonds as its subsidiaries. It has various products and services to offer to its members, ranging from financial planning, mortgages, investment services, savings products, insurance including travel insurance.

Recommended Articles

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Источник: https://www.wallstreetmojo.com/top-banks-in-united-kingdom/

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  • Stocks and Shares ISA for tax efficient investing
  • Withdraw at any time, although investing is designed for the longer term
  • Responsible investments focusing on companies and industries who aim to positively affect our world

Already investing with Royal Bank Invest? Go straight to Digital banking log in

What's your investment personality?

We believe investment should be simple. So we’d like to introduce you to five ready-made, online investment funds that get you started from just £50. Find out five funds in more details. 

Our five investment personalities

Cautious and Careful

This is Personal Portfolio 1 Fund and it’s the lowest-risk fund we offer. Think of it as swimming in the shallow end with the peace of mind of being able to stand up.

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The fund is made up of around 80% Bonds, 18% Equity and 2% Cash.

Steady and Sound

This is Personal Portfolio 2 Fund and it's the low to medium risk fund. Think of it as venturing into the deep end of the pool but you know you can touch the side at any time.

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The fund is made up of around 60% Bonds, 38% Equity and 2% Cash.

Balanced and Bold

This is Personal Portfolio 3 Fund which is the medium risk fund. This is like the first dip in a lake. It may be colder and get your heart rate going but there should be some beautiful views.

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The fund is made up of around 44% Bonds, 54% Equity and 2% Cash. 

Optimistic and Assured

This is Personal Portfolio 4 Fund, which is the medium to high risk fund. Think of this as swimming out a little further to explore a reef. There are some beautiful things to see but it can be unpredictable.

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The fund is made up of around 24% Bonds, 74% Equity and 2% Cash. 

Daring and Determined

This is Personal Portfolio 5 Fund and it is the highest risk fund that we offer. This is like deep sea diving. You should see some amazing things but as always there is a level of danger to consider.

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The fund is made up of around 98% Equity and 2% Cash.

Royal Bank Invest past performance

Take a look how the five funds have performed in the past. As investments can go down as well as up, past performance isn't an indicator of future performance. However, this will show you how the funds have performed over time. 

Past fund performance

You'll have two choices on how to hold your investment. Whichever option you choose you'll still need to choose from one of the 5 ready made funds, you can't select individual stocks and shares to invest in.

Stock and Shares ISA

Investments held in a Stocks and Shares ISA means you don’t need to pay UK Income Tax or Capital Gains Tax on any investment growth. But there’s a limit on what you can invest in ISAs in any given tax year, for the 2021/2022 tax year it’s £20,000 (this is the total for both Cash ISAs and Stocks and Shares ISAs).

General Investment Account

There is no limit on the amount you can invest in the Royal Bank Invest General Investment Account. However, UK income tax and Capital Gains Tax are potentially payable.

You can hold investments in a Stocks and Shares ISA and a General Investment Account.

Tax reliefs referred to are those applied under current legislation, which may change. The availability and value of any tax relief will depend on your individual circumstances.

Royal Bank Invest fees, charges and costs

Platform Fee

Fund Ongoing charge

Transaction Costs

0.15% max p.a.

0.50% max p.a.

0.07% highest

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Find out what the different fees, charges and costs cover

 

Platform Fee

This covers the cost of administration and online access to your Royal Bank Invest account. The maximum you will pay is 0.15% of the value of your investment each year.

Fund Ongoing Charge

This covers the cost of managing your investment. The maximum you will pay is 0.5% of the value of your investment each year.

Transaction Costs

This is the cost of buying and selling shares and other investments that make up the fund. The fund manager estimates, based on actual past costs, that the highest costs that will be incurred for any of the available funds will be 0.07% of the value of the fund each year. These costs will be deducted by the fund manager from the fund’s assets.

These may change in the future. 

Here’s what you could pay to use Royal Bank Invest for a year when making monthly contributions…

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Platform Fee - £0.90 for the year

This covers the cost of administration and online access to your Royal Bank Invest account. The maximum you will pay is 0.15% of the value of your investment each year - down from 0.35% last year.

Fund Ongoing Charge - £3.00 for the year

This covers the cost of managing your investment. The maximum you will pay is 0.5% of the value of your investment each year - down from 0.6% last year.

Transaction Costs - £0.12 for the year

This is the cost of buying and selling shares and other investments that make up the fund. The fund manager estimates, based on actual past costs, that the highest costs that will be incurred for any of the available funds will be 0.07% of the value of the fund each year. These costs will be deducted by the fund manager from the fund’s assets. They remain unchanged from last year.

These may change in the future.

Based on a medium risk portfolio. For illustrative purposes only. The amount you pay will vary depending on the value of your investment. Data source: Royal Bank Invest. Data accurate as of 10 November 2021. Rates may change.

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Platform Fee - £1.80 for the year

This covers the cost of administration and online access to your Royal Bank Invest account. The maximum you will pay is 0.15% of the value of your investment each year - down from 0.35% last year.

Fund Ongoing Charge - £6.00 for the year

This covers the cost of managing your investment. The maximum you will pay is 0.5% of the value of your investment each year - down from 0.6% last year.

Transaction Costs - £0.24 for the year

This is the cost of buying and selling shares and other investments that make up the fund. The fund manager estimates, based on actual past costs, that the highest costs that will be incurred for any of the available funds will be 0.07% of the value of the fund each year. These costs will be deducted by the fund manager from the fund’s assets. They remain unchanged from last year.

These may change in the future.

Based on a medium risk portfolio. For illustrative purposes only. The amount you pay will vary depending on the value of your investment. Data source: Royal Bank Invest. Data accurate as of 10 November 2021. Rates may change.

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Platform Fee - £4.50 for the year

This covers the cost of administration and online access to your Royal Bank Invest account. The maximum you will pay is 0.15% of the value of your investment each year - down from 0.35% last year.

Fund Ongoing Charge - £15.00 for the year

This covers the cost of managing your investment. The maximum you will pay is 0.5% of the value of your investment each year - down from 0.6% last year.

Transaction Costs - £0.60 for the year

This is the cost of buying and selling shares and other investments that make up the fund. The fund manager estimates, based on actual past costs, that the highest costs that will be incurred for any of the available funds will be 0.07% of the value of the fund each year. These costs will be deducted by the fund manager from the fund’s assets. They remain unchnaged from last year.

These may change in the future.

Based on a medium risk portfolio. For illustrative purposes only. The amount you pay will vary depending on the value of your investment. Data source: Royal Bank Invest. Data accurate as of 10 November, 2021. Rates may change.

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Platform Fee - £9.00 for the year

This covers the cost of administration and online access to your Royal Bank Invest account. The maximum you will pay is 0.15% of the value of your investment each year - down from 0.35% last year.

Fund Ongoing Charge - £30.00 for the year

This covers the cost of managing your investment. The maximum you will pay is 0.5% of the value of your investment each year - down from 0.6% last year.

Transaction Costs - £1.20 for the year

This is the cost of buying and selling shares and other investments that make up the fund. The fund manager estimates, based on actual past costs, that the highest costs that will be incurred for any of the available funds will be 0.07% of the value of the fund each year. These costs will be deducted by the fund manager from the fund’s assets. They remain unchanged from last year. 

These may change in the future.

Based on a medium risk portfolio. For illustrative purposes only. The amount you pay will vary depending on the value of your investment. Data source: Royal Bank Invest. Data accurate as of 10 November 2021. Rates may change.

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Platform Fee - £18.00 for the year

This covers the cost of administration and online access to your Royal Bank Invest account. The maximum you will pay is 0.15% of the value of your investment each year - down from 0.35% last year.

Fund Ongoing Charge - £60.00 for the year

This covers the cost of managing your investment. The maximum you will pay is 0.5% of the value of your investment each year - down from 0.6% last year. 

Transaction Costs - £2.40 for the year

This is the cost of buying and selling shares and other investments that make up the fund. The fund manager estimates, based on actual past costs, that the highest costs that will be incurred for any of the available funds will be 0.07% of the value of the fund each year. These costs will be deducted by the fund manager from the fund’s assets. They remain unchanged from last year.

These may change in the future.

Based on a medium risk portfolio. For illustrative purposes only. The amount you pay will vary depending on the value of your investment. Data source: Royal Bank Invest. Data accurate as of 10 November 2021. Rates may change.

Already a Royal Bank Invest customer?

If you're already a Royal Bank Invest customer, you can track the progress of your investment as and when you want with your digital investment account.

Login to Royal Bank Invest

Yes.
You can choose to transfer any existing ISAs you have to Royal Bank Invest.

If you need advice deciding whether you should transfer, we're sorry but we can't help - our automated advice service only offers advice on investing your spare income and savings.

Coutts & Co do the investment management.

Made up of more than 60 investment specialists, the team at Coutts includes economists and investment analysts with years of experience managing money.

The five funds are provided by RBS Asset Management (Dublin) Limited.

Before investing you should consider:

Setting aside enough money in accessible savings to cover any emergencies - an amount of around 4 times your essential monthly expenditure is typically about right.

If your existing insurance and pension arrangements are sufficient for your needs.

Paying off any high interest debts that your money would be better used to repay.

You can make withdrawals at any time but generally the longer you invest for the more chance there is for growth on you investment. So if you invest you should be prepared to do so for 5 years or more. 

The value of investments can go down as well as up. This means you could get back less than your original investment.  New to investing? Learn more about the difference between saving and investing before you start to invest. 

The assets held within each of the Personal Portfolio Funds are held separately from the bank by an independent company called a depositary, which is authorised by the Central Bank of Ireland. So your investments would be safe even if Royal Bank of Scotland failed. Your investments through Royal Bank Invest may also be covered by the Financial Services Compensation Scheme in some scenarios.

For more details click here

If you're already investing with us you can log in to your Royal Bank Invest account for day to day transactions, or if you're concerned about the current situation and have questions about managing your investment during this time, please see our latest guidance and common questions. 

If you'd prefer to speak to us, you can call the Help and Support team on 0345 304 1005 (for Relay UK prefix the number with 18001). Our lines are open Monday to Friday, from 9.30am to 5pm. We're closed Bank Holidays. Calls may be recorded.

Yes, the Personal Portfolio Funds are! The shares and funds we select on your behalf are responsible investments. Responsible investing focuses on companies and industries who aim to positively affect our world in three key areas: environmental, social, and governance (ESG). Find out more.

Cashback offer terms and conditions (PDF, 1.5MB)

 

Q. How long was this offer available?

A. The offer started on 23 August and ended at the latest on September 30 2021.

The following questions give you some details of what was in the Cashback offer:

Q. Am I eligible for the offer?

A. This offer was open to customers, who do not currently invest with Royal Bank Invest. To qualify for this offer you must:

  • Set up an account with Royal Bank Invest by 30 September 2021
  • Make an initial lump sum investment of at least £100 between 23 August 2021 and 30 September 2021 inclusive
  • Start making regular monthly contributions of at least £50 into your account by 31 October 2021 and continue making them until at least 1 January 2022

Standard eligibility criteria apply: you must have online banking, be aged 18-84, have a current account with Royal Bank and be a UK resident for tax purposes. Junior ISA not eligible for offer.

Q. When will I receive my £50 cashback?

A. Provided you have met the eligibility criteria, the cash will be paid no later than 31 January 2022.

Q. How do I start making regular monthly contributions?

A. When setting up your investment for the first time, you will be asked ‘How much do you want to Invest’ and you’ll have the option of entering a single investment amount, monthly investment amount, or both. If you have already set-up your investment and would like to add a regular monthly contribution, you can do so by selecting your Personal Portfolio Fund and selecting ‘set up monthly contributions’. The minimum monthly amount that you can invest is £50.

Q. If I open multiple funds would I get multiple cashback?

A. The maximum cashback that we will pay to you is £50 regardless of the number of Royal Bank Invest eligible accounts you hold.

Q. If I have a joint current account will both myself and the joint account holder receive £50?

A. Provided you both have separate Invest accounts and eligibility criteria is met you will both receive cashback.

Log in and explore invest

Log in to the Royal Bank investment portal, you'll need your Online Banking details. You can see a forecast of how an investment could perform.

Complete your investment

Firstly, let us know if you want to choose your own investment or get automated advice. With automated advice there is a one-off fee of £10 for our advice if you invest. There will be no fee if we think investing isn’t right for you or if you don’t invest.

Sit back and relax

Coutts investment managers will invest your funds. Log back in at anytime to check your investment and top up.

Источник: https://www.rbs.co.uk/investments/royal-bank-invest.html

UK Women in Finance Charter

Charter Targets Progress

We aim to increase UK female representation in senior roles to be at least 30% by end of January 2023. We define senior management as EMEA Operating Committee members and two layers of direct/co-direct reports below them, including UK officers only. As of September 2021, our figure stood at 31.73%.

2021 Progress Highlights

  • Female membership on our main Morgan Stanley International Board has increased from 38% (2020) to 42.9% (2021).
  • Female representation on our EMEA Operating Committee increased from 17.6% (2018) to 42.1% (2021).
  • Female representation across our overall workforce increased from 35% (2018) to 38.6% (2021).
  • Reduced our UK Gender Pay Gap median for the Morgan Stanley UK Group from 34.3 % (2018) to 30.4% (2020).
  • Included in the Times UK Top 50 Employers for Women 2021, in association with Business in the Community.
  • Joined the 30% Club, which aims to raise gender representation at senior management levels.
  • Joined the 25x25 initiative, which aims to increase the number of women CEOs in UK business, as a lead ambassador.
  • Seventh year of our Global Return to Work programme, giving women the opportunity to re-enter the workforce after a career break.
  • Launched the Morgan Stanley Experience Professionals Program in London, which is designed to further attract diverse professionals from outside of the finance industry.
  • Our percentage of women on the EMEA Summer Analyst programme was 50%.
  • Sponsorship of the four-year ‘Accelerating Change Together’ programme (ACT), instituted by Women in Banking and Finance (WIBF). This research will look to further identify why women continue to be under-represented at senior levels.

EMEA Diversity and Inclusion Governance and Strategy

Our EMEA Diversity Action Council provides thought leadership and acts as a catalyst to drive forward the overall EMEA diversity strategy in partnership with Human Resources, Diversity and Inclusion and the Talent teams. It meets monthly and is co-chaired by Simon Smith, Managing Director, EMEA Head of the Investment Banking Division and Noreen Whyte, CEO of Morgan Stanley Bank International and Co-Head of the Loan Solutions Group in Global Capital Markets.

Additionally, each Managing Director member is held accountable by their Division/Region Head for ensuring that rigor and creative thinking are incorporated into their respective divisional diversity practices and for delivering on their annual diversity and inclusion plan.

Regular meetings are held with Division/Region Heads, their Chief Operating Officers and Diversity Action Council members to review divisional progress on metrics, the diverse talent pipeline and specific diversity initiatives. Accountability is underscored by monthly strategic dialogue with the EMEA Operating Committee.

Источник: https://www.morganstanley.com/about-us/diversity/uk-women-in-finance-charter

Coauthors Val Srinivas, Jill Gregorie, Richa Wadhwani, Samia Hazuria, Abhinav Chauhan, Rob Bradley and contributing analyst Shivalik Srivastav wish to thank the following Deloitte client services professionals for their insights and contributions:

Zach Aron, principal, Deloitte Consulting LLP

Scott Baret, partner, Deloitte & Touche LLP

Robert Contri, principal, Global Financial Services Industry leader, Deloitte Services LP

Peter Firth, managing director, Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu

Rob Galaski, vice chair & managing partner, Financial Services, Deloitte Canada

Sylvia Gentzsch, senior manager, Deloitte GmbH

Edna Kamara, managing director, Deloitte Services LP

Howard Kaplan, partner, Deloitte & Touche LLP

Jean-Francois Lagasse, managing partner & Financial Services industry leader, Deloitte Switzerland

Taryn Mason, senior consultant, Deloitte Canada

David Myers, partner, Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu

Raman Rai, partner, Deloitte Canada

Michael Tang, partner and head, global digital transformation for Financial Services, Deloitte Canada

Neil Tomlinson, partner, Deloitte MCS Limited

Aaron Turenshine, partner, Deloitte Tax LLP

Economics

Daniel Bachman, US economic forecaster, Deloitte Services LP

Talent

Susan Hogan, senior manager, Deloitte Services LP

Margaret Painter, principal, Deloitte Consulting LLP Customer and marketing

Ryan Alderman, principal, Deloitte Consulting LLP

Gina Primeaux, principal, Deloitte & Touche LLP

Jonathan Valenti, principal, Deloitte Consulting LLP

Technology

Gys Hyman, principal, Deloitte Consulting LLP

David Jarvis, senior manager, Deloitte Services LP

Diana Kearns-Manolatos, senior manager, Deloitte Services LP

Jeff Loucks, managing director, Deloitte Services LP

David Schatsky, managing director, Deloitte LLP

Chris Thomas, principal, Deloitte Consulting LLP

Finance

Bradley Niedzielski, partner, Deloitte & Touche LLP

Risk and Compliance

Alex Brady, principal, Deloitte & Touche LLP

Thomas Nicolosi, principal, Deloitte & Touche LLP

Bob Walley, principal, Deloitte & Touche LLP

Cyber Risk and Financial Crime

Julie Bernard, principal, Deloitte & Touche LLP

Mark Nicholson, principal, Deloitte & Touche LLP

Michael Shepard, principal, Deloitte DTBA

Sir Rob Wainwright, partner, Deloitte Risk Advisory BV

Fintechs and Bigtechs

Irena Gecas-McCarthy, principal, Deloitte & Touche LLP

Monica Lalani, principal, Deloitte & Touche LLP

Richard Rosenthal, principal, Deloitte & Touche LLP

M&A

Maximiliano Bercum, principal, Deloitte Consulting LLP

Liz Fennessey, principal, Deloitte Consulting LLP

Corey Goldblum, principal, Deloitte DTBA

Matt Hutton, partner, Deloitte & Touche LLP

Jason Langan, partner, Deloitte & Touche LLP

Nadia Orawski, principal, Deloitte Consulting LLP Sustainable Finance

Ricardo Martinez, principal, Deloitte & Touche LLP

Kristen Sullivan, partner, Deloitte & Touche LLP

Hans-Juergen Walter, partner, Deloitte Consulting GmbH

Digital Assets

Linda Pawczuk, principal, Deloitte Consulting LLP

Richard Walker, principal, Deloitte Consulting LLP

Cover image by: Willy Sions

Источник: https://www2.deloitte.com/us/en/insights/industry/financial-services/financial-services-industry-outlooks/banking-industry-outlook.html

You can watch a thematic video

5 Best Index Funds to Own For LIFE - UK - 2021

Top 5 new stars of investment banking in India

Move over Kothari, Kampani and Kotak. A young bunch of dealmakers is emulating their illustrious predecessors. They don’t yet head an investment banking unit, but their star is on the rise. They are below 40 years of age and have closed a $100 millionplus deal in the past 12 months. ET profile five top guns

1) Amit Mimani, 37

Director, Mergers and Acquisitions, Standard Chartered Bank

Education: CA, MBA (IIM-Calcutta)

Big Deal: Diageo’s acquisition of United Spirits

I-banking wisdom: Learn from each of your deals, whether they close or fail. Dealmaking is a pressure cooker environment— you need to learn to stay calm and make decisions under pressure

Winning in losing
Amit Mimani’s ability to close big transactions in the past 18 months belies the broader slowdown in deal-making across India Inc. In this period, he steered the Jaypee-UltraTech deal, helped Diageo buy United Spirits, and is now aiding the strategic sale of Neotel, Tata Comm’s South African unit.

Mimani has taken strides as an investment banker in the past decade, from cutting his teeth with the TCS-HDFC deal for Intelenet in 2004 to guiding Bhartí’s acquisition of Zain in Africa in 2010. Yet, for this blue-blooded dealmaker, a transaction he didn’t close—the aborted Bharti-MTN deal in 2008—means the most.

“I learnt the most from this marathon 12 to 18 month effort,” says Mimani. “I learnt to how to remain calm, focused and efficient in high-pressure situations. Second, I learnt to deal with smart and ambitious people with diverse backgrounds.” That intimate knowledge of telecom and Africa came in handy: the $10.7 billion Zain acquisition was closed in around 45 days. “These are once-in-a-lifetime opportunities,” says the Kolkata-born Mimani.

His i-banking career started after IIM with Dr Reddy’s inhouse M&A team. Two years later, in 2005, he joined StanChart, when it was starting its i-banking unit. Today he leads a 14-person M&A team. Despite StanChart having a strong deal flow in 2013, while the rest saw a lull, he refuses to take credit. “It is all about the bank’s ability to make strategic deals with large corporates,” he says.

It’s getting tougher. Companies are sitting on cash, bargaining harder and taking longer to make up their minds. Five years ago, deals would close in six months. Today, they can go up to 18 months.

The challenge for i-bankers is to keep the deals flowing, since their pay depends on closures. “Since it’s a success-based business, fees and earnings can be somewhat lumpy,” he says. Despite that uncertainty, he loves the business.

“There is something new to learn from each deal. You come across different industries, different geographies and different cultures.”

Such diversity is the “biggest kick” in this space. “You have to enjoy deal-making…it is not something you can manage in the long term.” For Mimani, dealmaking is a moving target. And brutally unforgiving: while 50 things need to go right, one slip up can bury a deal.




2) Niraj Karia, 33


Senior VP, Kotak Mahindra Capital

Education: Chartered Accountant

Big Deal: $200 mn share swap deal between Mahindra Group and Spanish auto component maker CIE Group

I-banking wisdom: In investment banking, 50% work is imagination and 50% is perspiration. In challenging times, you need more of imagination and innovation.

Auditor to advisor

He looks sanguine, having completed the $200 million share swap deal between the Top 50 investment banks uk Group and Spanish auto component maker CIE Group in August. For Niraj Karia, the deal highlights his ability to deliver on mega cross-border deals.

The 33-year-old auto and industrials head for Kotak Investment Bank has followed his calling into investment banking. As a young CA working with PwC in 2002, analysing businesses while auditing client accounts intrigued him. “I knew I could not be an auditor all my life,” he says. “Going beyond numbers and analysing business attracted me. I took the plunge in 2004 and joined Kotak Investment Bank,” says Karia, who had other two offers in hand at that time.

From his very first transaction, where he managed Standard & Poor’s acquisition of credit ratings agency Crisil, Karia started living his dream of helping buying and selling companies. “After managing seven consecutive tender offers and buybacks, I walked up to my boss and told him that I want to work on my skills as a ‘banker’, as a ‘generalist’, and not get bucketed,” he says. “The firm then tested me across sectors like TMT, industrials, auto & consumer.”

Since then, Karia has advised companies on more than two dozen transactions such as Standard Chartered PE’s stake sale in Endurance Technologies to Actis. “Karia is an innovative problem solver and has the ability to deliver on the goals set by us,” says Anurang Jain, managing director of Endurance. “The transaction between two private equity funds was a complex one, but he delivered it efficiently.”

Karia also advised the promoters of Anchor Electricals on the sale of their business to Japan’s Panasonic. The latter is especially memorable since top 50 investment banks uk converted a mandate for a possible public listing by a conservative Anchor Electricals into an outright sale to a cautious Japanese giant.

He’s coming to a decade in Kotak, but it doesn’t bother him. “When you start early and look forward to a longer working life, you think about your take-home in the retirement year and not the early pay checks. The firm has always provided me room and a platform to grow, to add value to myself, and that is what has kept me going.” Such stickiness is visible in his personal life too. He’s lived in Worli, South Mumbai, for 30 years, and has even bought a flat in the same complex as his parents.

But his work is changing, with deals dwindling and cycles elongating. It’s back to basics. “Investment banking is 50% imagination and 50% perspiration,” he says. “In challenging times, you need more of imagination and innovation.”

3) Madhur Deora, 35

Managing Director, Corporate and Investment Banking, Citigroup Global Markets India

Education: BSc in Finance and Management from Wharton

Big Deal: Just Dial IPO

I-banking wisdom: Back your gut, even when the majority think your ideas could fail. Some deals involve forsaking short-term gains for long-term profits.

On the road less travelled

Madhur Deora, who gave up the opportunity to inherit his old-world family business, helped the distinctly new-age Just Dial, a provider of local search services, with its IPO. Going against the grain isn’t unusual for the 35-year-old. At 16, he shocked his family by opting to head to the United States for his last two years of high school at the Philips Exeter Academy, a 232-year-old school in New Hampshire.

It transported him from a dusty Bhilai, Chhattisgarh, to a place that saw three months of snow. He adapted well, acing his academics and seeing the likes of then-US president Bill Clinton and billionaire Steve Forbes give speeches at his school.

Top grades got him to Wharton, after which he joined Salmon Smith Barney in 1999 in its financial entrepreneurship group. It was later acquired by Travelers Group in 1998 and the latter was merged with Citicorp to form Citibank. Two years and his own marriage later, he moved to its London offices, which was meant to be a one-year stint but eventually turned into five.

On a holiday to India in late-2005, Citibank’s India head Pramit Javeri approached him to join its India i-banking unit. It was a dozen-strong then; today, it has 30 people. The booming economy was generating a flood of deals. He became thoroughly involved, including assisting HDFC raise a real estate fund, Hutchison and Essar’s $11 billion deal and Sterlite’s $2 billion ADR.

Deora’s first deal, in 2001, was a $107 million IPO of a California diagnostic firm called Unilab. From there, he moved on to progressively bigger deals. From being a generalist, when he returned to India, he graduated to something of a technology and telecom specialist.

Lately, he’s also added PE funds to find viable deals and squeeze out profitable exits in a tough market.

It is, however, the Just Dial IPO that he is most proud of. “Everyone said a PE of 40 can’t be achieved in India. We proved them wrong and this deal redefined the Indian market,” he says. “We had to prove that the growth is sustainable and there is a high likelihood that this could become a $5 billion company down the road. In the larger scheme of things, the entry price doesn’t really matter very much.” Adds Just Dial founder VVS Mani: “Madhur brought our story in front of investors, considering the fact that there are no major comparisons available for our company.”



4) Anshuman Thakur, 36

Executive director of Morgan Stanley in India

Education: IIM-Ahmedabad

Big Deal: Worked on deals worth more than $20 billion

I-banking wisdom: Differentiate yourself with content, ideas, relationships and out-ofthe-box thinking. In the Indian context, patience and perseverance are very important as well.

Dabhol to DoT

He has pedigree: an IIM-A education, 13 years of experience and deep understanding of the Indian market. And he does not have are the airs of a typical investment banker. Anshuman Thakur, executive director of global investment bank Morgan Stanley in India, is the go-to man for Indian corporates looking at acquisitions or global partnerships. Thakur, 36, has worked on deals worth more than $20 billion.

His first deal, a rough start as a new recruit at accounting firm Arthur Anderson in 2000, was to privatise the Haryana State Electrification Board. It didn’t take off. It did help him land at financial advisory firm NM Rothschild four years later. His first big deal was the successful execution of the $2 billion Dabhol Power Project revival plan—a complex transaction, involving about half a dozen bankers and stakeholders. Yet, Thakur does not see that as his marquee deal.

For him, the highlight was when he, as the lead banker for telecom at Rothschild, got mandated by the Department of Telecom to conduct 3G auctions for telecom companies. “That was the time when the who’s who of telecom would spend time with me and our team at Rothschild came to be regarded for our work in the auctions,” says Thakur.

Six years at Rothschild helped Thakur make inroads into big corporate groups across sbi card payment through hdfc netbanking, telecom, media and IT. At the same time, the invetsment bank worked on transactions like GMR’s acquisition of Intergen and the sale of Aircel’s tower assets to GTL, one of the largest allcash transactions ever.

The Rothschild stint also taught Thakur to work effortlessly and not lose sleep over a deal, a trait he learned from his boss Sanjay Bhandarkar. With his current boss Ayesha De Sequiera, he has learnt to deliver on the needs of global clients through effortless execution.

“He is very diligent and has sound technical knowledge,” says Sanjay Bhandarkar, MD and India head for NM Rothschild. “He likes working in uncharted territory like the 3G auctions we conducted. He played a very important role in developing the entire structure.”

Thakur joined Morgan Stanley in 2011 to work on a larger canvas. He successfully executed deals like Oil India-ONGC Videsh’s joint bid for assets in Mozambique, the Tech Mahindra-Satyam merger, Vedanta’s restructuring, and the stake sale by Reliance ADAG in its insurance ventures to Nippon Life.

5) Ankur Verma, 37

Head of TMT and Oil & Gas, DSP Merrill

Education: IIM-Calcutta Big Deal: OVL’s $5.2 b acquisition of Videocon Mozambique’s gas field

I-banking wisdom: I-banking isn’t a job for the faint-hearted; expect to work 14 hours or more during deal closure.

The rainmaker

In the past 10 months, Ankur Verma has steered deals worth around $5.2 billion for state-owned ONGC Videsh (OVL). First, along with Oil India, OVL acquired Videocon’s 10% stake in a Mozambique Oil Field and followed it up this August with another 10% on its own. The two deals capped off his meteoric rise, but it took seemingly endless flights and dozens of meetings with Videocon, OVL and Oil India to swing the deals.

Verma—a mechanical engineer and IIM-Calcutta alum—is a hot cake in i-banking. He joined Bank of America Merrill Lynch as an equity analyst nine years ago and switched to i-banking only in 2005. He earned his spurs in technology, media and telecom: notably Idea Cellular mandates (its IPO, the Spice buy and a tower deal) and HCL’s purchase of Axon.

Now, he’s a sought after deal maker in BAML and outside. “Ankur has great energy and dedication,” says Vishal Gupta, managing director of global venture capital firm Bessemer Ventures, who has known him for about a decade. “He is detail-oriented and quick with practical advice.” His peers say he puts tough demands on his team, leading with 14-16 hour days nearing deal closure.

Verma took the long way to ibanking in spite of a summer internship with what was then DSP Merill Lynch. His first job was as a junior coder at TCS. After IIM, he joined Computer Sciences Corporation as a project manager. Later, he joined Infosys and played a key role in formulating its threeyear business plan, which became the cornerstone of the company’s growth in the previous decade. “It was not an easy decision to leave Infosys…but I wanted to look beyond corporate strategy,” he says.

Today, he deals with another kind of challenge. “This is a challenging time to be in this profession,” he says. “We have seen rivals like Nomura and UBS downsize or exit. In this market, we focus on quality, rather than quantity of deals,” he says.
(Catch all the Business News, Breaking NewsEvents and Latest NewsUpdates on The Economic Times.)

Download The Economic Times News App to get Daily Market Updates & Live Business News.

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Источник: https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/industry/banking/finance/banking/top-5-new-stars-of-investment-banking-in-india/articleshow/25198316.cms

Overview

The banking sector in the United Kingdom is regarded as the largest in Europe and it is considered to be the fourth largest in the world. Banking in the UK is highly developed, with new entrants in the sector being driven by cutting-edge technology and innovation. It also considered being the largest financial center in the world for cross-border lending.

With a staggering amount of 40 billion payments made in 2017 alone, the UK’s banking sector has the deep penetration of banking across the country. Banks in the United Kingdom can be demonstrated by the fact that nearly the entire population of the UK has a debit card and about two-thirds of the population is said to have a credit card.

Banks in the United Kingdom

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Structure of Banks in the United Kingdom

There are different categories of banks in the UK. Each category of banks caters to varying needs, ranging from personal to business needs. Listed below are the four major categories of banks in the UK.

  1. Central bank – In the UK, the central bank is the Bank of England or BoE. The Bank of England is the central bank of the UK and also happens to the world’s eighth oldest bank. The Bank of England is tasked with setting up and maintaining the monetary policyMonetary policy refers to the steps taken by a country’s central bank to control the money supply for economic stability. For example, policymakers manipulate money circulation for increasing employment, GDP, price stability by using tools such as interest rates, reserves, bonds, etc.read more and financial stability of the country.
  2. High Street Banks – High street banks are like retail banks that have multiple branch locations. Given that these banks provide retail services, they mostly serve the general public. This means that instead of targeting a specific market or type of customer, they service a wide range of customers. A major characteristic of high street banks is that they are widespread and are located in any commercial sector of both, towns and cities.
  3. Business banking –Business banking servicesBusiness banking refers to a bank or financial institution that focuses solely on businesses and corporate clients, offering products such as business loans, asset management, and electronic fund transfers that are tailored to geico home insurance usa specific needs.read more are those which are offered by High street banks. These services are provided in addition to what an ordinary account can offer. Hence, these are offered as additional services and for a certain fee.
  4. Investment banking – There financial institutions that offer investment banking servicesInvestment banking is a specialized banking stream that facilitates the business entities, government and other organizations in generating capital through debts and equity, reorganization, mergers and acquisition, etc.read more to a range of customers, from individuals, corporations to governments. These investment banking services are offered by these institutes wherein they invest in stocks of other companies as well as in bonds. Banks in United Kingdom services are provided on behalf of the high street banks, investment trustsAn investment trust is a publicly traded financial institution that operates as a closed-end fund (CEF) and invests in shares or financial assets on behalf of its investors or other organizations. The value of the amount of money invested in an investment trust is dependent by the demand and supply for the invested share or financial asset, as well as the underlying value of the assets owned.read more, and pension funds.

List of 10 Top Directions to citizens business bank arena in the United Kingdom (UK)

  1. HSBC Holdings
  2. Lloyds Banking Group
  3. Royal Bank of Scotland Group
  4. Barclays
  5. Standard Chartered
  6. Santander UK
  7. Nationwide Building Society
  8. Schroders
  9. Close Brothers
  10. Coventry Building Society

The banks in the UK have gone through a major transition over the past decade. Currently, a major share of the banking sector is occupied by a few large banks. The top five largest banks are HSBC Holdings, Lloyds Banking Group, Royal Bank of Scotland Group, Barclays and Standard Chartered. This handful of banks have a monopoly on the supply of services to these enterprises. Let us now look at some of the history and current status of the topmost banks in the UK.

#1. HSBC Holdings:

In terms of total assets held, HSBC Holdings is deemed to be the seventh-largest bank in the world and the largest one in Europe. Although it was founded in Hong Kong in March 1865, it currently has its headquarters in the financial capital of United Kingdom, London and is the largest bank in United Kingdom. It has a wide range of services ranging from commercial banking, global banking, global private banking, retail banking, wealth management etc. The name of the bank, HSBC comes from the name that was in use when it was founded in Hong Kong, namely, Hong Kong and Shanghai Banking Corporation.

#2. Lloyds Banking Group:

The Lloyds Banking Group is considered to be a major banking institution in United Kingdom. It was founded in 2009 by acquiring HBOS. In fact, it was formed by the merging of HBOS and another bank, Lloyds TSB. Lloyds Banking Group also has a set of four subsidiaries, namely, Lloyds Bank, Halifax, Bank of Scotland and HBOS. It is considered the second largest bank in the United Kingdom and is headquartered in London.

#3. Royal Bank of Scotland Group:

The Royal Bank of Scotland or RBS Group is a retail banking company that provides various services to its customers ranging from corporate finance, business banking, insurance, and personal banking. It has its headquarters in Edinburgh, Scotland with offices in other parts of the world as well.

#4. Barclays:

A multinational investment bank and financial services company, Barclays is headquartered in London and operates in around fifty countries worldwide. Barclays offers various investment banking services like corporate banking, personal banking, insurance and wealth management.

#5. Standard Chartered:

Standard Chartered is a multinational banking and financial services company. Even though it is headquartered in London, It is a financial top 50 investment banks uk company that does not offer any retail banking services in the United Kingdom. A major portion of its profit is from its operations in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East.

#6. Santander UK:

Santander UK is a financial services company that offers commercial banking, retail banking and global corporate banking services. It offers its services through various channels like ATMs, internet, digital, mobile, telephone etc.

#7. Nationwide Building Society:

The Nation Building Society is like a mutual fund institution which deemed to be the largest building society in the world with 15 million members. It provides its members with the current account, mortgage, savings and personal financesPersonal Financing is a way of saving, investing, and growing an individual's money. It can be for an individual or a family as a whole and requires some level of financial literacy such as tax laws, investment opportunities, etc.read more related services.

#8. Schroders:

Schroders is an asset management companyAsset Management Company is a company that takes the financial assets of a person, company or another asset management company (generally this will be high net worth individuals) and use the assets to invest in companies that use those as a operational investment, financial investment or any other investment in order to grow the investment.read more headquartered in London. It has operations in Europe, America, Asia, Africa and the Middle East. It offers various services like retail banking and wealth management, commercial banking and global banking.

#9. Close Brothers:

Close Brothers comes under the business bank category of banks. It is a merchant banking group that provides services like lending, deposit-taking, trading securities, and wealth management. They provide lending to individuals and small businesses and offer deposits to UK businesses and individuals.

#10. Coventry Building Society:

A building society based out of Coventry in England and is deemed as the second largest bank in the UK. It has Godiva Mortgages Limited, Coventry Building Society and Covered Bonds as its subsidiaries. It has various products and services to offer to its members, ranging from financial planning, mortgages, investment services, savings products, insurance including travel insurance.

Recommended Articles

We hope you liked this guide to top banks in the Top 50 investment banks uk Kingdom. If you are looking forward to making a career in Banking, then you can check out some of the awesome resources –

Источник: https://www.wallstreetmojo.com/top-banks-in-united-kingdom/

Coauthors Val Srinivas, Jill Gregorie, Richa Wadhwani, Samia Hazuria, Abhinav Chauhan, Rob Bradley and contributing analyst Shivalik Srivastav wish to thank the following Deloitte client services professionals for their insights and contributions:

Zach Aron, principal, Deloitte Consulting LLP

Scott Baret, partner, Deloitte & Touche LLP

Robert Contri, principal, Global Financial Services Industry leader, Deloitte Services LP

Peter Firth, managing director, Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu

Rob Galaski, vice chair & managing partner, Financial Services, Deloitte Canada

Sylvia Gentzsch, senior manager, Deloitte GmbH

Edna Kamara, managing director, Deloitte Services LP

Howard Kaplan, partner, Deloitte & Touche LLP

Jean-Francois Lagasse, managing partner & Financial Services industry leader, Deloitte Switzerland

Taryn Mason, senior consultant, Deloitte Canada

David Myers, partner, Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu

Raman Rai, partner, Deloitte Canada

Michael Tang, partner and head, global digital transformation for Financial Services, Deloitte Canada

Neil Tomlinson, partner, Deloitte MCS Limited

Aaron Turenshine, partner, Deloitte Tax LLP

Economics

Daniel Bachman, US economic forecaster, Deloitte Services LP

Talent

Susan Hogan, senior manager, Deloitte Services LP

Margaret Painter, principal, Deloitte Consulting LLP Customer and marketing

Ryan Alderman, principal, Deloitte Consulting LLP

Gina Primeaux, principal, Deloitte & Touche LLP

Jonathan Valenti, principal, Deloitte Consulting LLP

Technology

Gys Hyman, principal, Deloitte Consulting LLP

David Jarvis, senior manager, Deloitte Services LP

Diana Kearns-Manolatos, senior manager, Deloitte Services LP

Jeff Loucks, managing director, Deloitte Services LP

David Schatsky, managing director, Deloitte LLP

Chris Thomas, principal, Deloitte Consulting LLP

Finance

Bradley Niedzielski, partner, Deloitte & Touche LLP

Risk and Compliance

Alex Brady, principal, Deloitte & Touche LLP

Thomas Nicolosi, principal, Deloitte & Touche LLP

Bob Walley, principal, Deloitte & Touche LLP

Cyber Risk and Financial Crime

Julie Bernard, principal, Deloitte & Touche LLP

Mark Nicholson, principal, Deloitte & Touche LLP

Michael Shepard, principal, Deloitte DTBA

Sir Rob Top 50 investment banks uk, partner, Deloitte Risk Advisory BV

Fintechs and Bigtechs

Irena Gecas-McCarthy, principal, Deloitte & Touche LLP

Monica Lalani, principal, Deloitte & Touche LLP

Richard Rosenthal, principal, Deloitte & Touche LLP

M&A

Maximiliano Bercum, principal, Deloitte Consulting LLP

Liz Fennessey, principal, Deloitte Consulting LLP

Corey Goldblum, principal, Deloitte DTBA

Matt Hutton, partner, Deloitte & Touche LLP

Jason Langan, partner, Deloitte & Touche LLP

Nadia Orawski, principal, Deloitte Consulting LLP Sustainable Finance

Ricardo Martinez, principal, Deloitte & Touche LLP

Kristen Sullivan, partner, Deloitte & Touche LLP

Hans-Juergen Walter, partner, Deloitte Consulting GmbH

Digital Assets

Linda Pawczuk, principal, Deloitte Consulting LLP

Richard Walker, principal, Deloitte Consulting LLP

Cover image by: Willy Sions

Источник: https://www2.deloitte.com/us/en/insights/industry/financial-services/financial-services-industry-outlooks/banking-industry-outlook.html

Royal Bank Investmakes investing simple

Investments

The value of investments can go down as well as up. Your capital is at risk. Eligibility criteria, fees and charges apply.

With so many investment options, it can be difficult to start investing. That’s why we’ve created Royal Bank Invest where our Coutts experts manage the investments for you.

 

You only need to choose how much you want to put in and your preferred level of risk. Or you can get help with our online automated advice. With automated advice there is a one-off fee of £10 for our advice if you invest. There will be no fee if we think investing isn’t right for you or if you don’t invest.

  • 5 ready made funds, from cautious & careful to daring & determined 
  • Start investing from £50
  • Stocks and Shares ISA for tax efficient investing
  • Withdraw at any time, although investing is designed for the longer term
  • Responsible investments focusing on companies and industries who aim to positively affect our world

Already investing with Royal Bank Invest? Go straight to Digital banking log in

What's your investment personality?

We believe investment should be simple. So we’d like to introduce you to five ready-made, online investment funds that get you started from just £50. Find out five funds in more details. 

Our five investment personalities

Cautious and Careful

This is Personal Portfolio 1 Fund and it’s the lowest-risk fund we offer. Think of it as swimming in the shallow end with the peace of mind of being able to stand up.

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The fund is made up of around 80% Bonds, 18% Equity and 2% Cash.

Steady and Sound

This is Personal Portfolio 2 Fund and it's the low to medium risk fund. Think of it as venturing into the deep end of the pool but you know you can touch the side at any time.

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The fund is made up of around 60% Bonds, 38% Equity and 2% Cash.

Balanced and Bold

This is Personal Portfolio 3 Fund which is the medium risk fund. This is like the first dip in a lake. It may be colder and get your heart rate going but there should be some beautiful views.

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The fund is made up of around 44% Bonds, 54% Equity and 2% Cash. 

Optimistic and Assured

This is Top 50 investment banks uk Portfolio 4 Fund, which is the medium to high risk fund. Think of this as swimming out a little further to explore a reef. There are some beautiful things to see but it can be unpredictable.

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The fund is made up of around 24% Bonds, 74% Equity and 2% Cash. 

Daring and Determined

This is Personal Portfolio 5 Fund and it is the highest risk fund that we offer. This is like deep sea diving. You should see some amazing things but as always there is a level of danger to consider.

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The fund is made up of around 98% Equity and 2% Cash.

Royal Bank Invest past performance

Take a look how the five funds have performed in the past. As investments can go down as well as up, past performance isn't an indicator of future performance. However, this will show you how the funds have performed over time. 

Past fund performance

You'll have two choices on how to hold your investment. Whichever option you choose you'll still need to choose from one of the 5 ready made funds, you can't select individual stocks and shares to invest in.

Stock and Shares ISA

Investments held in a Stocks and Shares ISA means you don’t need to pay UK Income Tax or Capital Gains Tax on any investment growth. But there’s a limit on what you can invest in ISAs in top 50 investment banks uk given tax year, for the 2021/2022 tax year it’s £20,000 (this is the total for both Cash ISAs and Stocks and Shares ISAs).

General Investment Account

There is no limit on the amount you can invest in the Royal Bank Invest General Investment Account. However, UK income tax and Capital Gains Tax are potentially payable.

You can hold investments in a Stocks and Shares ISA and a General Investment Account.

Tax reliefs referred to are those applied under current legislation, which may change. The availability and value of any tax relief will depend on your individual circumstances.

Royal Bank Invest fees, charges and costs

Platform Fee

Fund Ongoing charge

Transaction Costs

0.15% max p.a.

0.50% max p.a.

0.07% highest

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Find out what the different fees, charges and costs cover

 

Platform Fee

This covers the cost of administration and online access to your Royal Bank Invest account. The maximum you will pay is 0.15% of the value of your investment each year.

Fund Ongoing Charge

This covers the cost of managing your investment. The maximum you will pay is 0.5% of the value of your investment each year.

Transaction Costs

This is the cost of buying and selling shares and other investments that make up the fund. The fund manager estimates, based on actual past costs, that the highest costs that will be incurred for any of the available funds will be 0.07% of the value of the fund each year. These costs will be deducted by the fund manager from the fund’s assets.

These may change in the future. 

Here’s what you could pay to use Royal Bank Invest for a year when making monthly contributions…

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Platform Fee - £0.90 for the year

This covers the cost of administration and online access to your Royal Bank Invest account. The maximum you will pay is 0.15% of the value of your investment each year - down from 0.35% last year.

Fund Ongoing Charge - £3.00 for the year

This covers the cost of managing your investment. The maximum you will pay is 0.5% of the value of your investment each year - down from 0.6% last year.

Transaction Costs - £0.12 for the year

This is the cost of buying and selling shares and other investments that make up the fund. The fund manager estimates, based on actual past costs, that the highest costs that will be incurred for any of the available funds will be 0.07% of the value of the fund each year. These costs will be deducted by the fund manager from the fund’s assets. They remain unchanged from last year.

These may change in the future.

Based on a medium risk portfolio. For illustrative purposes only. The amount you pay will vary depending on the value of your investment. Data source: Royal Bank Invest. Data accurate as of 10 November 2021. Rates may change.

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Platform Fee - £1.80 for the year

This covers the cost of administration and att net pay bill phone number access to your Royal Bank Invest account. The maximum you will pay is 0.15% of the value of your investment each year - down from 0.35% last year.

Fund Ongoing Charge - £6.00 for the year

This covers the cost of managing your investment. The maximum you will pay is 0.5% of the value of your investment each year - down from 0.6% last year.

Transaction Costs - £0.24 for the year

This is the cost of buying and selling shares and other investments that make up the fund. The fund manager estimates, based on actual past costs, that the highest costs that will be incurred for any of the available funds will be 0.07% of the value of the fund each year. These costs will be deducted by the fund manager from the fund’s assets. They remain the reach key west spa from last year.

These may change in the future.

Based on a medium risk portfolio. For illustrative purposes only. The amount you pay will vary depending on the value of your investment. Data source: Royal Bank Invest. Data accurate as of 10 November 2021. Rates may change.

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Platform Fee - £4.50 for amazon discount code 2019 usa year

This covers the cost of administration and online access to your Royal Bank Invest account. The maximum you will pay is 0.15% of the value of your investment each year - down from 0.35% last year.

Fund Ongoing Charge - £15.00 for the year

This covers the cost of managing your investment. The maximum you will pay is 0.5% of the value of your investment each year - down from 0.6% last year.

Transaction Costs - £0.60 for the year

This is the cost of buying and selling shares and other investments that make up the fund. The fund manager estimates, based on actual past costs, that the highest costs that will be incurred for any of the available funds will be 0.07% of the value of the fund each year. These costs will be deducted by the fund manager from the fund’s assets. They remain unchnaged from last year.

These may change in the future.

Based on a medium risk portfolio. For illustrative purposes only. The amount you pay will vary depending on the value of your investment. Data source: Royal Bank Invest. Data accurate as of 10 November, 2021. Rates may change.

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Platform Fee - £9.00 for the year

This covers the cost of administration and online access to your Royal Bank Invest account. The maximum top 50 investment banks uk will pay is 0.15% of the value of your investment each year - down from 0.35% last year.

Fund Ongoing Charge - £30.00 for the year

This covers the cost of managing your investment. The maximum you will pay is 0.5% of the value of your investment each year - down from 0.6% last year.

Transaction Costs - £1.20 for the year

This is the cost of buying and selling shares and other investments that make up the fund. The fund manager pnc bank auto loan payment customer service, based on actual past costs, that the highest costs that will be incurred for any of the available funds will be 0.07% of the value of the fund each year. These costs will be deducted by the fund manager from the fund’s assets. They remain unchanged from last year. 

These may change in the future.

Based on a medium risk portfolio. For illustrative purposes only. The amount you pay will vary depending on the value of your investment. Data source: Royal Bank Invest. Data accurate as of 10 November 2021. Rates may change.

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Platform Fee - £18.00 for the year

This covers the cost of administration and online access to your Royal Bank Invest account. The maximum you will pay is 0.15% of the value of your investment each year - down from 0.35% last year.

Fund Ongoing Charge - £60.00 for the year

This covers the cost of managing your investment. The maximum you will pay is 0.5% of the value of your investment each year - down from 0.6% last year. 

Transaction Costs - £2.40 for the year

This is the cost of buying and selling shares and other investments that make up the fund. The fund manager estimates, based on actual past costs, that the highest costs that will be incurred for any of the available fccu ibranch login will be 0.07% of the value of the fund each year. These costs will be deducted by the fund manager from the fund’s assets. They remain unchanged from last year.

These may change in the future.

Based on a medium risk portfolio. For illustrative purposes only. The amount you pay will vary depending on the value of your investment. Data source: Royal Bank Invest. Data accurate as of 10 November 2021. Rates may change.

Already a Royal Bank Invest customer?

If you're already a Royal Bank Invest customer, you can track the progress of your investment as and when you want with your digital investment account.

Login to Royal Bank Invest

Yes.
You can choose to transfer any existing ISAs you have to Royal Bank Invest.

If you need advice deciding whether you should transfer, we're sorry but we can't help - our automated advice service only offers advice on investing your spare income and savings.

Coutts & Co do the investment management.

Made up of more than 60 investment specialists, the team at Coutts includes economists and investment analysts top 50 investment banks uk years of experience managing money.

The five funds are provided by RBS Asset Management (Dublin) Limited.

Before investing top 50 investment banks uk should consider:

Setting aside enough money in accessible savings to cover any emergencies - an amount of around 4 times your essential monthly expenditure is typically about right.

If your existing insurance and pension arrangements are sufficient for your needs.

Paying off any high interest debts that your money would be better used to repay.

You can make withdrawals at any time but generally the longer you invest for the more chance there is for growth on you investment. So if you invest you should be prepared to do so for 5 years or more. 

The value of investments can go down as well as up. This means you could get back less than your original investment.  New to investing? Learn more about the difference between saving and investing before you start to invest. 

The assets held within each of the Personal Portfolio Funds are held separately from the bank by an independent company called a depositary, which is authorised by the Central Bank of Ireland. So your investments would be safe even if Royal Bank of Scotland failed. Your investments through Royal Bank Invest may also be covered by the Financial Services Compensation Scheme in some scenarios.

For more details click here

If you're already investing with us you can log in to your Royal Bank Invest account for day to day transactions, or if you're concerned about the current situation and have questions about managing your investment during this time, please see our latest guidance and common questions. 

If you'd prefer to speak to us, you can call the Help and Support team on 0345 304 1005 (for Relay UK prefix the number with 18001). Our lines are open Monday to Friday, from 9.30am to 5pm. We're closed Bank Holidays. Calls may be recorded.

Yes, the Personal Portfolio Funds are! The shares and funds we select on your behalf are responsible investments. Responsible investing focuses on companies and industries who aim to positively affect our world in three key areas: environmental, social, and governance (ESG). Find out more.

Cashback offer terms and conditions (PDF, 1.5MB)

 

Q. How long was this offer available?

A. The offer started on 23 August and ended at the latest on September 30 2021.

The following questions give you some details of what was in the Cashback offer:

Q. Am I eligible for the offer?

A. This offer was open to top 50 investment banks uk, who do not currently invest with Royal Bank Invest. To qualify for this offer you must:

  • Set up an account with Royal Bank Invest by 30 September 2021
  • Make an initial lump sum investment of at least £100 between 23 August 2021 and 30 September 2021 inclusive
  • Start making regular monthly contributions of at least £50 into your account by 31 October 2021 and continue making them until at least 1 January 2022

Standard eligibility criteria apply: you must have online banking, be aged 18-84, have a current account with Royal Bank and be a UK resident for tax purposes. Junior ISA not eligible for offer.

Q. When will I receive my £50 cashback?

A. Provided you have met the eligibility criteria, the cash will be paid no later than 31 January 2022.

Q. How do I start making regular monthly contributions?

A. When setting up your investment for the first time, you will be asked ‘How much do you want to Invest’ and you’ll have the option of entering a single investment amount, monthly investment amount, or both. If you have already set-up your investment and would like to add a regular monthly contribution, you can do so by selecting your Personal Portfolio Fund and selecting ‘set up monthly contributions’. The minimum monthly amount that you can invest is £50.

Q. If I open multiple funds would I get multiple cashback?

A. The maximum cashback that we will pay to you is £50 regardless of the number of Royal Bank Invest eligible accounts you hold.

Q. If I have a joint current account will both myself and the joint account holder receive £50?

A. Provided you both have separate Invest accounts and eligibility criteria is met you will both receive cashback.

Log in and explore invest

Log in to the Royal Bank investment portal, you'll need your Online Banking details. You can see a forecast of how an investment could perform.

Complete your investment

Firstly, let us know if you want to choose your own investment or get automated advice. With automated advice there is a one-off fee of £10 for our advice if you invest. There will be no fee if we think investing isn’t right for you or if you don’t invest.

Sit back and relax

Coutts investment managers will invest your funds. Log back in at anytime to check your investment and top up.

Источник: https://www.rbs.co.uk/investments/royal-bank-invest.html

List of Top Banks in UK by Market Cap as on Jan 1st, 2020

List of Top Banks in UK by Market Cap as Jan 1st, 2020.
Market Value (Jan-01-2021)
Market Value (Jan 1st 2020)
Rank in Country (Jan-2021)
Company Rank in UK in 2021 is 23
Annual Results for Year Ending
Market Value (Jan-01-2021)
Market Value (Jan 1st 2020)
Rank in Country (Jan-2021)
Company Rank in UK in 2021 is 24
Annual Results for Year Ending
Market Value (Jan-01-2021)
Market Value (Jan 1st 2020)
Rank in Country (Jan-2021)
Company Rank in UK in 2021 is 217
Annual Results for Year Ending
Market Value (Jan-01-2021)
Market Value (Jan 1st 2020)
Rank in Country (Jan-2021)
Company Rank in UK in 2021 is 215
Annual Results for Year Ending
Market Value (Jan-01-2021)
Market Value (Jan 1st 2020)
Rank in Country (Jan-2021)
Company Rank in UK in 2021 is 286
Annual Results for Year Ending
Market Value (Jan-01-2021)
Market Value (Jan 1st 2020)
Rank in Country (Jan-2021)
Company Rank in UK in 2021 top 50 investment banks uk 433
Annual Results for Year Ending

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Источник: https://www.value.today/top-companies/top-banks-uk
top 50 investment banks uk

5 Replies to “Top 50 investment banks uk”

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