if i m hungry is my baby hungry

You have no clue if it's even okay to be feeding him this much. I wanted to know whether my baby was actually hungry, or seeking comfort. The English language has a large number of words that mean 'hungry'. This word is used when you are extremely hungry, not just feeling peckish. The most common question on every mama's mind: Is my newborn hungry or overtired? We often think that baby is hungry when they cry but in fact.

watch the thematic video

Temple Of The Dog - Hunger Strike

8 Super Filling Foods You Should Be Eating If You're Always Hungry

If hunger is your middle name and hanger follows you like the plague, your diet may be missing the ingredients that deliver sustainable energy and help keep big appetites at bay. A telltale sign is feeling ravenous when your SmartPoints® budget is near its limit. For a fast fix, start eating the foods that can help you feel full longer—so you spend your days feeling satisfied, not starving.

Here areeight science-backed picks to add more staying power to your meals and snacks:

1. Oatmeal


Prospective short term studies suggest oatmeal consumption helps lower body if i m hungry is my baby hungry index and body weight. Why? One reason is that oats are rich in soluble fibre, a type of fibre that becomes viscous and gel-like when combined with liquid, says Wendy Bazilian, DrPH, RD, coauthor of Eat Clean, Stay Lean: The Diet and owner of Bazilian’s Health in San Diego. The oats are thought to impact appetite reducing hormones which makes it more likely you’ll eat less, and they empty out of your stomach at a slower rate than simple carbs such as found in a doughnut for example.

But there’s one important caveat: Because soluble fibre needs liquid to thicken up, oats seem to be the most filling when they’re cooked in water or milk to make oatmeal. “A muffin or breakfast bar made with oats probably won’t have the same level of effect, since they don’t have as much water,” Bazilian says.

RELATED:Overnight Oats 3 Ways

2. Beans


Toss them into salad, use them in soup, or puree them into a dip. Adding beans and legumes like chickpeas, black beans, and lentils to a meal increases satiety by an average of 31%, according to a recent scientific review published in the journal Obesity.

When it comes to fullness, these tiny powerhouses seem to pack a one-two punch. They are complex carbohydrates, which deliver energy and they are rich in fibre. But they also have protein, which takes longer to process — which helps you stay satisfied for longer. “It’s a slow, sustained release of blood sugar, which can lengthen satiety,” Bazilian says.

RELATED:A Dozen Things to Do with Canned Beans

3. Non-starchy vegetables


Veggies like leafy greens, broccoli, cauliflower, asparagus, peppers, and celery have low calorie density. That means that they’re low in calories for their serving size—but because they’re high in water and fibre, they have more volume which means they take up more space in your stomach. “If you choose foods that have a lower density of calories in each bite, you’ll get a bigger portion for your calorie needs,” says Barbara Rolls, PhD, Director of the Laboratory for the Study of Human Ingestive Behavior at Penn State University and author of The Ultimate Volumetrics Diet.

Case in point: You’d have to eat more than two cups of cooked baby spinach to consume 100 calories, but you’d get the same amount of calories from just 1 measly tablespoon of butter. Which one do you think would fill you up more?

4. Eggs


Have them in the morning, and you just might feel fuller all day long. One study found that women who were overweight reported that they consumed less food for up to 36 hours when they ate eggs for breakfast, compared to when they ate bagels. (Talk about incredible, right?)

That could be because eggs are packed with protein—which digests at a slower rate than carbohydrate-based foods which helps keep you satisfied longer, says Bazilian. (A large egg delivers 6g protein.) But that’s not all. A small study also suggests that eggs could suppress the production of the hunger hormone ghrelin, which could help nix the urge to nosh.

RELATED:25 Unique Egg Recipes

5. Avocado


Research suggests that enjoying half an avocado with a meal can quell the urge to eat for hours. Likely, that’s because the green fruit delivers a healthy dose of fiber—which studies suggest may contribute to feelings of satiety.

There’s more to avocado’s appetite-squashing goodness, though. The smooth, creamy texture feels decadent—which in itself could make your meal seem more satisfying, Bazilian says. Just watch your portions. 

RELATED:Avocado 9 Ways

6. Nuts


A handful of almonds, walnuts, or peanuts may keep you going longer than a bag of cookies or chips. Nuts have been linked with suppressing the desire to eat—especially when eaten as a snack in between meals, according to one Purdue University review.

The combo of protein and healthy fats means that nuts get digested at a slower rate than carbohydrate-heavy fare. But eating whole nuts seems to be satisfying on a psychological level too. “There’s something about the synergy between the nutrition and the texture and crunch,” says Richard Mattes, PhD, Director of the Ingestive Behavior Research Center at Purdue University.

All nuts seem to have similar satiating properties, he adds. So pick the type you like best. Just be sure to keep your portions in check, since the SmartPoints of nuts can add up quickly.

RELATED:The Skinny on.Nuts and Seeds

7. Greek yogurt


A cup of Greek yogurt delivers around 22g protein, which will help reduce the desire to eat and keep you feeling full for longer. What’s more, it’s relatively high in water, so it adds volume in your stomach. Combined, those two things will keep you satisfied, Bazilian says.

Of course, not all yogurts are created equal. Plain yogurt is a better choice than the flavoured stuff, since it’s free of added sugars which, in excess, have been linked to increased risk for disease.

RELATED: Taste Test: The Best Non-Fat Plain Yogurt

8. Brothy soup


Starting with a soup can help curb calorie intake at mealtime, some studies show. Like non-starchy vegetables, soups have a low-calorie density—all that liquid will help fill you up for relatively few calories, Rolls says.

The key is sticking with broth- or tomato-based soups instead of cream-based ones. Think minestrone or butternut squash. For even more staying power—like if you’re having soup for a meal—consider adding a source of lean protein like shredded chicken, Rolls says.

RELATED:Thermos Soups, 5 Ways

Источник: https://www.weightwatchers.com/ca/en/article/8-super-filling-foods-you-should-be-eating-if-youre-always-hungry

5 Signs Your Toddler Is Hungry, Not Tired, Because It's So Hard To Tell

Very few parents would dispute that toddlers can be difficult to read. While they might be able to communicate more than they did as babies, many of them still aren't able to use the exact words necessary to get their point across, and they definitely have difficulty with concepts that are a little more abstract, like hunger, for example. That's exactly why you need to be on the look-out for these signs your toddler is hungry, not tired, because they're not very easy to tell apart.

We all do it, offer our kids a snack when they're hanging onto our knees whining something unintelligible. But experts say that it's important that you know your kid is hungry before blindly offering snacks. Pediatric dietitian and nutritionist Susie Burrell explained on Bellamy's Organic's site that that toddlers and small if i m hungry is my baby hungry actually have a difficult time understanding the true feeling of hunger. Giving a child snacks when they aren't truly hungry can be problematic for them in regulating and responding to their feelings of hunger as they grow older. In fact, according to Burrell, "This results in a child that learns to eat in response to a number of feelings (not just hunger), which leads to overeating." And that, in turn, can lead to an adolescent or adult who eats in response to their emotions, rather than their hunger level.

Differentiating between hunger and exhaustion with a toddler is easier said than done, but here are a few tips for figuring out exactly what your little one needs most — and for teaching them how to know when they're actually hungry or not.

1

They're Asking For A Healthy Snack

If your toddler is getting irritable and whining for candy canes (I know one such toddler very well), chances are, she's actually more tired than hungry and is starting to melt down while struggling to explain her discomfort. On the other hand, if your toddler is asking (or even whining) for a healthy snack, that can be a sign that their belly needs some fuel. Belly Belly reminded readers that healthy snacks can actually help prevent toddler meltdowns: "Healthy snacks will help prevent mood swings and difficult [behavior] due to low blood sugar levels."

2

They'll Eat Bland Food You Offer

Burrell has a quick trick for ascertaining whether your kiddo is actually hungry: offer them a bland snack, like an apple or other piece of fruit, rather than crackers or sweets. She explained, "If they reject that food type you can be happy they are not really hungry, but are just looking for something tasty to put in their mouth." That's not a bad test to give yourself if you're prone to indulging in unhealthy snacks between meals and not feeling so hot about it.

3

It's Not Time For Sleep

Kids, especially very young ones, often communicate hunger and tiredness in similar ways: by fussing, whining, or starting to show less than desirable behavior like throwing toys or making a mess. One clue that your kiddo is suffering from low blood sugar instead of needing an early bedtime is that your toddler "resorts to crying, fussiness, banging toys and temper tantrums if hunger takes over," noted an article on Gerber's site (and they're a company that knows a few things about feeding small humans). If it's not naptime or bedtime, try offering your toddler a healthy snack to see if that curbs his irritability.

4

Your Toddler Seems Anxious

If your toddler seems more panicked she usually does when she is in need of a nap, it could be hunger causing her anxiety. “Hunger is an anxious feeling,” said Laura Oyama, a professor of early childhood education at Toronto’s Humber College, to Today's Parent. “It undercuts a young child’s need to feel safe," which can make your child's tantrum a little more intense or wild.

5

It's Mealtime

If your kid is getting irritable around mealtime, that's a clear sign that they're hungry. This can be tricky timing with both lunch and dinner, because often your toddler is heading for bed shortly thereafter. If you are running into mealtime melt downs, consider moving the timing of his lunch or dinner up so that it's not coinciding with bedtime quite so much.

Registered dietician Natalia Stasenko suggested an easy tip for helping your child eat before they get overdone on Real Mom Nutrition, "Try serving dinner 30 minutes earlier so he eats when his energy levels are a little higher."

Check out Romper's new video series, Bearing The Motherload, where disagreeing parents from different sides of an issue sit down with a mediator and talk about how to support (and not judge) each other’s parenting perspectives. New episodes air Mondays on Facebook.

Источник: https://www.romper.com/p/5-signs-your-toddler-is-hungry-not-tired-because-its-easy-to-confuse-the-two-8069920

Why Is Your Baby Hungry All The Time?

Your top newborn feeding questions answered

It’s a shock to many new parents that just 48 hours after baby is born, you’re back at home and apart from the safe, secure cocoon of expert nurses at the hospital who stood ready to help and guide. Don’t worry—you’ve got this, and we’ve got the answers to the top 3 questions most parents have when it comes to feeding a newborn and knowing when your baby is hungry. In these first weeks after birth, you’re creating your milk supply, so rest when baby rests, and keep her close by so that you can catch her feeding cues.

#1: Is it normal for baby to seem hungry all the time?

So, you’re home after a busy birthing experience and your baby wants to nurse “all the time.” This is a typical and normal response from your newborn; in fact, your baby will likely want to nurse 10-12 times in those first days!

This may seem too frequent to family and friends who aren’t familiar with if i m hungry is my baby hungry to expect with a breastfeeding infant. But rest assured, most healthy newborns feed “on demand”, which means your baby will be nursing about every 2 hours with unlimited time at the breast each time.

#2: How will I know if my baby is hungry or just crying?

Your baby will give you clues to her hunger: She may smack or lick her lips, open and close her mouth, or suck on her tongue, lips, finger or toes. She may also fidget or “root” by turning her head toward your breast—and her food!

Crying is a late sign when it comes to if your baby is hungry. Don’t wait for crying or baby may be too upset to relax and latch on to your breast. If you find yourself in this state with baby, be patient, calm her and offer her your breast until she latches on.

#3: Should baby just keep feeding and feeding?

Sometimes, often in the evenings when you’re more tired, baby will want to feed more frequently, and for longer periods of time. These are called cluster feedings. The best thing is to find a comfortable place to nurse and let the others take care of the house and you. Keep baby close to you with a wrap so that she can feed frequently.

How often and for how long baby feeds is her way of helping you produce milk; it also calms baby and makes her feel secure. She’ll pull off samsung contact number usa breast when she’s done nursing. You can always offer her your other breast just in case, but if she’s truly done, start the next feeding with the other breast.

RELATED TOPICS

Busting the Top 10 Myths About Breastfeeding

Breastfeeding Is the Best Option to Feed Your Baby

Recognizing When Your Baby Has Gas

Feeding Baby: The First Year

Don’t forget to check out our Feeding Your Baby and Breastfeeding sections.

Joanne Goldbort, PhD, If i m hungry is my baby hungry, RN, is an assistant professor in the College of Nursing at Michigan State University and an expert nurse adviser to Healthy Mom&Baby.

Related Posts

Источник: https://www.health4mom.org/why-is-your-baby-hungry-all-the-time/

Should I try hungry baby formula milk?

Hungry baby formula may seem like the answer to your prayers after constant feeding, a regularly waking baby, or a growth spurt.

But what exactly is hungry – or hungrier – baby formula? How should you use it? Can it cause tummy problems, or increase the risk of your baby becoming overweight?

What is hungry baby formula?

Milks that say they are for ‘hungrier babies’ are based on the curd of cow’s milk, rather than the whey, and take babies longer to digest than first milks.

Although the proportions of macronutrients such as fat, protein and carbs are the same as regular formula, more of the protein is present as ‘casein’ (20:80) compared to first milks which have a whey: casein ratio of about 60:40.

Examples of hungry baby formula include:

  • Aptamil Hungry Infant Milk
  • Cow & Gate Infant Milk for Hungrier Babies
  • SMA Extra Hungry Infant Milk For Hungrier Babies
  • HiPP Organic 2 Combiotic Hungry Infant Milk

Why use hungry baby formula?

Health Visitor Jane Self has 35 years’ experience helping families with feeding and says it is important to recognise that “some babies are better on hungry baby milk and others are not”.

“Sometimes babies have been settled on first stage milk, going about 3 to 4 hours between the beginning of one feed and the beginning of the next, and then start to need milk much more frequently, say, 2-hourly,” she explains.

While some mums choose to start weaning if their baby is older than 4 months, current NHS advice is to wait until 6 months before weaning, so an alternative is to give hungrier baby formula.

Not everyone is convinced about how useful hungry baby formula is, though. Our favourite GP, Dr Philippa Kaye, told MadeForMums:

“There is not any evidence that babies sleep longer or are more settled when using the milks targeted at ‘hungry babies’…. anecdotally there may be, but I am forever saying that the plural of anecdote is not evidence and the evidence base is where doctors advise from. 

“The hungry formulas contain more casein than whey and caseine is more difficult to digest, they are suitable for use from birth but it is advised that you speak to your health visitor or doctor first.  I would tend to recommend that if your baby is hungry that they have more of breast milk or a first type formula milk. 

“You can mix breast and bottle feeding, combination feeding, even if you are using a hungry baby milk. 

“I think it is important to remember that not all baby crying is related to hunger, even if they suck and take milk, they may be taking for comfort rather than hunger.”

At what age can hungry baby formula be used?

This is a question that elicited a mixed response as, while hungry baby milks are sold as being suitable for use from birth, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust’s guide to infant formula says that the higher casein levels mean they are not ideal for very young babies.

The milks are regulated under the Infant Formula and Follow-on Formula (England) Regulations 2007, but a Department of Health spokesperson told MadeForMums it did not recommend their use for newborns and very young babies.

“We encourage breastfeeding for around the first 6 months of life because of the health benefits to mothers and babies, however, we recognise that not all mothers choose to, or are able to breastfeed,” he said.

Hungry baby milks contain more casein protein than first infant formula. There is no evidence that babies benefit when changing to these milks and they should be avoided for newborns or young babies.

Meanwhile, health visitor Jane advises: “In the UK it is quite acceptable to use these milks from newborn [but] it is more usual to start a baby on either breast milk or a first stage milk as these are considered easier for a new baby to digest.”

She adds that they would normally be used from about 4 months if a baby starts feeding frequently, at 2-hour intervals, but are not ready to be weaned as current advice is to start solid foods at 6 months.

However, many MadeForMumers say changing to hungry baby formula was a decision that worked for them.

Caroline explains: “We went onto hungry baby milk at 5 weeks and Bronwyn was feeding every 2 hours or so at that point. It was the best thing I could have done!!!”

Fellow MFMer DawnG agrees: “Cameron also went onto hungry baby milk at around 6wks as he was feeding every 2hrs day and night. My health visitor was against it and told me it was perfectly normal for him to be feeding so frequently, but for my own sanity I changed the milk and didn’t regret it one bit.”

Hungry baby formula at night

Many mums choose to use hungry baby formulas to help tackle sleep deprivation when feeding hits the 2-hourly pattern that Jane highlighted.

“There is no reason why a hungry baby formula milk should not be used day and night,” she says.

The key is to ensure they are being fed regularly enough, and are still gaining weight.

Officially, there is no evidence to show that babies sleep longer when given hungry baby formulas, but anecdotal reports show it may be helpful.

MadeForMumer Laura reveals: “Switched Jack to hungry baby Aptamil 4/5wks it changed everything he was so much more content sleeping 12 hours a night from 6 weeks.”

Can hungry baby formula cause tummy trouble?

Colic, reflux, and constipation are all concerns whenever you try your baby on a new feed, but Jane advises not being overly anxious.

“My experience is that constipation does sometimes occur in very young babies on hungry baby milk,” she reveals. However, she notes that she has not come across it causing other tummy problems or colic, but points out that very young babies might be better off on first-stage milk.

However, one MadeForMumer,Lucy, tried her son on hungry baby formula, but wasn’t happy with the effects on his tummy.

“We changed Ben onto hungrier babies milk, but he ended up having nasty colicky tummy ache on it and wasn’t very happy, so we changed him back to the normal formula and just fed a bit more frequently… Eventually we ended up weaning him a bit earlier than usual,” she says.

Can hungry baby formula increase the risk of baby becoming overweight?

According to Jane, unless the baby is given more hungry baby formula milk than they were having of regular baby milk there is no reason why they should become overweight.

In fact, she explains many babies take a smaller quantity of hungry baby formula, as they are satisfied more quickly with it.

However, research published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in March 2014 has found that lower intakes of protein in the first year of a baby’s life can reduce the risk of childhood obesity.

What is the best way to switch to hungry baby milk?

A gradual switchover is recommended, and Jane advises the following timetable:

  • Day 1 – change 1 bottle from first stage to hungry baby formula
  • Day 4 – change the next feed to hungry baby formula, so baby now has 2 bottles of hungry baby milk
  • Day 7 – change another feed to hungry baby formula, if required
  • Day 10 – repeat, if required

“This allows the baby’s digestion system to get used to a different milk gradually,” explains Jane. “I would suggest giving up to the same quantity as the baby was taking of first milk but not to be concerned if they take slightly less.”

Can hungry baby milk be used to top up breastfeeding?

Regular first milk is more similar to breast milk in terms of composition, so a more obvious choice for topping up, but Jane says there is no reason not to do so if the baby tends to be very hungry.

Mixed contra costa county library login was the method of choice for one mum, who found it helpful to able to take a break.

“I breastfed my baby, and bottle-fed both expressed milk and formula, It really helped as my husband fed her at night feed and we also gave her hungry baby milk before bed which helped her sleep through the night.”

Can mums switch between hungry baby formula and regular formula?

Chopping and changing is not a good idea, as it can lead to more agitation.

But, if you have tried hungry baby formula, and it hasn’t agreed with your baby, then “no harm will come over going back to regular formula,” reassures Jane.

“It is important not to keep changing as the baby’s system then finds it difficult and baby is likely to be unsettled,” she adds.

Pics: Getty

Read more

About the expert: Dr Philippa Kaye, a mum of 3,  serves as a GP in both NHS and private practise. She attended Downing College, Cambridge, then took medical studies at Guy’s, King’s and St Thomas’s medical schools in London.

She has trained in paediatrics, gynaecology, care of the elderly and acute medicine, psychiatry and general practise.

Dr Philippa has also written a number of books on topics including pregnancy, baby and child health, diabetes in childhood and adolescence and more. She has advised MadeForMums on numerous child health-related topics over the past 4 years. Read Dr Philippa’s full profile

Источник: https://www.madeformums.com/baby/should-i-try-hungry-baby-formula-milk/

How to Tell If Your Baby Is Full

Whether they’re bottle-feeding or breastfeeding, parents alternate between addressing baby’s hunger and being alert to signs baby is full. Just as there are if i m hungry is my baby hungry clear signs that a baby is hungry, there are clear signals that help a parent learn how to know when a newborn is full: They’ll turn their heads away from the breast or bottle, spit the extra food out, or fall asleep. But there are a few circumstances in which parents can miss the mark. 

“Sometimes parents will make the bottle’s nipple hole wider, so they can feed the baby faster, which can overwhelm babies and make them briefly full,” says Dr. Linda Palmer, author of the book Baby Poop. This temporary fullness leaves babies hungry shortly after. As a rule, Palmer says, parents should feed their babies regular amounts of milk or formula once every two hours. Less could leave them hungry, while more could lead to overfeeding. But she says most babies self-regulate quite efficiently.

“Feed ‘on-demand’ normally works best,” Palmer says. “Typically, babies will let you know if they are hungry.”

Is My Baby Full?

  • Follow the kid’s lead. Feed on demand, and make sure that very young babies are eating at least once every couple of hours — but only when they need to.
  • Stop feeding when they seem full. Look for obvious signs that the baby is full such as falling asleep, turning their head away, or starting to spit the food out.
  • Measure fullness with satiety, not completed bottles or jars. While using a single vessel to define the right quantity of food is convenient, a baby’s reaction to the food is much more telling.
  • Avoid sugary foods that can lead to overfeeding. Babies don’t need extra sugar in their food, and the deliciousness of it can encourage them to eat more food than they need to be comfortably full.

Not all foods encourage babies to regulate their own feeding, however. Sweetened foods can indeed override a full belly, Palmer says, and they are probably best avoided until mealtime routines are properly established. “Babies don’t need additional sugar in their foods,” Palmer says. “But some parents might be concerned that their baby needs more food, so they’ll give them some pudding or something like that.” Unless a physician has said if i m hungry is my baby hungry baby is underweight and they require more food and calories as part of a prescribed diet to get them to maintain a healthy weight, treats and sweetened food can be avoided altogether, Palmer says.

When your baby is feeding on-demand, it’s still important to observe how much your kid is eating. If they are spitting, getting gassy, or showing other signs that they are full but still going back for seconds or thirds at the breast, bottle, or jar, then that signifies that they might need help taking a break. “That is a sign to slow things down, or distract them, do something else, and come back to feeding later,” Palmer says.

Oops! Please try again.

Thanks for subscribing!

Источник: https://www.fatherly.com/parenting/how-to-tell-if-your-baby-is-full/

The New Face of Hunger

Millions of working Americans don’t know where their next meal is coming from. We sent three photographers to explore hunger in three very different parts of the United States, each giving different faces to the same statistic: One-sixth of Americans don’t have enough food to eat.

Click below to launch galleries

Photo of hunger in Osage, Iowa

Osage, Iowa
Photographs by Amy Toensing
On our nation’s richest lands, farmers grow corn and soybeans used to feed livestock, make cooking oil, and produce sweeteners. Yet one in eight Iowans often goes hungry, with children the most vulnerable to food insecurity.

Photo of hunger in Houston, Texas

Hunger in
the Land of Cars

Houston, Texas
Photographs by Kitra Cahana
Despite a strong economy, Houston is ringed by neighborhoods where many working families can’t afford groceries. Hunger has grown faster in America’s suburbs than in its cities over the past decade, creating a class of “SUV poor.”

Photo of hunger in Bronx, New York

Hunger in
the City of Plenty

Bronx, New York
Photographs by Stephanie Sinclair
Urban neighborhoods with pervasive unemployment and poverty are home to the hungriest. The South Bronx has the highest rate of food insecurity in the country, 37 percent, compared with 16.6 for New York City as a whole.

Photo of hunger in Osage, Iowa

Osage, Iowa
Photographs by Amy Toensing
On our nation’s richest lands, farmers grow corn and soybeans used to feed livestock, make cooking oil, and produce sweeteners. Yet one in eight Iowans often goes hungry, with children the most vulnerable to food insecurity.

Photo of hunger in Houston, Texas

Houston, Texas
Photographs by Kitra Cahana
Despite a strong economy, Houston is ringed by neighborhoods where many working families can’t afford groceries. Hunger has grown faster in America’s suburbs than in its cities over the past decade, creating a class of “SUV poor.”

Photo of hunger in Bronx, New York

Bronx, New York
Photographs by Stephanie Sinclair
Urban neighborhoods with pervasive unemployment and poverty are home to the hungriest. The South Bronx has the highest rate of food insecurity in the country, 37 percent, compared with 16.6 for New York City as a whole.

By Tracie McMillan

Photographs by Kitra Cahana, Stephanie Sinclair, and Amy Toensing

On a gold-gray morning in Mitchell County, Iowa, Christina Dreier sends her son, Keagan, to school without breakfast. He is three years old, barrel-chested, and stubborn, and usually refuses to eat the free meal he qualifies for at preschool. Faced with a dwindling pantry, Dreier has decided to try some tough love: If she sends Keagan to school hungry, maybe he’ll eat the free breakfast, which will leave more food at home for lunch.

Dreier knows her gambit might backfire, and it does. Keagan ignores the school breakfast on offer and is so hungry by lunchtime that Dreier picks through the dregs of her freezer in hopes of filling him and his little sister up. She shakes the last seven chicken nuggets onto a battered baking sheet, adds the remnants of a bag of Tater Tots and a couple of hot dogs from the fridge, and slides it all into the oven. She’s gone through most of the food she got last week from a local food pantry; her own lunch will be the bits of potato left on the kids’ plates. “I eat lunch if there’s enough,” she says. “But the kids are the most important. They have to eat first.”

The fear of being unable to feed her children hangs over Dreier’s days. She and her husband, Jim, pit one bill against the next—the phone against the rent against the heat against the gas—trying always to set aside money to make up for what they can’t get from the food pantry or with their food stamps, issued by the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). Congressional cuts to SNAP last fall of five billion dollars pared her benefits from $205 to $172 a month.

On this particular afternoon Dreier is worried about the family van, which is on the brink of repossession. She and Jim need to open a new bank account so they can make automatic payments instead of scrambling to pay in cash. But that will happen only if Jim finishes work early. It’s peak harvest time, and he often works until eight at night, applying pesticides on commercial farms for $14 an hour. Running the errand would mean forgoing overtime pay that could go for groceries.

It’s the same every month, Dreier says. Bills go unpaid because, when push comes to shove, food wins out. “We have to eat, you know,” she says, only the slightest hint of resignation in her voice. “We can’t starve.”

“It’s Not Enough”  Christina Dreier describes the difficulty of feeding her family on an inadequate budget.

Chances are good if i m hungry is my baby hungry if you picture what hunger looks like, you don’t summon an image of someone like Christina Dreier: white, married, clothed, and housed, even a bit overweight. The image of hunger in America today differs markedly from Depression-era images of the gaunt-faced unemployed scavenging for food on urban streets. “This is not your grandmother’s hunger,” says Janet Poppendieck, a sociologist at the City University of New York. “Today more working people and their families are hungry because wages have declined.”

In the United States more than half of hungry households are white, and two-thirds of those with children have at least one working adult—typically in a full-time job. With this new image comes a new lexicon: In 2006 the U.S. government replaced “hunger” with the term “food insecure” to describe any household where, sometime during the previous year, people didn’t have enough food to eat. By whatever name, the number of people going hungry has grown dramatically in the U.S., increasing to 48 million by 2012—a fivefold jump since the late 1960s, including an increase of 57 percent since the late 1990s. Privately run programs like food pantries and soup kitchens have mushroomed too. In 1980 there were a few hundred emergency food programs across the country; today there are 50,000. Finding food has become a central worry for millions of Americans. One in six reports running out of food at least once a year. In many European countries, by contrast, the number is closer to one in 20.

To witness hunger in America today is to enter a twilight zone where refrigerators are so frequently bare of all but mustard and ketchup that it provokes no remark, if i m hungry is my baby hungry no embarrassment. Here dinners are cooked using macaroni-and-cheese mixes and other processed ingredients from food pantries, and fresh fruits and vegetables are eaten only in the first days after the SNAP payment arrives. Here you’ll meet hungry farmhands and retired schoolteachers, hungry families who are in the U.S. without papers and hungry families whose histories stretch back to the Mayflower. Here pocketing food from work and skipping meals to make food stretch are so common that such practices barely register as a way of coping with hunger and are simply a way of life.

It can be tempting to ask families receiving food assistance, If you’re really hungry, then how can you be—as many of them are—overweight? The answer is “this paradox that hunger and obesity are two sides of the same coin,” says Melissa Boteach, vice president of the Poverty and Prosperity Program of the Center for American Progress, “people making trade-offs between food that’s filling but not nutritious and may actually contribute to obesity.” For many of the hungry in America, the extra pounds that result from a poor diet are collateral damage—an unintended side effect of hunger itself.

Help for the Hungry

More than 48 million Americans rely on what used to be called food stamps, now SNAP: the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program.

Map of SNAP participation in the United States

In 2013 benefits totaled $75 billion, but payments to most households dropped; the average monthly benefit was $133.07 a person, less than $1.50 a meal. SNAP recipients typically run through their monthly allotment in three weeks, then turn to food pantries. Who qualifies for SNAP? Households with gross incomes no more than 130 percent of the poverty rate. For a family of four that qualifying point is $31,005 a year.*

*Qualifying incomes in Alaska and Hawaii are higher than in the contiguous U.S.

As the face of hunger has changed, so has its address. The town of Spring, Texas, is where ranchland meets Houston’s sprawl, a suburb of curving streets and shade trees and privacy fences. The suburbs are the home of the American dream, but they are also a place where poverty is on the rise. As urban housing has gotten more expensive, the working poor have been pushed out. Today hunger in the suburbs is growing faster than in cities, having more than doubled since 2007.

Yet in the suburbs America’s hungry don’t look the part either. They drive cars, which are a necessity, not a luxury, here. Cheap clothes and toys can be found at yard sales and thrift shops, making a middle-class appearance affordable. Consumer electronics can be bought on installment plans, so the hungry rarely lack phones or televisions. Of all the suburbs in the country, northwest Houston is one of the best places to see how people live on what might be called a minimum-wage diet: It has one of the highest percentages of households receiving SNAP assistance where at least one family member holds down a if i m hungry is my baby hungry. The Jefferson sisters, Meme and Kai, live here in a four-bedroom, two-car-garage, two-bath home with Kai’s boyfriend, Frank, and an extended family that includes their invalid mother, their five sons, a daughter-in-law, and five grandchildren. The house has a rickety desktop computer in the living room and a television in most rooms, but only two actual beds; nearly everyone sleeps on mattresses or piles of blankets spread out on the floor.

Though all three adults work full-time, their income is not enough to keep the family consistently fed without assistance. The root problem is the lack of jobs that pay wages a family can live on, so food assistance has become the government’s—and society’s—way to supplement low wages. The Jeffersons receive $125 in food stamps each month, and a charity brings in meals for their bedridden matriarch.

Like most of the new American hungry, the Jeffersons face not a total absence of food but the gnawing fear that the next meal can’t be counted on. When Meme shows me the family’s food supply, the refrigerator holds takeout boxes and beverages but little fresh food. Two cupboards are stocked with a smattering of canned beans and sauces. A pair of freezers in the garage each contain a single layer of food, enough to fill bellies for just a few days. Meme says she took the children aside a few months earlier to tell them they were eating too much and wasting food besides. “I told them if they keep wasting, we have to go live on the corner, beg for money, or something.”

Stranded in a Food Desert

Tens of thousands of people in Houston and in other parts of the U.S. live in a food desert: They’re more than half a mile from a supermarket and don’t own a car, because of poverty, illness, or age. Public transportation may not fill the gap. Small markets or fast-food restaurants may be within walking distance, but not all accept vouchers. If they do, costs may be higher and nutritious options fewer.

Map of food deserts in Houston, Texas

Jacqueline Christian is another Houston mother who has a full-time job, drives a comfortable sedan, and wears flattering clothes. Her older son, 15-year-old Ja’Zarrian, sports bright orange Air Jordans. There’s little clue to the family’s hardship until you learn that their clothes come mostly from discount stores, that Ja’Zarrian mowed lawns for a summer to get the sneakers, that they’re living in a homeless shelter, and that despite receiving $325 in monthly food stamps, Christian worries about not having enough food “about half of the year.”

Christian works as a home health aide, earning $7.75 an hour at a job that requires her to crisscross Houston’s sprawl to see her clients. Her schedule, as much as her wages, influences what she eats. To save time she often relies on premade food from grocery stores. “You can’t go all the way home and cook,” she says.

On a day that includes running a dozen errands and charming her payday loan officer into giving her an extra day, Christian picks up Ja’Zarrian and her seven-year-old, Jerimiah, after school. As the sun drops in the sky, Jerimiah begins complaining that he’s hungry. The neon glow of a Hartz Chicken Buffet appears up the road, and he starts in: Can’t we just get some gizzards, please?

Christian pulls into the drive-through and orders a combo of fried gizzards and okra for $8.11. It takes three declined credit cards and an emergency loan from her mother, who lives nearby, before she can pay for it. When the food finally arrives, filling the car with the smell of hot grease, there’s a collective sense of relief. On the drive back to the shelter the boys eat until the gizzards are gone, and then drift off to sleep.

Christian says she knows she can’t afford to eat out and that fast food isn’t a healthy meal. But she’d felt too stressed—by time, by Jerimiah’s insistence, by how little money she has—not to give in. “Maybe I can’t justify that to someone who wasn’t here to see, you know?” she says. “But I couldn’t let them down and not get the food.”

Photos of the Reams family foraging for food

To supplement what they get from the food pantry, the cash-strapped Reams family forages in the woods near their Osage home for puffball mushrooms and grapes. Kyera Reams cans homegrown vegetables when they are in season and plentiful, so that her family can eat healthfully all year. “I’m resourceful with my food,” she says. “I think about what people did in the Great Depression.”

Of course it is possible to eat well cheaply in America, but it takes resources and know-how that many low-income Americans don’t have. Kyera Reams of Osage, Iowa, puts an incredible amount of energy into feeding her family of six a healthy diet, with the help of staples from food banks and $650 in monthly SNAP benefits. A stay-at-home mom with a high school education, Reams has taught herself how to can fresh produce and forage for wild ginger and cranberries. When she learned that SNAP benefits could be used to buy vegetable plants, she dug two gardens in her yard. She has learned about wild mushrooms so she can safely pick ones that aren’t poisonous and has lobbied the local library to stock field guides to edible wild plants.

“We wouldn’t eat healthy at all if we lived off the food-bank food,” Reams says. Many foods commonly donated to—or bought by—food pantries are high in salt, sugar, and fat. She estimates her family could live for three months on the nutritious foods she’s saved up. The Reamses have food security, in other words, because Kyera makes procuring food her full-time job, along with caring for her husband, whose disability payments provide their only income.

But most of the working poor don’t have the time or know-how required to eat well on little. Often working multiple jobs and night shifts, they tend to eat on the run. Healthful food can be hard to find in so-called food deserts—communities with few or no full-service groceries. Jackie Christian didn’t resort to feeding her sons fried gizzards because it was affordable but because it was easy. Given the dramatic increase in cheap fast foods and processed foods, when the hungry have money to eat, they often go for what’s convenient, just as better-off families do.

Senior Care  In rural Arkansas many elderly people don’t have enough to eat and rely on food banks for help. Charolette Tidwell and Ken Kupchick work tirelessly to make sure every person is fed.

It’s a cruel irony that people in rural Iowa can be malnourished amid forests of cornstalks running to the horizon. Iowa dirt is some of the richest in the nation, even bringing out the poet in agronomists, who describe it as “black gold.” In 2007 Iowa’s fields produced roughly one-sixth of all corn and soybeans grown in the U.S., churning out billions of bushels.

These are the very crops that end up on Christina Dreier’s kitchen table in the form of hot dogs made of corn-raised beef, Mountain Dew sweetened with corn syrup, and chicken nuggets fried in soybean oil. They’re also the foods that the U.S. government supports the most. In 2012 it spent roughly $11 billion to subsidize and insure commodity crops like corn and soy, with Iowa among the states receiving the highest subsidies. The government spends much less to bolster the production of the fruits and vegetables its own nutrition guidelines say should make up half the food on our plates. In 2011 it spent only $1.6 billion to subsidize and insure “specialty crops”—the bureaucratic term for fruits and vegetables.

Those priorities are reflected at the grocery store, where the price of fresh food has risen steadily while the cost of sugary treats like soda has dropped. Since the early 1980s the real cost of fruits and vegetables has increased by 24 percent. Meanwhile the cost of nonalcoholic beverages—primarily sodas, most sweetened with corn syrup—has dropped by 27 percent.

“We’ve created a system that’s geared toward keeping overall food prices low but does little to support healthy, high-quality food,” says global food expert Raj Patel. “The problem can’t be fixed by merely telling people to eat their fruits and vegetables, because at heart this is a problem about wages, about poverty.”

When Christina Dreier’s cupboards start to get bare, she tries to persuade her kids to skip snack time. “But sometimes they eat saltine crackers, if i m hungry is my baby hungry we get that from the food bank,” she said, sighing. “It examples of 1st 2nd and 3rd degree murders healthy for them, but I’m not going to tell them they can’t eat if they’re hungry.”

The Dreiers have not given up on trying to eat well. Like the Reamses, they’ve sown patches of vegetables and a stretch of sweet corn in the large green yard carved out of the cornfields behind their house. But when the garden is done for the year, Christina fights a battle every time she goes to the supermarket or the food bank. In both places healthy foods are nearly out of reach. When the food stamps come in, she splurges on her monthly supply of produce, including a bag of organic grapes and a bag of apples. “They love fruit,” she says with obvious pride. But most of her food dollars go to the meat, eggs, and milk that the food bank doesn’t provide; with noodles and sauce from the food pantry, a spaghetti dinner costs her only the $3.88 required to buy hamburger for the sauce.

What she has, Christina says, is a kitchen with nearly enough food most of the time. It’s just those dicey moments, after a new bill arrives or she needs gas to drive the kids to town, that make it hard. “We’re not starved around here,” she says one morning as she mixes up powdered milk for her daughter. “But some days, we do go a little hungry.”

Crops Taxpayers Support With Subsidies

Federal crop subsidies began in the 1920s, when a quarter of the U.S. population worked on farms. The funds were meant to buffer losses from fluctuating harvests and natural disasters. Today most subsidies go to a few staple crops, produced mainly by large agricultural companies and cooperatives.

Chart of top farm subsidies by crop

How Subsidized Crops Affect Diet

Subsidized corn is used for biofuel, corn syrup, and, mixed with soybeans, chicken feed. Subsidies reduce crop prices but also support the abundance of processed foods, which are more affordable but less nutritious. Across income brackets, processed foods make up a large part of the American diet.

Chart of top sources of calories for low-income individuals

Tracie McMillan is the author of The American Way of Eating and a Senior Fellow at the Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism at Brandeis University. Photographers Kitra Cahana, Stephanie Sinclair, and Amy Toensing are known for their intimate, sensitive portraits of people.

The magazine thanks The Rockefeller Foundation and members of the National Geographic Society for their generous support of this series of articles.

Maps and graphics by Virginia W. Mason and Jason Treat, NGM Staff. Help for the Hungry, sources: USDA; Food Research and Action Center; Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. Stranded in a Food Desert, sources: USDA; City of Houston; U.S. Census Bureau. Crop Subsidies, research: Amanda Hobbs. Sources: Mississippi Department of Human Services; Environmental Working Group; National Cancer Institute.

Food Shorts
What can you get for ten dollars?

Источник: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/foodfeatures/hunger/

Overeating in Children and Teens

Sometimes it may seem your child or teen eats all the time. It may seem he or she is eating lots of snacks between meals or overeating at meals. How do you know if this behavior is something to worry about or something normal that will pass? What can you do to help you child keep a healthy weight and avoid overeating?

Path to improved health

A child’s eating habits develop early in life, perhaps between the ages of 1 to 2 years. That’s why it’s important for parents to teach and encourage healthy eating habits. These examples should be started at an early age and continue through the teenage years. Here are some ways you can do that:

  • Be a good role model. Choose healthy foods and snacks for yourself.
  • Have healthy snacks in your home. For example, stock fruits like apples and bananas, raw vegetables like carrots and celery, or low-fat yogurt.
  • Include plenty of low-fat proteins, vegetables, and whole grains in the meals you make.
  • Offer your child healthy food, even if he or she doesn’t want it. Children aren’t always open to new things. But if you continue to offer healthy choices, you’ll improve the chances he or she will develop healthy eating habits.
  • Teach your child how to make healthy choices for school lunches.
  • Avoid fast-food dining. If you do eat at a fast-food or sit-down restaurant, choose the healthiest meals available.
  • Avoid sugary drinks such as sodas and sweet teas. Limit children to no more than one glass of fruit juice each day.
  • Forget the “clean plate rule.” Your child should stop eating when he or she feels full.
  • Don’t use food as a reward. Instead, reward good behaviors with a fun family activity (for example, go bowling rather than have ice cream).

Benefits of physical activity

Encourage your child or teen to be physically active. This offers many health benefits, including:

  • Helps the body burn calories instead of storing them as body fat.
  • Helps keep blood sugar levels more balanced and in a normal range (especially important for children who have, or are at risk for, diabetes).
  • Lowers blood pressure and cholesterol levels.
  • Helps make bones and muscles strong.
  • Builds strength and endurance.
  • Decreases stress and improves sleep and mental well-being.
  • Improves self-esteem by helping children feel better about their bodies and appearance.
  • Prevents serious health problems that can come with being overweight and obesity.

The American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) recognizes that regular physical activity is essential for healthy growth and development and encourages that all children and adolescents accumulate at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous aerobic physical activity every day. The AAFP also encourages parents and schools to make physical activity a priority. Prolonged periods of physical inactivity should also be discouraged both at home and at school.

There are ways you can help your child become physically active:

  • Limit your child’s screen time to no more than 2 hours a day. Screen time includes playing video or computer games, surfing the internet, texting, and watching TV or DVDs. Set a good example by limiting your own screen time, too.
  • Help your child find physical activities he or she enjoys. For example, your child might enjoy participating in team sports, dancing, playing outdoors, or doing volunteer work.
  • Make physical activity part of your whole family’s lifestyle. Take a walk, go for a bike ride, or do chores together. Plan active family outings.

Should I consider a weight-loss diet for my child?

Don’t put your child on a weight-loss diet without talking to your doctor first. Children need a certain number of calories and nutrients to grow, learn, and develop.

When is it normal for my child or teen to eat more than usual?

Sometimes it’s normal for your child or teen to eat more than usual. He or she may do so—and put on some extra weight—right before a growth spurt in height. This type of weight usually passes quickly as your child continues to grow.

Things to consider

For some children and teens, overeating may be a sign of an eating problem. This could include emotional eating or an eating disorder, such as binge eating disorder.

What is emotional eating?

Emotional eating is eating for comfort, out of boredom, or in response to emotions rather than eating for nutrition or because you’re hungry. Emotional eating can lead to overeating because it isn’t usually about a need for nutrients or calories. Your child’s body doesn’t need the food. Over time, taking in extra calories may cause your child to gain weight and become overweight or obese. Overeating can also cause your child to feel guilty or embarrassed.

If you notice signs of emotional eating in your child, talk to him or her about your concerns. Help your child develop a healthy response to his or her problems, such as focusing on solutions.

What is binge eating disorder?

Eating disorders usually develop during the teenage years or in early adulthood. Binge eating disorder is an eating disorder in which a person regularly consumes large amounts of food in a short time. People who have binge eating disorder are often embarrassed by the amount of food they eat.

They may hide food for binges. People who have this disorder often try to diet without success, or they promise to stop eating so much. They feel they can’t control the urge to eat large amounts of food. As a result, they tend to become overweight or obese.

If you’re concerned your child may have an eating disorder, watch his or her behavior and talk to your family doctor. Your doctor can evaluate your child and recommend the best way to help.

What are the health risks of overeating?

Overeating can lead to weight gain. Children who are overweight or obese are at risk for serious health problems as they get older, including:

  • Heart disease.
  • Diabetes.
  • High blood pressure.
  • High cholesterol.
  • Asthma.
  • Sleep apnea.
  • Some types of cancer.

Binge eating disorder can also cause stomach problems and is associated with symptoms of depression.

Questions for if i m hungry is my baby hungry doctor

  • What should I do if my child won’t eat anything healthy?
  • My child is hungry between meals. Should he or she be allowed snacks?
  • Is it okay if my child doesn’t eat meat?
  • My teen doesn’t like to eat in front of anyone. Should I worry?
  • My teen is always dieting, and I’m concerned. What can I do?

Resources

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Improving Your Eating Habits

Family Doctor Logo

Copyright © American Academy of Family Physicians

This information provides a general overview and may not apply to everyone. Talk to your family doctor to find out if this information applies to you and to get more information on this subject.

Источник: https://familydoctor.org/overeating-in-children-and-teens/

If i m hungry is my baby hungry -

Feeding your baby: When to start with solid foods

Up to 6 months old

From the first hour of life, through to 6 months old, your baby can receive all of the nutrition she needs to grow and develop from your milk. She doesn’t need anything else – no water, tea, juice, porridge or any other foods or fluids during this period.

Myth: Babies need solid food sooner than 6 months old

When you breastfeed your baby frequently, starting foods earlier than 6 months is not necessary and can even be harmful.

Introducing foods or fluids other than breastmilk to your baby before she is 6 months old can increase her risk of illnesses, such as diarrhoea, which can make her thin and weak, and even be life-threatening. Your baby may also breastfeed less often, so your supply of milk, her most vital food, may decrease.

A mother’s milk is the safest and healthiest food for the first 6 months of life for all children everywhere. It is a constant, safe source of essential nutrition, wherever you and your baby live in the world.

Feeding signs

If you see your baby with her hands near her mouth when she’s still younger than 6 months, you may think she’s not getting enough to eat from your milk alone. Actually your baby is showing normal feeding signs, they are just more developed now that she’s older. It doesn’t mean your baby needs solid food early. Your baby is ready when she is 6 months old.


Myth: Boys need more than breastmilk 

Both baby girls and boys need the same amount of food to be healthy and grow strong and smart. Your milk alone will meet the nutrition needs of both a son or a daughter in these first months of life.



6 months and older

When your baby reaches 6 months, his rapid growth and development require more energy and nutrients than your milk alone can provide. He needs to start eating solid foods in addition to breastmilk to keep up with his growing needs. 


When to feed your baby solid foods

Feed your baby whenever you see him give feeding signs. After washing hands with soap, start by giving your baby just two to three spoonfuls of soft food, such as porridge, mashed fruits or vegetables, twice a day. Continue to breastfeed as often as before. 


Non-breastfed babies

If you do not breastfeed your baby, the best time to introduce her to solid foods is also at 6 months of age. This is the age when all babies, breastfed or not, need to start getting solid foods to ensure they are getting all the nutrition their growing bodies need.


Living with HIV

If you are living with HIV, introduce your baby to his first solid foods at 6 months and continue to breastfeed him while taking your ARV medicines and following your treatment plan.


Don't wait too long to start solid food

Your baby’s body needs the extra energy and nutrients to help him to keep growing. Waiting too long may cause your baby to stop gaining weight at a healthy rate, and put him at risk of becoming thin and weak. 

Источник: https://www.unicef.org/parenting/food-nutrition/feeding-your-baby-when-to-start-solid-foods

Overeating in Children and Teens

Sometimes it may seem your child or teen eats all the time. It may seem he or she is eating lots of snacks between meals or overeating at meals. How do you know if this behavior is something to worry about or something normal that will pass? What can you do to help you child keep a healthy weight and avoid overeating?

Path to improved health

A child’s eating habits develop early in life, perhaps between the ages of 1 to 2 years. That’s why it’s important for parents to teach and encourage healthy eating habits. These examples should be started at an early age and continue through the teenage years. Here are some ways you can do that:

  • Be a good role model. Choose healthy foods and snacks for yourself.
  • Have healthy snacks in your home. For example, stock fruits like apples and bananas, raw vegetables like carrots and celery, or low-fat yogurt.
  • Include plenty of low-fat proteins, vegetables, and whole grains in the meals you make.
  • Offer your child healthy food, even if he or she doesn’t want it. Children aren’t always open to new things. But if you continue to offer healthy choices, you’ll improve the chances he or she will develop healthy eating habits.
  • Teach your child how to make healthy choices for school lunches.
  • Avoid fast-food dining. If you do eat at a fast-food or sit-down restaurant, choose the healthiest meals available.
  • Avoid sugary drinks such as sodas and sweet teas. Limit children to no more than one glass of fruit juice each day.
  • Forget the “clean plate rule.” Your child should stop eating when he or she feels full.
  • Don’t use food as a reward. Instead, reward good behaviors with a fun family activity (for example, go bowling rather than have ice cream).

Benefits of physical activity

Encourage your child or teen to be physically active. This offers many health benefits, including:

  • Helps the body burn calories instead of storing them as body fat.
  • Helps keep blood sugar levels more balanced and in a normal range (especially important for children who have, or are at risk for, diabetes).
  • Lowers blood pressure and cholesterol levels.
  • Helps make bones and muscles strong.
  • Builds strength and endurance.
  • Decreases stress and improves sleep and mental well-being.
  • Improves self-esteem by helping children feel better about their bodies and appearance.
  • Prevents serious health problems that can come with being overweight and obesity.

The American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) recognizes that regular physical activity is essential for healthy growth and development and encourages that all children and adolescents accumulate at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous aerobic physical activity every day. The AAFP also encourages parents and schools to make physical activity a priority. Prolonged periods of physical inactivity should also be discouraged both at home and at school.

There are ways you can help your child become physically active:

  • Limit your child’s screen time to no more than 2 hours a day. Screen time includes playing video or computer games, surfing the internet, texting, and watching TV or DVDs. Set a good example by limiting your own screen time, too.
  • Help your child find physical activities he or she enjoys. For example, your child might enjoy participating in team sports, dancing, playing outdoors, or doing volunteer work.
  • Make physical activity part of your whole family’s lifestyle. Take a walk, go for a bike ride, or do chores together. Plan active family outings.

Should I consider a weight-loss diet for my child?

Don’t put your child on a weight-loss diet without talking to your doctor first. Children need a certain number of calories and nutrients to grow, learn, and develop.

When is it normal for my child or teen to eat more than usual?

Sometimes it’s normal for your child or teen to eat more than usual. He or she may do so—and put on some extra weight—right before a growth spurt in height. This type of weight usually passes quickly as your child continues to grow.

Things to consider

For some children and teens, overeating may be a sign of an eating problem. This could include emotional eating or an eating disorder, such as binge eating disorder.

What is emotional eating?

Emotional eating is eating for comfort, out of boredom, or in response to emotions rather than eating for nutrition or because you’re hungry. Emotional eating can lead to overeating because it isn’t usually about a need for nutrients or calories. Your child’s body doesn’t need the food. Over time, taking in extra calories may cause your child to gain weight and become overweight or obese. Overeating can also cause your child to feel guilty or embarrassed.

If you notice signs of emotional eating in your child, talk to him or her about your concerns. Help your child develop a healthy response to his or her problems, such as focusing on solutions.

What is binge eating disorder?

Eating disorders usually develop during the teenage years or in early adulthood. Binge eating disorder is an eating disorder in which a person regularly consumes large amounts of food in a short time. People who have binge eating disorder are often embarrassed by the amount of food they eat.

They may hide food for binges. People who have this disorder often try to diet without success, or they promise to stop eating so much. They feel they can’t control the urge to eat large amounts of food. As a result, they tend to become overweight or obese.

If you’re concerned your child may have an eating disorder, watch his or her behavior and talk to your family doctor. Your doctor can evaluate your child and recommend the best way to help.

What are the health risks of overeating?

Overeating can lead to weight gain. Children who are overweight or obese are at risk for serious health problems as they get older, including:

  • Heart disease.
  • Diabetes.
  • High blood pressure.
  • High cholesterol.
  • Asthma.
  • Sleep apnea.
  • Some types of cancer.

Binge eating disorder can also cause stomach problems and is associated with symptoms of depression.

Questions for your doctor

  • What should I do if my child won’t eat anything healthy?
  • My child is hungry between meals. Should he or she be allowed snacks?
  • Is it okay if my child doesn’t eat meat?
  • My teen doesn’t like to eat in front of anyone. Should I worry?
  • My teen is always dieting, and I’m concerned. What can I do?

Resources

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Improving Your Eating Habits

Family Doctor Logo

Copyright © American Academy of Family Physicians

This information provides a general overview and may not apply to everyone. Talk to your family doctor to find out if this information applies to you and to get more information on this subject.

Источник: https://familydoctor.org/overeating-in-children-and-teens/

5 Signs Your Toddler Is Hungry, Not Tired, Because It's So Hard To Tell

Very few parents would dispute that toddlers can be difficult to read. While they might be able to communicate more than they did as babies, many of them still aren't able to use the exact words necessary to get their point across, and they definitely have difficulty with concepts that are a little more abstract, like hunger, for example. That's exactly why you need to be on the look-out for these signs your toddler is hungry, not tired, because they're not very easy to tell apart.

We all do it, offer our kids a snack when they're hanging onto our knees whining something unintelligible. But experts say that it's important that you know your kid is hungry before blindly offering snacks. Pediatric dietitian and nutritionist Susie Burrell explained on Bellamy's Organic's site that that toddlers and small children actually have a difficult time understanding the true feeling of hunger. Giving a child snacks when they aren't truly hungry can be problematic for them in regulating and responding to their feelings of hunger as they grow older. In fact, according to Burrell, "This results in a child that learns to eat in response to a number of feelings (not just hunger), which leads to overeating." And that, in turn, can lead to an adolescent or adult who eats in response to their emotions, rather than their hunger level.

Differentiating between hunger and exhaustion with a toddler is easier said than done, but here are a few tips for figuring out exactly what your little one needs most — and for teaching them how to know when they're actually hungry or not.

1

They're Asking For A Healthy Snack

If your toddler is getting irritable and whining for candy canes (I know one such toddler very well), chances are, she's actually more tired than hungry and is starting to melt down while struggling to explain her discomfort. On the other hand, if your toddler is asking (or even whining) for a healthy snack, that can be a sign that their belly needs some fuel. Belly Belly reminded readers that healthy snacks can actually help prevent toddler meltdowns: "Healthy snacks will help prevent mood swings and difficult [behavior] due to low blood sugar levels."

2

They'll Eat Bland Food You Offer

Burrell has a quick trick for ascertaining whether your kiddo is actually hungry: offer them a bland snack, like an apple or other piece of fruit, rather than crackers or sweets. She explained, "If they reject that food type you can be happy they are not really hungry, but are just looking for something tasty to put in their mouth." That's not a bad test to give yourself if you're prone to indulging in unhealthy snacks between meals and not feeling so hot about it.

3

It's Not Time For Sleep

Kids, especially very young ones, often communicate hunger and tiredness in similar ways: by fussing, whining, or starting to show less than desirable behavior like throwing toys or making a mess. One clue that your kiddo is suffering from low blood sugar instead of needing an early bedtime is that your toddler "resorts to crying, fussiness, banging toys and temper tantrums if hunger takes over," noted an article on Gerber's site (and they're a company that knows a few things about feeding small humans). If it's not naptime or bedtime, try offering your toddler a healthy snack to see if that curbs his irritability.

4

Your Toddler Seems Anxious

If your toddler seems more panicked she usually does when she is in need of a nap, it could be hunger causing her anxiety. “Hunger is an anxious feeling,” said Laura Oyama, a professor of early childhood education at Toronto’s Humber College, to Today's Parent. “It undercuts a young child’s need to feel safe," which can make your child's tantrum a little more intense or wild.

5

It's Mealtime

If your kid is getting irritable around mealtime, that's a clear sign that they're hungry. This can be tricky timing with both lunch and dinner, because often your toddler is heading for bed shortly thereafter. If you are running into mealtime melt downs, consider moving the timing of his lunch or dinner up so that it's not coinciding with bedtime quite so much.

Registered dietician Natalia Stasenko suggested an easy tip for helping your child eat before they get overdone on Real Mom Nutrition, "Try serving dinner 30 minutes earlier so he eats when his energy levels are a little higher."

Check out Romper's new video series, Bearing The Motherload, where disagreeing parents from different sides of an issue sit down with a mediator and talk about how to support (and not judge) each other’s parenting perspectives. New episodes air Mondays on Facebook.

Источник: https://www.romper.com/p/5-signs-your-toddler-is-hungry-not-tired-because-its-easy-to-confuse-the-two-8069920

Should I try hungry baby formula milk?

Hungry baby formula may seem like the answer to your prayers after constant feeding, a regularly waking baby, or a growth spurt.

But what exactly is hungry – or hungrier – baby formula? How should you use it? Can it cause tummy problems, or increase the risk of your baby becoming overweight?

What is hungry baby formula?

Milks that say they are for ‘hungrier babies’ are based on the curd of cow’s milk, rather than the whey, and take babies longer to digest than first milks.

Although the proportions of macronutrients such as fat, protein and carbs are the same as regular formula, more of the protein is present as ‘casein’ (20:80) compared to first milks which have a whey: casein ratio of about 60:40.

Examples of hungry baby formula include:

  • Aptamil Hungry Infant Milk
  • Cow & Gate Infant Milk for Hungrier Babies
  • SMA Extra Hungry Infant Milk For Hungrier Babies
  • HiPP Organic 2 Combiotic Hungry Infant Milk

Why use hungry baby formula?

Health Visitor Jane Self has 35 years’ experience helping families with feeding and says it is important to recognise that “some babies are better on hungry baby milk and others are not”.

“Sometimes babies have been settled on first stage milk, going about 3 to 4 hours between the beginning of one feed and the beginning of the next, and then start to need milk much more frequently, say, 2-hourly,” she explains.

While some mums choose to start weaning if their baby is older than 4 months, current NHS advice is to wait until 6 months before weaning, so an alternative is to give hungrier baby formula.

Not everyone is convinced about how useful hungry baby formula is, though. Our favourite GP, Dr Philippa Kaye, told MadeForMums:

“There is not any evidence that babies sleep longer or are more settled when using the milks targeted at ‘hungry babies’…. anecdotally there may be, but I am forever saying that the plural of anecdote is not evidence and the evidence base is where doctors advise from. 

“The hungry formulas contain more casein than whey and caseine is more difficult to digest, they are suitable for use from birth but it is advised that you speak to your health visitor or doctor first.  I would tend to recommend that if your baby is hungry that they have more of breast milk or a first type formula milk. 

“You can mix breast and bottle feeding, combination feeding, even if you are using a hungry baby milk. 

“I think it is important to remember that not all baby crying is related to hunger, even if they suck and take milk, they may be taking for comfort rather than hunger.”

At what age can hungry baby formula be used?

This is a question that elicited a mixed response as, while hungry baby milks are sold as being suitable for use from birth, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust’s guide to infant formula says that the higher casein levels mean they are not ideal for very young babies.

The milks are regulated under the Infant Formula and Follow-on Formula (England) Regulations 2007, but a Department of Health spokesperson told MadeForMums it did not recommend their use for newborns and very young babies.

“We encourage breastfeeding for around the first 6 months of life because of the health benefits to mothers and babies, however, we recognise that not all mothers choose to, or are able to breastfeed,” he said.

Hungry baby milks contain more casein protein than first infant formula. There is no evidence that babies benefit when changing to these milks and they should be avoided for newborns or young babies.

Meanwhile, health visitor Jane advises: “In the UK it is quite acceptable to use these milks from newborn [but] it is more usual to start a baby on either breast milk or a first stage milk as these are considered easier for a new baby to digest.”

She adds that they would normally be used from about 4 months if a baby starts feeding frequently, at 2-hour intervals, but are not ready to be weaned as current advice is to start solid foods at 6 months.

However, many MadeForMumers say changing to hungry baby formula was a decision that worked for them.

Caroline explains: “We went onto hungry baby milk at 5 weeks and Bronwyn was feeding every 2 hours or so at that point. It was the best thing I could have done!!!”

Fellow MFMer DawnG agrees: “Cameron also went onto hungry baby milk at around 6wks as he was feeding every 2hrs day and night. My health visitor was against it and told me it was perfectly normal for him to be feeding so frequently, but for my own sanity I changed the milk and didn’t regret it one bit.”

Hungry baby formula at night

Many mums choose to use hungry baby formulas to help tackle sleep deprivation when feeding hits the 2-hourly pattern that Jane highlighted.

“There is no reason why a hungry baby formula milk should not be used day and night,” she says.

The key is to ensure they are being fed regularly enough, and are still gaining weight.

Officially, there is no evidence to show that babies sleep longer when given hungry baby formulas, but anecdotal reports show it may be helpful.

MadeForMumer Laura reveals: “Switched Jack to hungry baby Aptamil 4/5wks it changed everything he was so much more content sleeping 12 hours a night from 6 weeks.”

Can hungry baby formula cause tummy trouble?

Colic, reflux, and constipation are all concerns whenever you try your baby on a new feed, but Jane advises not being overly anxious.

“My experience is that constipation does sometimes occur in very young babies on hungry baby milk,” she reveals. However, she notes that she has not come across it causing other tummy problems or colic, but points out that very young babies might be better off on first-stage milk.

However, one MadeForMumer,Lucy, tried her son on hungry baby formula, but wasn’t happy with the effects on his tummy.

“We changed Ben onto hungrier babies milk, but he ended up having nasty colicky tummy ache on it and wasn’t very happy, so we changed him back to the normal formula and just fed a bit more frequently… Eventually we ended up weaning him a bit earlier than usual,” she says.

Can hungry baby formula increase the risk of baby becoming overweight?

According to Jane, unless the baby is given more hungry baby formula milk than they were having of regular baby milk there is no reason why they should become overweight.

In fact, she explains many babies take a smaller quantity of hungry baby formula, as they are satisfied more quickly with it.

However, research published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in March 2014 has found that lower intakes of protein in the first year of a baby’s life can reduce the risk of childhood obesity.

What is the best way to switch to hungry baby milk?

A gradual switchover is recommended, and Jane advises the following timetable:

  • Day 1 – change 1 bottle from first stage to hungry baby formula
  • Day 4 – change the next feed to hungry baby formula, so baby now has 2 bottles of hungry baby milk
  • Day 7 – change another feed to hungry baby formula, if required
  • Day 10 – repeat, if required

“This allows the baby’s digestion system to get used to a different milk gradually,” explains Jane. “I would suggest giving up to the same quantity as the baby was taking of first milk but not to be concerned if they take slightly less.”

Can hungry baby milk be used to top up breastfeeding?

Regular first milk is more similar to breast milk in terms of composition, so a more obvious choice for topping up, but Jane says there is no reason not to do so if the baby tends to be very hungry.

Mixed feeding was the method of choice for one mum, who found it helpful to able to take a break.

“I breastfed my baby, and bottle-fed both expressed milk and formula, It really helped as my husband fed her at night feed and we also gave her hungry baby milk before bed which helped her sleep through the night.”

Can mums switch between hungry baby formula and regular formula?

Chopping and changing is not a good idea, as it can lead to more agitation.

But, if you have tried hungry baby formula, and it hasn’t agreed with your baby, then “no harm will come over going back to regular formula,” reassures Jane.

“It is important not to keep changing as the baby’s system then finds it difficult and baby is likely to be unsettled,” she adds.

Pics: Getty

Read more

About the expert: Dr Philippa Kaye, a mum of 3,  serves as a GP in both NHS and private practise. She attended Downing College, Cambridge, then took medical studies at Guy’s, King’s and St Thomas’s medical schools in London.

She has trained in paediatrics, gynaecology, care of the elderly and acute medicine, psychiatry and general practise.

Dr Philippa has also written a number of books on topics including pregnancy, baby and child health, diabetes in childhood and adolescence and more. She has advised MadeForMums on numerous child health-related topics over the past 4 years. Read Dr Philippa’s full profile

Источник: https://www.madeformums.com/baby/should-i-try-hungry-baby-formula-milk/

Why Is Your Baby Hungry All The Time?

Your top newborn feeding questions answered

It’s a shock to many new parents that just 48 hours after baby is born, you’re back at home and apart from the safe, secure cocoon of expert nurses at the hospital who stood ready to help and guide. Don’t worry—you’ve got this, and we’ve got the answers to the top 3 questions most parents have when it comes to feeding a newborn and knowing when your baby is hungry. In these first weeks after birth, you’re creating your milk supply, so rest when baby rests, and keep her close by so that you can catch her feeding cues.

#1: Is it normal for baby to seem hungry all the time?

So, you’re home after a busy birthing experience and your baby wants to nurse “all the time.” This is a typical and normal response from your newborn; in fact, your baby will likely want to nurse 10-12 times in those first days!

This may seem too frequent to family and friends who aren’t familiar with what to expect with a breastfeeding infant. But rest assured, most healthy newborns feed “on demand”, which means your baby will be nursing about every 2 hours with unlimited time at the breast each time.

#2: How will I know if my baby is hungry or just crying?

Your baby will give you clues to her hunger: She may smack or lick her lips, open and close her mouth, or suck on her tongue, lips, finger or toes. She may also fidget or “root” by turning her head toward your breast—and her food!

Crying is a late sign when it comes to if your baby is hungry. Don’t wait for crying or baby may be too upset to relax and latch on to your breast. If you find yourself in this state with baby, be patient, calm her and offer her your breast until she latches on.

#3: Should baby just keep feeding and feeding?

Sometimes, often in the evenings when you’re more tired, baby will want to feed more frequently, and for longer periods of time. These are called cluster feedings. The best thing is to find a comfortable place to nurse and let the others take care of the house and you. Keep baby close to you with a wrap so that she can feed frequently.

How often and for how long baby feeds is her way of helping you produce milk; it also calms baby and makes her feel secure. She’ll pull off the breast when she’s done nursing. You can always offer her your other breast just in case, but if she’s truly done, start the next feeding with the other breast.

RELATED TOPICS

Busting the Top 10 Myths About Breastfeeding

Breastfeeding Is the Best Option to Feed Your Baby

Recognizing When Your Baby Has Gas

Feeding Baby: The First Year

Don’t forget to check out our Feeding Your Baby and Breastfeeding sections.

AuthorJoanne Goldbort, PhD, MSN, RN

Joanne Goldbort, PhD, MSN, RN, is an assistant professor in the College of Nursing at Michigan State University and an expert nurse adviser to Healthy Mom&Baby.

Related Posts

Источник: https://www.health4mom.org/why-is-your-baby-hungry-all-the-time/
if i m hungry is my baby hungry

5 Replies to “If i m hungry is my baby hungry”

  1. Sir main BBA final year ka student hu mera 5th semester tak ka result aa chuka h jis main 60+ percent h to kya main apply kr sakta hu kaise apply karne h final sem remaining h

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *