apps that deliver food in my area

On the app, enter your location to show you what we've got around you. Search and choose among restaurants, food stores, sweets and bakes. Jiffy is a new app that replaces the supermarket slog. and could serve as a 'dark store' in your area, drop us an email at [email protected] We are Zoom Food! Shropshire's home-grown online food & retail purchase and delivery service. Delivering food and goods to your home or office.

: Apps that deliver food in my area

A luxury view cabins for you
M FUQ X
Apps that deliver food in my area
JP MORGAN CHASE CAR LOAN
Eastern bank hours danvers ma

Apps that deliver food in my area -

Android (Free)​​​​

Uber Remains the Best Food Delivery Choice

After analyzing all the top food delivery services, Uber continues to show why it is the best food delivery app to work for. Being the most popular food ordering app, there are plenty of opportunities to grab deliveries and make a quick buck. Aside from that, it is completely flexible, and you can work any times you wish.

To incentivize working during less competitive and busy times, Uber offers great promotions and occasional bonuses. With Postmates orders coming through the app as well, you can get extra earning opportunities. While other delivery apps can provide a great supplement income, Uber continues to provide the best food delivery app working experience.

What Is the Best Food Delivery App?

We've categorized all the best food delivery apps to show you where to get the best deals, the quickest delivery, and more.

Read Next

ShareTweetEmail

About The Author
Joe Cason (29 Articles Published)

Joe is a former web designer and current entrepreneur and freelance writer. He is passionate about making technology assessable for everyone. When not writing for MakeUseOf, he can be found skateboarding, hiking, and attending graduate school.

More From Joe Cason

Subscribe to our newsletter

Join our newsletter for tech tips, reviews, free ebooks, and exclusive deals!

Click here to subscribe

Источник: https://www.makeuseof.com/best-food-delivery-app-to-work-for/

A home office-based business in Croydon is taking on global brands Just Eat, Deliveroo and UberEats with its own local delivery service.

Paul Sweeney and Andy Szebeni have today launched Croydon Eats, a food ordering app which is looking to take a large, Croydon-shaped bite from the £11billion takeaway market.

Croydon Eats is setting out to serve diners in the borough better and for less than the established delivery service brands.

With its striking red logo feature an aeroplane propellor – referencing the area’s historic international airport – Croydon Eats already has 31 outlets signed up for their service, as they focus on customers and takeaway outlets in the CR0 and CR2 postcodes, as well as Thornton Heath, New Addington and Purley, though outlets just outside who deliver into those postcode areas will also be included.

From today, diners will be able to order via a dedicated Croydon Eats app or website and either have their food delivered by local Croydon Eats riders, the outlet’s own drivers or be able to save the delivery fee and pick up when the order is ready.

Croydon Eats charges of 50p to app users is a fraction of that charged by the big brands.

Plus, their charges to outlets are much lower, too, so the restaurants and takeaways can afford to make offers and discounts via Croydon Eats that they could not make via the international platforms.

“We are able to undercut the majors because our fixed costs are much lower and we are less greedy,” Sweeney said.

“We don’t have shareholders to keep satisfying, stock market fees, expensive TV ads to fund or a network of overpaid sales people.

Hungry for new business: Paul Sweeney (right) and Andy Szebeni of Croydon Eats

“We are local so can easily fix any issues that might arise with the terminals. Plus we know the market because we live here so can help advise on the best marketing strategies.

“We saw in Lockdown 1 how difficult it was for restaurants and how takeaways were being overcharged by the Big 3, so we saw the opportunity for a disruptor to come into the market.

“The big apps don’t care about the local community and we do: 50 per cent of our profits will go back into marketing locally and we will support local charities and employ local people.

“We just want a business that helps support our families.”

Croydon Eats is waiving its £150 set-up fee for outlets who sign up this month, and they supply a handheld terminal free of charge. Its outlets will be offering discounts of at least 10 per cent and as much as 30 per cent off food orders during the launch month.


  • If you have a news story about life in or around Croydon, want to publicise your residents’ association or business, or if you have a local event to promote, please email us with full details at [email protected]
  • Inside Croydon is a member of the Independent Community News Network
  • Inside Croydon works together with the Bureau of Investigative Journalism and BBC London News
  • ROTTEN BOROUGH AWARDS: Croydon was named the country’s rottenest borough in 2020 in the annual round-up of civic cock-ups in Private Eye magazine – the fourth successive year that Inside Croydon has been the source for such award-winning nominations
  • Inside Croydon: 3million page views in 2020. Seen by 1.4million unique visitors
  • Content on this site is also licensed via Ping! News. To access content for copying in full or in part,  please visit https://pingnews.uk/

Like this:

LikeLoading...

About insidecroydon

News, views and analysis about the people of Croydon, their lives and political times in the diverse and most-populated borough in London. Based in Croydon and edited by Steven Downes. To contact us, please email [email protected]

View all posts by insidecroydon →

This entry was posted in Business, Restaurants, South Croydon and tagged Croydon Eats, South Croydon. Bookmark the permalink.

Источник: https://insidecroydon.com/2021/03/03/food-delivery-app-launches-hungry-for-bite-of-11bn-business/

10 Best Food Delivery Service Apps That You Must Try in 2021

Fact: Food delivery service apps are the future.

The days of calling into a restaurant to speak with a rude host are finally over. Whether if it’s constantly being put on hold or having to scream your order through the deafening background noise, ordering food has been and always be a hassle.

Well thankfully, there’s hope, thanks to some amazing on-demand food delivery service apps!

With just a few taps on the screen, we now have access to hundreds or new and delicious restaurants ranging from every cuisine you can think of. And they’re just getting started 🙂

Best Food Delivery Service Apps

Here are the best on-demand food delivery apps that you must download and try today:

1. DoorDash (iOS / Android)

DoorDash Delivery App

Delivery Fee: $5.99 flat fee.

An on-demand restaurant delivery service that delivers breakfast, lunch, and dinner from your favorite restaurants. Best of all, they even deliver alcoholic beverages from restaurants, stores, and breweries.

Coupon: Get a $0 delivery fee on your first order when you use our link.

2. GrubHub (iOS / Android)

GrubHub

Delivery Fee: Varies (fee set by each restaurant)

Get food delivery and restaurant takeout from over 50,000 restaurants in 1,100+ cities. Just choose your desired cuisine and from there you’ll see restaurants and menus from amazing restaurants. Then just with a tap, you can get your food delivered straight to you.

3. Uber Eats (iOS / Android)

Uber Eats

Delivery Fee: $4.99 and up based on distance

A food ordering and delivery service that you can use your Uber account to get great options from nearby restaurants (chain and local).

Coupon: Use the code eats-uberadambryan to get $5 off.

4. Seamless (iOS / Android)

Seamless Delivery App

Delivery Fee: $6

A simple way to order food for delivery or takeout from thousands of places and menus in your neighborhood. Best of all, you can even get access to discounts and deals on some of your delivery favorites.

Coupon: Get $7 off any order of $12 or more when you use the code AFF7.

5. Postmates (iOS / Android)

Postmates

Delivery Fee: $1.99 – $3.99 for Partner Merchants (green check) and $5.99 – $9.99 for all other merchants.

Get food, groceries, and even alcohol delivered to you from over 100,00 retail shops, grocery stores, and restaurants, and more. The coolest part is that they offer Postmates Unlimited which for $9.99 a month, you can get a $0 delivery fee on all orders over $20

Coupon: Use the code FREEFOOD to get $100 in delivery fee credit.

6. goPuff (iOS / Android)

goPuff

Delivery Fee: $1.95 flat rate

Get snacks, drinks, and ice cream along with thousands of other products delivered fast straight to your doorstep.

7. Delivery.com (iOS / Android)

Delivery.com

Delivery Fee: Varies by restaurant.

Find a local favorite and discover new ones with this app and website. And if there’s one thing that separates Delivery.com from the rest, it’s the fact that they deliver food, alcohol, groceries, gifts, and laundry. Yes, laundry. Best of all, you can earn Delivery Points with every purchase and cash them in for free credit and other rewards.

8. Instacart (iOS / Android)

Instacart

Delivery Fee: $5.99 delivery fee or $0 (with a $149 annual membership)

Get thousands of groceries and other essential products from stores you already shop at delivered straight to your door via same-day delivery.

9. Munchery (iOS / Android)

Munchery

Delivery fee: $8.95 membership

Get chilled, chef-crafted meals delivered straight to your door on your schedule. Best of all, these meals are priced so much lower than similar dishes at restaurants. And with every meal purchase, Munchery donates a meal to a person in need. This service is a great combination of both a meal kit delivery service and a food delivery app.

10. Eat 24 (iOS / Android)

Eat 24

Delivery Fee: Varies by restaurant.

Get easy access to thousands of local restaurants and favorites delivered straight to your door. Best of all, they are now powered by GrubHub.

Coupon: Get $10 off your order when you sign up to their newsletter.

Thanks for reading and hopefully you find the best on-demand food deliver service that meets your needs and satisfies your cravings.

Bon appetite.

This post contains affiliate links which means that I will make a small commission if you purchase a product after clicking on any of them, at no extra cost to you. Thank you for your support.

SHARE THIS

Best Food Delivery Service Apps
Источник: https://urbantastebud.com/best-food-delivery-service-apps/
Android (Free)

2. Grubhub

Image Gallery (2 Images)

Expand

Expand

If your city has Grubhub and you want a more stable work schedule, Grubhub is a great choice. It also has a stable schedule and pays around $12 per hour.

Related: How Does Grubhub Work for Customers, Drivers, and Restaurants?

Grubhub has a scheduling system where you claim certain shifts for making deliveries. On one hand, this is great as you aren’t facing as much competition in your local area. On the other hand, you’ll need to make sure you show up for your shifts and work the entire shift.

When working for another food delivery service, like Uber Eats, you can work anytime you want without having to worry about schedules. In contrast, Grubhub’s scheduling system is similar to that of a traditional job, where you log into a calendar and claim a date and time you want and your manager will either approve or deny your request.

Download: Grubhub for iOS

DOWNLOAD
THE APP

Add the ZOOM to your ordering by downloading our speedy App.

Mobile AppMobile App

DRIVERS & RIDERS
WANTED

We are always looking for new drivers and riders to at to our team. We have part time & full time jobs available, with owner-driver top up insurance available with Zego.

‘Deliver in your own car to your own schedule.‘

So if you’re interested in joining a great team with the best rates of pay in your area, go to
www.zoom1hr.co.uk/jointheteam to apply

Did you know we have a licence to sell and deliver alcohol? Search Zoom Drinks and place your order.

Did you know we sell delicious treats and everyones favourite Pick ‘n’ Mix!
Search Zoom Sweets!

INTERESTED IN SELLING AND DELIVERING YOUR PRODUCTS THROUGH ZOOM?

If you have a product or service that could be sold and delivered through Zoom, why not get in touch today for a chat!

We deliver more than just food, and would love to discuss your requirements soon. Contact us on 01743 290335 or visit www.zoom1hr.co.uk/letsdeliver

Источник: https://www.zoom-food.co.uk/

Apps that deliver food in my area -

Android (Free)

3. DoorDash

Image Gallery (2 Images)

Expand

Expand

DoorDash is an incredibly popular delivery app available in most major cities across several countries. With this many users, you are sure to get plenty of orders. Scheduling-wise, DoorDash is a mix between Uber Eats and Grubhub. You can sign in and start delivering straight away or you can schedule time for later. This is great for those who want the best of both worlds.

Pay is the same as any other delivery app.

Related: Pro Tips to Earn More as a DoorDash Driver

Compared to the previous apps, there might not be enough orders in smaller metropolitan areas, as Uber Eats tends to dominate those markets. However, DoorDash allows you to get started at age 18 as opposed to 19. There are also no car requirements, and you can still use a bike or a scooter.

Download: DoorDash for iOS

Best food delivery apps UK: takeaway at the touch of a button

RSS

TechRadar is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more

By Henry St Leger last updated

Why shop for food, when someone can deliver it for you?

Thinking of getting a takeaway? There’s an app for that – and there are a good few avenues for food delivery when you’re sick at home, painfully hungover, or just trying to limit the amount of time you spend out in public with the masses.

While the apps may be somewhat new – all of them have appeared within the past few years – food delivery obviously isn’t. Plenty of restaurants and takeaways have delivery services, meaning they take their meals and courses right to your door instead of making you traipse through your local town or city to pick it up yourself.

Just like the first lockdown, we relied heavily on Just Eat, Deliveroo, Uber Eats, Dominos, Pizza Hut and so much more to help us through such an unprecedented time.

Thankfully, as we enter a second coronavirus-imposed lockdown, we can once again rely on these services to keep us full for a reasonable price.

The rise of smartphone apps has also made it possible for entities like Deliveroo or JustEat to mobilize the menus of countless restaurants, food spots, and cafes with one dedicated courier service.

So, if you’re looking for a takeaway app that only needs you to travel as far as you can scroll, here’s our guide to the best options out there.

1. Deliveroo

iOS / Android

Deliveroo is to takeaways what Netflix is to TV streaming: it’s probably your first port of call. Founded in 2013, it’s been serving stomachs in the UK, Europe, Australia, and parts of UAE and South East Asia for several years now, and boasts a huge number of restaurants and cuisines, whether you’re craving burgers, pizzas, ramen, sushi, Italian, Thai, or Indian nourishment. You can even order breakfast foods.

The app is well laid out, with clear categories for cuisines, and simple restaurant pages that run you through the food available, user ratings, expected delivery time to your location, and hygiene ratings (if you want to know, that is).

Some chains – such as Wagamama and Pizza Pilgrims – only use Deliveroo, rather than any of the other apps in this guide. Deliveroo also lets you order groceries and the like from supermarkets and off-licenses in the UK, making it easier than ever to never leave your home.

In these trying times of COVID-19, Deliveroo has also introduced a contact-free delivery option, which you can choose at checkout – meaning your driver will knock, leave the delivery at the door, and wait nearby to ensure you’ve received it safely. Whether you’re ill yourself or worried about contamination from drivers bustling out and about, it should help to put you at ease.

Most of the options, however, will slap you with a heft delivery charge unless you shell out for the Deliveroo Plus experience which offers free delivery for a monthly cost.

2. Just Eat

iOS / Android

JustEat delivers from almost twice as many restaurants as Deliveroo, with significantly wider coverage than its competitors. It’s been in the market for the longest, to be fair, having spread from its origins in Denmark to over 13 countries, with a major presence in the UK. It now has its own courier service too, rather than merely acting as a marketplace for takeaway spots with their own drivers, as it had before.

The JustEat app arranges things a little differently, with sections for restaurants with no minimum order (if you’re just ordering in for yourself), those with free delivery, or best-known chains. The layout is less slick than Deliveroo’s, and you can’t track your food in the way you would in the Deliveroo app either, meaning it lags behind as a user experience – although JustEat’s larger coverage of the UK means it may be a better port of call for those of you outside London or other major cities.

JustEat is notably better than Deliveroo for its offering of local restaurants you might otherwise skip. For local businesses, it's excellent exposure and, who knows, you might even find you had the best pizza in the UK down the road this whole time.

3. UberEats

iOS / Android

Fresh from the United States, the Uber-spinoff service, UberEats, delivers food and takeaways to your door in much the same way as Deliveroo or JustEat.

UberEats isn’t quite as prominent in the UK, and does require a standalone app, rather than being part of the main Uber rideshare app – though your account information is pulled over if you have the main app already, making it a pretty convenient setup.

If you're looking for a food order at a discount, chances are you'll get one through Uber Eats. The services frequently send out texts or emails (based on your preference) offering you free delivery, percentages off, or even a flat £5 off your order.

The app prefers to lead with special offers and then lists restaurants in your area, rather than allowing you to search via particular cuisines (which would be the most intuitive option). There is, however, a handy sorting tool for listing options via price, or with regard to specific dietary restrictions – vegetarian, vegan, gluten-free, or halal. 

You can also ask your courier to wait in the car for you to pick up the food, or come directly to your door. And – in case you were worried – you won’t be sharing rides with a curry or pile of pizzas, as Uber’s person-cabs and food couriers work separately.

Henry is TechRadar's News & Features Editor, covering the stories of the day with verve, moxie, and aplomb. He's spent the past three years reporting on TVs, projectors and smart speakers as well as gaming and VR – including a stint as the website's Home Cinema Editor – and has been interviewed live on both BBC World News and Channel News Asia, discussing the future of transport and 4K resolution televisions respectively. As a graduate of English Literature and persistent theatre enthusiast, he'll usually be found forcing Shakespeare puns into his technology articles, which he thinks is what the Bard would have wanted. Bylines include Edge, T3, and Little White Lies.

Источник: https://www.techradar.com/uk/best/best-food-delivery-service-in-the-us-uber-eats-vs-grubhub-vs-doordash

‘They’re stealing our customers and we’ve had enough’: is Deliveroo killing restaurant culture?

Shukran Best Kebab – the finest Turkish restaurant in the Seven Sisters area of north London, according to some people (although it is surrounded by fierce rivals to the throne) – joined Deliveroo two years ago, and back then it seemed like a no-brainer. “Life as a small, independent restaurant is hard and the profit margins are slim,” says Hüseyin Kurt, Shukran’s owner. “We wanted more customers and money coming in and Deliveroo seemed to offer that. I didn’t think there was a downside.” Within a few days of signing a contract with the company, a shiny new tablet computer arrived on which orders placed via Deliveroo appeared out of the ether with a satisfying ping.

The sense that something was wrong dawned gradually. Kurt, a gregarious, bearded man in his early 40s, who left his central Anatolian home town in 1995 and used his love of food to build a new life in the UK, ran the numbers: with Deliveroo’s commission amounting to 35% plus VAT on every order, he was forced to increase his prices to avoid losing money on each sale. It meant anyone buying his huge adana kofte or mixed shish kebabs through the Deliveroo app was in effect paying three surcharges for the convenience, as Deliveroo was also charging them a delivery and service fee. That went down badly with previously loyal customers who were presented with a vast number of often heavily discounted competitors when using the app.

The more Kurt thought about it, the more he wondered what his restaurant was supposed to be gaining from this arrangement. When things went awry, such as a delivery driver not turning up or someone complaining about a missing item, he could be hit with a financial penalty, and it was almost impossible to reach a human being at Deliveroo to resolve it. And, as time went by, Deliveroo was learning more and more about his clientele, while his customers grew ever more remote from him. “It just felt like Deliveroo were taking in money and information from every angle, while other people – us at the restaurant, the drivers who came to pick up the orders – did all the work,” he says.

That was when strange rumours first began swirling around the local restaurant scene. Word was that Deliveroo had started building its own kitchens on a piece of wasteland up the road, just the other side of Hornsey railway line; the newly installed units had no windows, people said, and a security guard was posted on the door. Kurt couldn’t understand it. “What do you think is going on in there?” he asked fellow restaurateurs. “What do Deliveroo know about cooking?”

If you live in one of the 150 British towns and cities now served by Deliveroo, the firm’s turquoise logo probably feels ubiquitous these days: plastered on stickers inside takeaway windows, bobbing on the backs of cyclists and motorbike riders, flashing across television sets during the evening news. Deliveroo’s much-hyped stock market flotation last month dominated headlines, as did the rapid tumble in its share price after major institutional investors opted to steer clear. Many cited concerns about the company’s corporate governance and potential legal challenges from its 50,000 delivery workers, who are currently classed as self-employed contractors rather than salaried employees.

The Bureau of Investigative Journalism recently claimed that a significant proportion of the riders it sampled earn below the minimum wage, including some who are paid as little as £2 an hour; Deliveroo claims that riders earn £13 an hour on average at the busiest times (although this does not take into account periods in which few or no orders come through) and that the fees paid to riders are increasing year on year.

Amid these controversies, one important fact about Deliveroo has passed relatively unnoticed: the company that the chancellor, Rishi Sunak, calls a “true British tech success story” has never turned a profit – even during the Covid lockdowns. It’s hard to imagine a more fortuitous set of circumstances for Deliveroo’s business model than the pandemic, which has led to most people spending several months in effect under house arrest while pubs and dine-in restaurants shut their doors. But despite seeing a huge surge in demand (total orders for the first quarter of 2021 were more than double those for the same period last year), the firm ended up cutting a quarter of its staff jobs in 2020 and relied upon a big cash injection from Amazon to stave off ruin; this year, it is on course to make a loss of almost £300m. And yet financial markets still value the firm at nearly £5bn.

“In a world where consumers want more, better and faster, we think Deliveroo is doing a good job,” concluded a report by the private investment bank Berenberg earlier this month. Plenty of people who make money from money are betting that Deliveroo is on a long-term path to profitability, even if its current set-up pushes the company further into the red with every order. “We truly believe we are still getting started,” declared Deliveroo’s founder, Will Shu, in a letter to prospective shareholders. “Join us on the journey.” But what is that journey’s ultimate destination? And what will the implications be – for the way we eat, the livelihoods of those who feed us and the future of our neighbourhoods – once we arrive?


West Green Road, home of Shukran Best Kebab, runs for more than a mile through north-east London – from Ducketts Common in the west to Tottenham’s Latin Village market in the east. Step left or right out of Kurt’s doorway and you’ll find yourself immersed in one of the most dense and diverse independent restaurant scenes in the capital. Nigerian diners rub up against Korean fast-food joints; Polish cafes dovetail with Ghanaian bakeries, Caribbean takeaways and Ugandan charity kitchens. Nearly all of them are family-run or owned by just one or two individuals living locally.

“The whole planet is here,” says João Castro, owner of Bom Pecado, a Portuguese restaurant whose name means “Good Sin”, which is famed for its hearty stews and pastel de nata pastries. Castro says that the road’s fusion of culinary cultures lends itself to serendipitous interactions. “It’s a special, social place,” he says. “People end up sitting down next to strangers and discovering who they are.”

Before most of us walked around with smartphones in our pockets, the West Green Road restaurants that offered a takeaway service would handle deliveries themselves. In the mid-2000s, Just Eat, today the biggest player by far in the UK’s food delivery market, began aggregating local takeaway options, allowing customers to browse a range of nearby meal choices on a single website, rather than having to wrestle with a bulging folder of paper menus that had been stuffed through the letterbox. But deliveries were still largely managed in-house, at least until 2013, when Deliveroo kicked off a new generation of highly competitive “food delivery platforms” that provided restaurants with a full toolkit of delivery logistics – from order terminals to a network of drivers on demand. The days of grainy cinema adverts for the local curry house were over; beforelong, Snoop Dogg was promoting your nearest chicken balti on prime-time TV.

At first, many outlets in West Green Road shunned Deliveroo and its rival Uber Eats. For one thing, Deliveroo was oriented towards the wealthier end of the market – “the Waitrose of restaurants, whereas around here we are more Tesco or Aldi”, one Tottenham restaurant owner says. For another, many were happy to concentrate on eat-in clients, only sending meals out in a taxi if needed. But the pandemic changed everything: overnight, access to reliable delivery infrastructure and a ready pool of delivery customers went from being a niche luxury to a vital survival mechanism. Nearly every food outlet in the area is now signed up to the platform, including several off-licences and grocers, a major new target for the company in its quest for perpetual growth. “Deliveroo is here to deliver for restaurants who want to carry on offering their amazing food to families at home during this difficult time,” said Shu, as the country’s first lockdown came into force.

Talk to restaurateurs about their experiences with Deliveroo over the past year, though, and a more complex picture emerges. The Observer has spoken to several cafe- and restaurant-owners in the neighbourhood and, with one exception, who is broadly neutral, all of them are critical of the company. Everybody insists that the commission levels are far too high and that local independents are paying over the odds compared with national chains and prestige brands. There is anger too that restaurants are at the mercy of Deliveroo’s way of ranking them within the app, with little transparency over why some outlets are at the top and others become lost to obscurity down below.

“They woo you with honeyed words and push users towards you at the beginning, so it seems like it’s working out, then you drop like a stone,” claims one. “They’re stealing our customers and we’ve had enough – we’ve told them to come and remove their machines,” says another, referring to the fact that when a restaurant joins the platform it can bring with it a host of devoted fans who Deliveroo can market to other restaurants. “It’s robbery, pure and simple.”

None of the interviewees begrudge Deliveroo the right to charge restaurants for the service it is providing. Their grievances revolve around the fact that by assuming the role of market gatekeeper, the company has a responsibility to play fairly, and that in this regard it is falling short. Speculation abounds that favoured restaurant names, of the type rarely to be found in this part of the city, are able to cut better deals than smaller outlets that are rooted in their communities but have no economic clout when it comes to negotiating fees. Many refer to the fact that unlike their own firms, Deliveroo pays no UK corporation tax, and the restaurant owners suspect the net effect of the company’s operations is that money flows out of a poor neighbourhood – Tottenham’s unemployment rate is currently the fastest growing in the country and its level of child poverty is almost double the national average – and into the pockets of far-flung global investors.

But despite these complaints, almost every restaurant owner says they have no choice but to remain on the platform because that is where the customers now are. Nearly all requested anonymity in this article for fear that speaking out against Deliveroo could see them relegated down the app’s search rankings. The Observer requested an interview with a representative of Deliveroo to discuss criticisms made by its restaurant partners but was told that no one was available.

In a statement, the company said that it was proud to work with more than 50,000 riders and 46,000 restaurant partners in the UK and that it had helped the latter boost their growth during the pandemic. “They are at the heart of our business and their wellbeing and success is our number one priority,” it said. “We have also introduced a wide range of support measures to help our community, from the £16m Rider thank-you fund to the new £50m community fund, which will directly support riders and restaurants partners.”

Underlying many of the restaurants’ concerns is something more intangible: a fear that as many of us become accustomed to selecting lunch or dinner through a smartphone, our relationship to food itself, and the social context that surrounds it, is shifting. Kurt comes from the Kayseri region of Turkey, as do the owners of several ocakbaşı or “grill” restaurants in the area; to him, the local takeaway scene is a rich map of cultural reference points – something intimately bound up with physical geography, in the land from which his cuisine emerged and the places in which it is now cooked here. For customers, eating in small restaurants provides some exposure to that reality; by contrast, ordering a meal through a food delivery platform, where identical-looking options are likely to be sorted by the size of the discounts being offered or how fast a third-party motorbike rider can deliver to you, is an abstract process.

“The interface of an app like Deliveroo appears to be completely flat, even though it’s built on data that is generated in real places, by real people,” says Adam Badger, an academic at Royal Holloway, University of London, who specialises in this subject and has also worked as a courier. “Restaurants become data entries; delivery riders are just a loading bar travelling from left to right across a screen.” Like all seemingly flat surfaces though, Deliveroo’s hard edges are out there – you just have to know where to look.


The Deliveroo Editions site at Cranford Way, north London, sits at the back of an electricity substation, sandwiched between a boxing gym on one side and some overgrown scrub on the other. Despite the rumble of motorcycle engines making their way to and from the entrance, and the beeps of lorries reversing out of the adjacent self-storage and warehouse complex, it feels eerily quiet. You could sit here for hours and almost never hear a human voice.

Like most “dark kitchens”, it occupies the edge lands: spaces that are neither one thing nor another, urban offcuts that are easily overlooked. Other Deliveroo Editions sites in the UK can be found at the back of industrial estates or below traffic flyovers. They typically consist of up to 16 metal boxes roughly the size of shipping containers, packed on to a patch of asphalt with generators humming in between. Compared with West Green Road, Cranford Way feels like a different universe and yet it’s barely half a mile from one end of the street. From here, offerings from Pizza Express, Shake Shack and “Cluckleberry Finn Fried Chicken” – a delivery-only outfit that you won’t find anywhere outside Deliveroo’s app – are pumped out into the city. Thousands of people live in the Deliveroo catchment area for Shukran Best Kebab. Most of them are now, unknowingly, also in the catchment area for Deliveroo Editions.

“Dark kitchens” are places where meals are prepared entirely for delivery. They have been used for decades in areas such as catering for mass events, but the idea of gearing them towards home takeaways is relatively recent. It’s a leap that has only been made possible by the rise of food delivery platforms, and the global leader of the concept is Deliveroo, which opened its first dark kitchen in London in 2016. Today, the company boasts 250 in eight countries, each of them home to a fluid array of tenants, including international chain restaurants, tentative startups and virtual brands, some of which might “exist” on the app for just a few weeks.

To many, the notion of a whole host of different cuisines emerging from the same kitchen – with a chef simultaneously preparing a pizza on one work surface and a Sichuan hot pot on another – feels unsettling, but it reflects the logic of the abstracted digital marketplace; the New Yorker recently described dark kitchens as “the culinary equivalent of a multicolour retractable pen”. To make a success of the operation you need to know what colour to push and that’s where Deliveroo’s vast stores of data come to the fore. “Using our own technology, we can identify specific local cuisines missing in an area, identify customer demand for that missing cuisine and handpick brands that are most likely to appeal to customers in that area,” Deliveroo’s former property acquisitions manager, Patrick Weiss, speaking in 2017,has said.

As the firm’s prospectus for its flotation reveals, Editions lie at the heart of Deliveroo’s vision of the future and its plan to win the delivery-app wars. “With unparalleled global expertise, we are uniquely positioned to scale this concept,” the company claims, and many investors agree. “Deliveroo already has a great database of consumer preferences,” says Ioannis Pontikis, an equity analyst for the financial services firm Morningstar. “And once you’ve set up a dark kitchen, it’s very easy to trial new brand ideas, new food concepts, new marketing and promotions.” Pontikis points out that dark kitchens don’t only have an edge over bricks-and-mortar restaurants when it comes to generating demand: they also benefit from better unit economics – ie a lower cost for each meal produced.

Established restaurants in West Green Road may have spent years building up fixed infrastructure, a trusted reputation and a place for themselves in the area. But when it comes to being able to adaptively predict, produce, advertise and cheaply deliver whatever particular meals are wanted in nearby postcodes at any particular moment – burgers and wings on a Saturday afternoon during an England football game, for example, or comforting bowls of pasta on a rainy weekday evening – Cranford Way blows them all out of the water.

For both existing restaurants and budding restaurateurs, there are some advantages to dark kitchens. In towns bedevilled by crippling rents, setting up shop inside one of the Deliveroo Editions sites rather than taking out an expensive and inflexible lease in the high street is a relatively cheap way of testing demand. Some of Britain’s most innovative food outlets began life as pop-up cafes or mobile trailers at festivals; for many, dark kitchens are the next step in bringing their food to a wider audience. And in the context of the pandemic, during which nearly every restaurant essentially became a dark kitchen at some point, delivery-only production sites have arguably been a lifeline.

Rosa’sThai Cafe, a restaurant that started out as a husband-and-wife operation, and has since grown into a small chain of 24 UK outlets, opened four dark kitchens in the Covid era, including one at Cranford Way. Its chief executive, Gavin Adair, believes that the concept can help to lower entry barriers for established and fledgling restaurants alike and should not be seen solely as a threat to existing businesses. “You don’t have a long-term commitment, which is one of the things that has tripped up some businesses that have tried to grow in the past,” he says. “These kitchens may end up helping to prove there’s enough interest in our product in a particular neighbourhood for us to eventually open up a full restaurant there. Fundamentally, we’re very clear that we’re a restaurant business with an ancillary delivery operation. It’s not an either/or.”

Deliveroo likewise insists that the Editions model is designed to support existing restaurant sites in the high street, not replace those premises, and says that its Editions kitchens have saved some restaurants from going under, enabled local brands to expand nationally and helped small outfits grow into established names.

But ever-more expansive restaurant choice for consumers is not necessarily good news if the playing field isn’t level. Deliveroo refuses to divulge the commission rates it charges different restaurant partners, yet Adair acknowledges that when it comes to the economics of app-based delivery, his company is in a fortunate position because of its “strong relationship” with the platform; few of the restaurants in West Green Road can say the same. And a fleet-footed future of transitory, disposable virtual brands and site-hopping around industrial parks does not hold much promise if your restaurant is woven into the fabric of a real place, especially if the data being used to construct that future has been gleaned from the hard graft of businesses like yours. Pontikis is convinced that, coronavirus lockdowns aside, there will always be a healthy demand for some eat-in restaurants, particularly those at the higher end of the market. But he says smaller family-run takeaways that have traditionally depended upon local awareness and accessibility might find it harder to distinguish themselves within a market wholly geared towards convenience. Their long-term fate, he says remains “the million-dollar question”.

Kurt insists that if dark kitchens ever begin offering meals that directly rival his own, he will rip the Deliveroo sticker from his window and throw it in the bin. But he may already be too late. Deliveroo is no longer the only player in the dark kitchen market: Foodstars, recently bought out by the former Uber boss Travis Kalanick, already operates just east of Shukran Best Kebab, on the edge of a waste-processing plant; last year, Karma Kitchen, which has just landed £250m of new investment, opened its own delivery-only kitchen unit less than two miles north.

In March, Reef, an American company that buys up car parks with a view to transforming them into “hubs for the on-demand economy” – offering a space to everything from vertical farming units to pop-up parcel sorting depots and, of course, dark kitchens – announced it was working with the owners of Wood Green shopping centre, 10 minutes by motorbike from Kurt’s front door. In Miami, Reef is experimenting with the use of robots to deliver meals, a move that some analysts believe Deliveroo is bound to copy in the years to come. In China – where the nexus between food delivery platforms and dark kitchens is more advanced, and the market has been sewn up by two of the country’s biggest tech giants, Alibaba and Tencent – data and automation have combined to enable the creation of specialist production sites engineered to churn out a single popular dish without any human involvement at all. Most people currently think of Deliveroo as an app that connects local restaurants with delivery drivers. But standing in West Green Road, with dark kitchens rapidly closing in, it’s hard not to suspect that the ultimate aim of the venture-capitalist subsidised food tech industry might be to do away with both.


In the meantime, however, Deliveroo still has to contend with real humans and restaurants, many of which are increasingly unafraid to kick up a fuss. Earlier this month, striking Deliveroo riders in central London protested for a living wage on the day of the firm’s stock market launch. On arrival at Deliveroo’s headquarters, where City of London police officers guarded the doors, the president of the Independent Workers of Great Britain trade union, which represents some of the delivery workers, addressed the crowd. “While the pandemic has been going on and you’ve been putting your lives and your families’ lives at risk to deliver food,” Alex Marshall yelled through a megaphone, “this company has been getting richer and richer, even as your own pay and conditions have worsened!” More strikes, protests and legal challenges from riders are being promised. According to Deliveroo, internal polling indicates that 89% of riders are satisfied or very satisfied with the status quo and that there is “overwhelming” support for the company and its flexible labour model.

That has not prevented the emergence in recent years of an array of grassroots alternatives to the leading food delivery platforms – from regional courier collectives to online services that allow small restaurants to market delivery options directly to customers, without the use of Just Eat, Uber Eats or Deliveroo. One Deliveroo rider is helping to build an ethical food delivery platform that will shortly be launched in north London, promising a guaranteed living wage for drivers, zero-emissions vehicles and a refusal to work with large chains or dark kitchens; now, some restaurant owners are getting in on the act as well. Henal Chotai, proprietor of Red Cup Cafe in Harrow, north-west London, with his wife, Reena, is co-developing an eco-friendly delivery service called FoodeBikes; he believes that as the UK emerges from lockdown, public appetite for platforms that do a better job of supporting independent restaurants is growing fast.

“Independent restaurants in this country are on their knees right now, but at the same time the value of what we bring to society – the importance of real, human hospitality, the places where you go and form happy memories – has been magnified,” Chotai says. “We’re battered and bruised, but we’re ready to fight for our futures. So I beg everyone, when you can: go out and visit your local small restaurant, find a way of buying from them directly. We’ve been here for our local communities and we need our local communities to help us – and the country at large – get back on our feet.”

Other tech giants – Uber for taxis, Airbnb for holiday homes – have eventually come up against public and regulatory backlashes, although in many cases that has done little to clip their wings. In the wake of a recent court ruling requiring Uber to reclassify its drivers as workers rather than independent contractors, Deliveroo may soon be heading in the same direction. In the end, however, neither minor legislative tweaks nor individual consumer choices alone will be enough to turn the tide, unless we decide as a society that the food delivery platform model as it’s currently conceived will damage things we care about, such as local restaurants or workers’ rights.

Badger argues that Deliveroo is a product of the economic and political systems that sustain it; if we want it to function differently, then we have to start there. “This is a company that reflects and replicates the structures of monopolistic venture capital,” he says. “For decades, we had a takeaways market that wasn’t monopolistic – it was the opposite, it was fragmented and local. Then speculative financial interests came in to change that. Yes, there are existing regulations, particularly on labour rights, which Deliveroo should be made to adhere to, and new ones that should be brought in. But more broadly, if we want Deliveroo to have better priorities then we all have to fight for a better society. Deliveroo are not the problem on their own.”

Deliveroo is continuing to expand: the company plans to set up in 100 more British towns this year and hopes to eventually become the first thing that any of us think about whenever we think about food. “Our mission is to be the definitive online food company,” the firm announced recently. “The way we think about it is simple: there are 21 meal occasions in a week – breakfast, lunch and dinner, seven days a week. Right now, less than one of those 21 transactions takes place online. We are working to change that.”

In one sense, the company is right: transformations in how we eat are inevitable. The history of the takeaway has been evolving ever since the Roman empire served on-the-go lentils in thermopoliaand Aztec market vendors flogged tamales; it would be a mistake to romanticise a culinary past in which various forms of exploitation have been omnipresent. But it is worth remembering that every reconfiguration of the way we live and the resources we rely on, including restaurants, meals and the people who produce and deliver them, involves a reconfiguration of power, creating winners and losers. Global investors are gambling billions on an app-driven, dark kitchen-dominated future, and it’s clear who will emerge triumphant if that future materialises.

“We, this street, everyone round here … we’ve helped make Deliveroo rich,” Kurt says. “But is what’s good for them going to be good for us?” The answer to that question – for Shukran Best Kebab and thousands of other small restaurants like it – is in our hands.

This article was amended on 27 April 2021 to clarify that Patrick Weiss is Deliveroo’s former property acquisitions manager.

Источник: https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2021/apr/25/deliveroo-tech-delivery-restaurant-service-dark-kitchens

We deliver groceries in minutes

Over 1,500 everyday 

products

Shop for snacks, drinks, fresh produce and more from the brands you know and love.

Delivery in minutes

day or night

No need to book a slot — we deliver in minutes from early morning until late at night.

Absolutely 

no substitutions

We have a real-time inventory, so what you order is what you get. Exactly how it should be.

Minutes matter

Life is hectic. We deliver groceries in minutes so that you can spend more time doing the things you love.

Plenty to choose from

Want or need something? We’ve got a wide range of everyday products from the brands you love.

Delivery when you want it

We deliver from morning until late at night. Check the app to see if we deliver to you!

Deals and promotions

Get exclusive offers on your favourite products and be delighted with the price.

Rate your experience

Give us a star rating and add a comment too. We love hearing what you think is good and what we could do better.

Ready to order?

Get your grocery shopping delivered in minutes. Download Getir.

Источник: https://getir.uk/
Android (Free)​​​​

Uber Remains the Best Food Delivery Choice

After analyzing all the top food delivery services, Uber continues to show why it is the best food delivery app to work for. Being the most popular food ordering app, there are plenty of opportunities to grab deliveries and make a quick buck. Aside from that, it is completely flexible, and you can work any times you wish.

To incentivize working during less competitive and busy times, Uber offers great promotions and occasional bonuses. With Postmates orders coming through the app as well, you can get extra earning opportunities. While other delivery apps can provide a great supplement income, Uber continues to provide the best food delivery app working experience.

What Is the Best Food Delivery App?

We've categorized all the best food delivery apps to show you where to get the best deals, the quickest delivery, and more.

Read Next

ShareTweetEmail

About The Author
Joe Cason (29 Articles Published)

Joe is a former web designer and current entrepreneur and freelance writer. He is passionate about making technology assessable for everyone. When not writing for MakeUseOf, he can be found skateboarding, hiking, and attending graduate school.

More From Joe Cason

Subscribe to our newsletter

Join our newsletter for tech tips, reviews, free ebooks, and exclusive deals!

Click here to subscribe

Источник: https://www.makeuseof.com/best-food-delivery-app-to-work-for/

A home office-based business in Croydon is taking on global brands Just Eat, Deliveroo and UberEats with its own local delivery service.

Paul Sweeney and Andy Szebeni have today launched Croydon Eats, a food ordering app which is looking to take a large, Croydon-shaped bite from the £11billion takeaway market.

Croydon Eats is setting out to serve diners in the borough better and for less than the established delivery service brands.

With its striking red logo feature an aeroplane propellor – referencing the area’s historic international airport – Croydon Eats already has 31 outlets signed up for their service, as they focus on customers and takeaway outlets in the CR0 and CR2 postcodes, as well as Thornton Heath, New Addington and Purley, though outlets just outside who deliver into those postcode areas will also be included.

From today, diners will apps that deliver food in my area able to order via a dedicated Croydon Eats app or website and either have their food apps that deliver food in my area by local Croydon Eats riders, the outlet’s own drivers or be able to save the delivery fee and pick up when the order is ready.

Croydon Eats charges of 50p to app users is a fraction of that charged by the big brands.

Plus, their charges to outlets are much lower, too, so the restaurants and takeaways can afford to make offers and discounts via Croydon Eats that they could not make via the international platforms.

“We are able to undercut the majors because our fixed costs are much lower and we are less greedy,” Sweeney said.

“We don’t have shareholders to keep satisfying, stock market fees, expensive TV ads to fund or a network of overpaid sales people.

Hungry for new business: Paul Sweeney (right) and Andy Szebeni of Croydon Eats

“We are local so can easily fix any issues that might arise with the terminals. Plus we know the market because we live here so can help advise on the best marketing strategies.

“We saw in Lockdown 1 how difficult it was for restaurants and how takeaways were being overcharged by the Big 3, so we saw the opportunity for a disruptor to come into the market.

“The big apps don’t care about the local community and we do: 50 per cent of our profits will go back into marketing locally and we will support local charities and employ local people.

“We just want a business that helps support our families.”

Croydon Eats is waiving its £150 set-up fee for outlets who sign up this month, and they supply a handheld terminal free of charge. Its outlets will be offering discounts of at least 10 per cent and as much as 30 per cent off food orders during the launch month.


  • If you have a news story about life in or around Croydon, want to publicise your residents’ association or business, or if you have a local event to promote, please email us with full details at [email protected]
  • Inside Croydon is a member of the Independent Community News Network
  • Inside Croydon works together with the Bureau of Investigative Journalism and BBC London News
  • ROTTEN BOROUGH AWARDS: Croydon was named the country’s rottenest borough in 2020 in the annual round-up of civic cock-ups in Private Eye magazine – the fourth successive year that Inside Croydon has been the source for such award-winning nominations
  • Inside Croydon: 3million page views in 2020. Seen by 1.4million unique visitors
  • Content on this apps that deliver food in my area is also licensed via Ping! News. To access content for copying in full or in part,  please visit https://pingnews.uk/

Like this:

LikeLoading.

About insidecroydon

News, views and analysis about the people of Croydon, their lives and political times in the diverse and most-populated borough in London. Based in Croydon and edited by Steven Downes. To contact us, please email [email protected]

View all posts by insidecroydon →

This entry was posted in Business, Restaurants, South Croydon and tagged Croydon Eats, South Croydon. Bookmark the permalink.

Источник: https://insidecroydon.com/2021/03/03/food-delivery-app-launches-hungry-for-bite-of-11bn-business/
Android (Free)

4. Postmates

Image Gallery (2 Images)

Expand

Expand

Postmates continues to be one of the most popular delivery services in larger metropolitan areas. However, you may have noticed it doesn’t offer a stand-alone delivery driver app anymore. Originally, you had to complete training with a certified Postmates driver to become one yourself. This turned a lot of people away from this delivery job, as it felt unnecessary to some experienced drivers and was a nuisance, as they just wanted to make their deliveries alone.

Related: Which Food Delivery Apps Pay the Most? The Top Choices

Recently, Postmates was purchased by Uber, and delivering with Postmates just means you need to use the Uber Driver app. If you’ve delivered with Uber before, you might have noticed that sometimes you get asked to deliver Postmates orders. Depending on where you deliver, you could get a large number of these orders when on an Uber run. Postmates orders pay more, though, as the app charges a larger delivery fee to the customer.

Download: Uber Driver for iOS

‘They’re stealing our customers and we’ve had enough’: is Deliveroo killing restaurant culture?

Shukran Best Kebab – the finest Turkish restaurant in the Seven Sisters area of north London, according to some people (although it is surrounded by fierce rivals to the throne) – joined Deliveroo two years ago, and back then it seemed like a no-brainer. “Life as a small, independent restaurant is hard and the profit margins are slim,” says Hüseyin Kurt, Shukran’s owner. “We wanted more customers and money coming in and Deliveroo seemed to offer that. I didn’t think there was a downside.” Within a few days of signing a contract with the company, a shiny new tablet computer arrived on which orders placed via Deliveroo appeared out of the ether with a satisfying ping.

The sense that something was wrong dawned gradually. Kurt, a gregarious, bearded man in his early 40s, who left his central Anatolian home town in 1995 and used his love of food to build a new life in the UK, ran the numbers: with Deliveroo’s commission amounting to 35% plus VAT on every order, he was forced to increase his prices to avoid losing money on each sale. It meant anyone buying his huge adana kofte or mixed shish kebabs through the Deliveroo app was in effect paying three surcharges for the convenience, as Deliveroo was also charging them a delivery and service fee. That went down badly with previously loyal customers who were presented with a vast number of often heavily discounted competitors when using the app.

The more Kurt thought about it, the more he wondered what his restaurant was supposed to be gaining from this arrangement. When things went awry, such as a delivery driver not turning up or someone complaining about a missing item, he could be hit with a financial penalty, and it was almost impossible to reach a human being at Deliveroo to resolve it. And, as time went by, Deliveroo was learning more and more about his clientele, while his customers grew ever more remote from him. “It just felt like Deliveroo were taking in money and information from every angle, while other people – us at the restaurant, the drivers who came to pick up the orders – did all the work,” he says.

That was new restaurants in mankato strange rumours first began swirling around the local restaurant scene. Word was that Deliveroo had started building its own kitchens on a piece of wasteland up the road, just the other side of Hornsey railway line; the newly installed units had no windows, people said, and a security guard was posted on the door. Kurt couldn’t understand it. “What do you think is going on in there?” he asked fellow restaurateurs. “What do Deliveroo know about cooking?”

If you live in one of the 150 British towns and cities now served by Deliveroo, the firm’s turquoise logo probably feels ubiquitous these days: plastered on stickers inside takeaway windows, bobbing on the backs of cyclists and motorbike riders, flashing across television sets during the evening news. Deliveroo’s much-hyped stock market flotation last month dominated headlines, as did the rapid tumble in its share price after major institutional investors opted to steer clear. Many cited concerns about the company’s corporate governance and potential legal challenges from its 50,000 delivery workers, who are currently classed as self-employed contractors rather than salaried employees.

The Bureau of Investigative Journalism recently claimed that a significant proportion of the riders it sampled earn below the minimum wage, including some who are paid as little as £2 an hour; Deliveroo claims that riders earn £13 an hour on average at the busiest times (although this does not take into account periods in which few or no orders come through) and that the fees paid to riders are increasing year on year.

Amid these controversies, one important fact about Deliveroo has passed relatively unnoticed: the company that the chancellor, Rishi Sunak, calls a “true British tech success story” has never turned a apps that deliver food in my area – even during the Covid lockdowns. It’s hard to imagine a more fortuitous set of circumstances for Deliveroo’s business model than the pandemic, which has led to most people spending several months in effect under house arrest while pubs and dine-in restaurants shut their doors. But despite seeing a huge surge in demand (total orders for the first quarter of 2021 were more than double those for the same period last year), the firm ended up cutting a quarter of its staff jobs in 2020 and relied upon a big cash injection from Amazon to stave off ruin; this year, it is on course to make a loss of almost £300m. And yet financial markets still value the firm at nearly £5bn.

“In a world where consumers want more, better and faster, we think Deliveroo is doing a good job,” concluded a report by the private investment bank Berenberg earlier this month. Plenty of people who make money from money are betting that Deliveroo is on a long-term path to apps that deliver food in my area, even if its current set-up pushes the company further into the red with every order. “We truly believe we are still getting started,” declared Deliveroo’s founder, Will Shu, in a letter to prospective shareholders. “Join us on the journey.” But what is that journey’s ultimate destination? And what will the implications be – for the way we eat, the livelihoods of those who feed us and the future of our neighbourhoods – once we arrive?


West Green Road, home of Shukran Best Kebab, runs for more than a mile through north-east London – from Ducketts Common in the west to Tottenham’s Latin Village market in the east. Step left or right out of Kurt’s doorway and you’ll find yourself immersed in one of the most dense and diverse independent restaurant scenes in the capital. Nigerian diners rub up against Korean fast-food joints; Polish cafes dovetail with Ghanaian bakeries, Caribbean takeaways and Ugandan charity kitchens. Nearly all of them are family-run or owned by just one or two individuals living locally.

“The whole planet is here,” says João Castro, owner of Bom Pecado, a Portuguese restaurant whose name means “Good Sin”, which is famed for its hearty stews and pastel de nata pastries. Castro says that the road’s fusion of culinary cultures lends itself to serendipitous interactions. “It’s a special, social place,” he says. “People end up sitting down next to strangers and discovering who they are.”

Before most of us walked around with smartphones in our pockets, the West Green Road restaurants that offered a takeaway service would handle deliveries themselves. In the mid-2000s, Just Eat, today the biggest player by far in the UK’s food delivery market, began aggregating local takeaway options, allowing customers to browse a range of nearby meal choices on a single website, rather than having to wrestle with a bulging folder of paper menus that had been stuffed through the letterbox. But deliveries were still largely managed in-house, at least until 2013, when Deliveroo kicked off a new generation of highly competitive “food delivery platforms” that provided restaurants with a full toolkit of delivery logistics – from order terminals to a network of drivers on demand. The days of grainy cinema adverts for the local curry house were over; beforelong, Snoop Dogg was promoting your nearest chicken balti on prime-time TV.

At first, many outlets in West Green Road shunned Deliveroo and its rival Uber Eats. For one thing, Deliveroo was oriented towards the wealthier end of the market – “the Waitrose of restaurants, whereas around here we are more Tesco or Aldi”, one Tottenham restaurant owner says. For another, many were happy to concentrate on eat-in clients, only sending meals out in a taxi if needed. But the pandemic changed everything: overnight, access to reliable delivery infrastructure and a ready pool of delivery customers went from being a niche luxury to a vital survival mechanism. Nearly every food outlet in the area is now signed up to the platform, including several off-licences and grocers, a major new target for the company in its quest for perpetual growth. “Deliveroo is here to deliver for restaurants who want to carry on offering their amazing food to families at home during this difficult time,” said Shu, as the country’s first lockdown came into force.

Talk to restaurateurs about their experiences with Deliveroo over the past year, though, and a more complex picture emerges. The Observer has spoken to several cafe- and restaurant-owners in the neighbourhood and, with one exception, who is broadly neutral, all of them are critical of the company. Everybody insists that the commission levels are far too high and that local independents are paying over the odds compared with national chains and prestige brands. There is anger too that restaurants are at the mercy of Deliveroo’s way of ranking them within the app, with little transparency over why some outlets are at the top and others become lost to obscurity down below.

“They woo you with honeyed words and push users towards you at the beginning, so it seems like it’s working out, then you drop like a stone,” claims one. “They’re stealing our customers and we’ve had enough – we’ve told them to come and remove their machines,” says another, referring to the fact that when a restaurant joins the platform it can bring with it a host of devoted fans who Deliveroo can market to other restaurants. “It’s robbery, pure and simple.”

None of the interviewees begrudge Deliveroo the right to charge restaurants for the service it is providing. Their grievances revolve around the fact that by assuming the role of market gatekeeper, the company has a responsibility to play fairly, and that in this regard it is falling short. Speculation abounds that favoured restaurant names, of the type rarely to be found in this part of the city, are able to cut better deals than smaller outlets that are rooted in their communities but have no economic clout when it comes to negotiating fees. Many refer to the fact that unlike their own firms, Deliveroo pays no UK corporation tax, and the restaurant owners suspect the net effect of the company’s operations is that money flows out of a poor neighbourhood – Tottenham’s unemployment rate is currently the fastest growing in the country and its level of child poverty is almost double the national average – and into the pockets of far-flung global investors.

But despite these complaints, almost every restaurant owner says they crbauto no choice but to remain on the platform because that is where the customers now are. Nearly all requested anonymity in this article for fear that speaking out against Deliveroo could see them relegated down the app’s search rankings. The Observer requested an interview with a representative of Deliveroo to discuss criticisms made by its restaurant partners but was told that no one was available.

In a statement, the company said that it was proud to work with more than 50,000 riders and 46,000 restaurant partners in the UK and that it had helped the latter boost their growth during the pandemic. “They are at the heart of our business and their wellbeing and success is our number one priority,” it said. “We have also introduced a wide range of support measures to help our community, from the £16m Rider thank-you fund to the new £50m community fund, which will directly support riders and restaurants partners.”

Underlying many of the restaurants’ concerns is something more intangible: a fear that as many of us become accustomed to selecting lunch or dinner through a smartphone, our relationship to food itself, and the social context that surrounds it, is shifting. Kurt comes from the Kayseri region of Turkey, as do the owners of several ocakbaşı or “grill” restaurants in the area; to him, the local takeaway scene is a rich map of cultural reference points – something intimately bound up with physical geography, in the land from which his cuisine emerged and the places in which it is now cooked here. For customers, eating in small restaurants provides some exposure to that reality; by contrast, ordering a meal through a food delivery platform, where identical-looking options are likely to be sorted by the size of the discounts being offered or how fast a third-party motorbike rider can deliver to you, is an abstract process.

“The interface of an app like Deliveroo appears to be completely flat, even though it’s built on data that is generated in real places, by real people,” says Adam Badger, an academic at Royal Holloway, University of London, who specialises in this subject and has also worked as a courier. “Restaurants become data entries; delivery riders are just a loading bar travelling from left to right across a screen.” Like all seemingly flat surfaces though, Deliveroo’s hard edges are out there – you just have to know where to look.


The Deliveroo Editions site at Cranford Way, north London, sits at the back of an electricity substation, sandwiched between a boxing gym on one side and some overgrown scrub on the other. Despite the rumble of motorcycle engines making their way to and from the entrance, and the beeps of lorries reversing out of the adjacent self-storage and warehouse complex, it feels eerily quiet. You could sit here for hours and almost never hear a human voice.

Like most “dark kitchens”, it occupies the edge lands: spaces that are neither one thing nor another, urban offcuts that are easily overlooked. Other Deliveroo Editions sites in the UK can be found at the back of industrial estates or below traffic flyovers. They typically consist of up to 16 metal boxes roughly the size of shipping containers, packed on to a patch of asphalt with generators humming in between. Compared with West Green Road, Cranford Way feels like a different universe and yet it’s barely half a mile from one end of the street. From here, offerings from Pizza Express, Shake Shack and “Cluckleberry Finn Fried Chicken” – a delivery-only outfit that you won’t find anywhere outside Deliveroo’s app – are pumped out into the city. Thousands of people live in the Deliveroo catchment area for Shukran Best Kebab. Most of them are now, unknowingly, also in the catchment area for Deliveroo Editions.

“Dark kitchens” are places where meals are prepared entirely for delivery. They have been used for decades in areas such as catering for mass events, but the idea of gearing them towards home takeaways is relatively recent. It’s a leap that has only been made possible by the rise of food delivery platforms, and the global leader of the concept is Deliveroo, which opened its first dark kitchen in London in 2016. Today, the company boasts 250 in eight countries, each of them home to a fluid array of tenants, including international chain restaurants, tentative startups and virtual brands, some of which might “exist” on the app for just a few weeks.

To many, the notion of a whole host of different cuisines emerging from the same kitchen – with a chef simultaneously preparing a pizza on one work surface and a Sichuan hot pot on another – feels unsettling, but it reflects the logic of the abstracted digital marketplace; the New Yorker recently described dark kitchens as “the culinary equivalent of a multicolour retractable pen”. To make a success of the operation you need to know what colour to push and that’s where Deliveroo’s vast stores of data come to the fore. “Using our own technology, we can identify specific local cuisines missing in an area, identify customer demand for that missing cuisine and handpick brands that are most likely to appeal to customers in that area,” Deliveroo’s former property acquisitions manager, Patrick Weiss, speaking in 2017,has said.

As the firm’s prospectus for its flotation reveals, Editions lie at the heart of Deliveroo’s vision of the future and its plan to win the delivery-app wars. “With unparalleled global expertise, we are uniquely positioned to scale this concept,” the company claims, and many investors agree. “Deliveroo already has a great database of consumer preferences,” says Ioannis Pontikis, an equity analyst for the financial services firm Morningstar. “And once you’ve set up a dark kitchen, it’s very easy to trial new brand ideas, new food concepts, new marketing and promotions.” Pontikis points out that dark kitchens don’t only have an edge over bricks-and-mortar restaurants when it comes to generating demand: they also benefit from better unit economics – ie a lower cost for each meal produced.

Established restaurants in West Green Road may have spent years building up fixed infrastructure, a trusted reputation and a place for themselves in the area. But when it comes to being able to adaptively predict, produce, advertise and cheaply deliver whatever particular meals are wanted in nearby postcodes at any particular moment – burgers and wings on a Saturday afternoon during an England football game, for example, or comforting bowls of pasta on a rainy weekday evening – Cranford Way blows them all out of the water.

For both existing restaurants and budding restaurateurs, there are some advantages to dark kitchens. In towns bedevilled by crippling rents, setting up shop inside one of the Deliveroo Editions sites rather than taking out an expensive and inflexible lease in the high street is a relatively cheap way of testing demand. Some of Britain’s most innovative food outlets began life as pop-up cafes or mobile trailers at festivals; for many, dark kitchens are the next step in bringing their food to a wider audience. And in the context of the pandemic, during which nearly every restaurant essentially became a dark kitchen at some point, delivery-only production sites have arguably been a lifeline.

Rosa’sThai Cafe, a restaurant that started out as a husband-and-wife operation, and has since grown into a small chain of 24 UK outlets, opened four dark kitchens in the Covid era, including one at Cranford Way. Its chief executive, Gavin Adair, believes that the concept can help to lower entry barriers for established and fledgling restaurants alike and should not be seen solely as a threat to existing businesses. “You don’t have a long-term commitment, which is one of the things that has tripped up some businesses that have tried to grow in the past,” he says. “These kitchens may end up helping to prove there’s enough interest in our product in a particular neighbourhood for us to eventually open up a full restaurant there. Fundamentally, we’re very clear that we’re a restaurant business with an ancillary delivery operation. It’s not an either/or.”

Deliveroo likewise insists that the Editions model is designed to support existing restaurant sites in the high street, not replace those premises, and says that its Editions kitchens have saved some restaurants from going under, enabled local brands to expand apps that deliver food in my area and helped small outfits grow into established names.

But ever-more expansive restaurant choice for consumers is not necessarily good news if the playing field isn’t level. Deliveroo refuses to divulge the commission rates it charges different restaurant partners, yet Adair acknowledges that when it comes to the economics of app-based delivery, his company is in a fortunate position because of its “strong relationship” with the platform; few of the restaurants in West Green Road can say the same. And a fleet-footed future of transitory, disposable virtual brands and site-hopping around industrial parks does not hold much promise if your restaurant is woven into the fabric of a real place, especially if the data being used to construct that future has been gleaned from the hard graft of businesses like yours. Pontikis is convinced that, coronavirus lockdowns aside, there will always be a healthy demand for some eat-in restaurants, particularly those at the higher end of the market. But he says smaller family-run takeaways that have traditionally depended apps that deliver food in my area local awareness and accessibility might find it harder to distinguish themselves within a market wholly geared towards convenience. Their long-term fate, he says remains “the million-dollar question”.

Kurt insists that if dark kitchens ever begin offering meals that directly rival his own, he will rip the Deliveroo sticker from his window and throw it in the bin. But he may already be too late. Deliveroo is no longer the only player in the dark kitchen market: Foodstars, recently bought out by the former Uber boss Travis Kalanick, already operates just east of Shukran Best Kebab, on the edge of a waste-processing plant; last year, Karma Kitchen, which has just landed £250m of new investment, opened its own delivery-only kitchen unit less than two miles north.

In March, Reef, an American company that buys up car parks with a view to transforming them into “hubs for the on-demand economy” – offering a space to everything from vertical farming units to pop-up parcel sorting depots and, of course, dark kitchens – announced it was working with the owners of Wood Green shopping centre, 10 minutes by motorbike from Kurt’s front door. In Miami, Reef is experimenting with the use of robots to deliver meals, a move that some analysts believe Deliveroo is bound to copy in the years to come. In China – where the nexus between food delivery platforms and dark kitchens is more advanced, and the market has been sewn up by two of the country’s biggest tech giants, Alibaba and Tencent – data and automation have combined to enable the creation of specialist production sites engineered to churn out a single popular dish without any human involvement at all. Most people currently think of Deliveroo as an app that connects local restaurants with delivery drivers. But standing in West Green Road, with dark kitchens rapidly closing in, it’s hard not to suspect that the ultimate aim of the venture-capitalist subsidised food tech industry might be to do away with both.


In the meantime, however, Deliveroo still has to contend with real humans and restaurants, many of which are increasingly unafraid to kick up a fuss. Earlier this month, striking Deliveroo riders in central London protested for a living wage on the day of the firm’s stock market launch. On arrival at Deliveroo’s headquarters, where City of London police officers guarded the doors, the president of the Independent Workers of Great Britain trade union, which represents some of the delivery workers, addressed the crowd. “While the pandemic has been going on and you’ve been putting your lives and your families’ apps that deliver food in my area at risk to deliver food,” Alex Marshall yelled through a megaphone, “this company has been getting richer and richer, even as your own pay and conditions have worsened!” More strikes, protests and legal challenges from riders are being promised. According to Deliveroo, internal polling indicates that 89% of riders are apps that deliver food in my area or very satisfied with the status quo and that there is “overwhelming” support for the company and its flexible labour model.

That has not prevented the emergence in recent years of an array of grassroots alternatives to the leading food delivery platforms – from regional courier collectives to online services that allow small restaurants to market delivery options directly to customers, without the use of Just Eat, Uber Eats or Deliveroo. One Deliveroo rider is helping to build an ethical food delivery platform that will shortly be launched in north London, promising a guaranteed living wage for drivers, zero-emissions vehicles and a refusal to work with large chains or dark kitchens; now, some restaurant owners are getting in on the act as well. Henal Chotai, proprietor of Red Cup Cafe in Harrow, north-west London, with his wife, Reena, is co-developing an eco-friendly delivery service called FoodeBikes; he believes that as the UK emerges from lockdown, public appetite for platforms that do a better job of supporting independent restaurants is growing fast.

“Independent restaurants in this country are on their knees right now, but at the same time the value of what we bring to society – the importance of real, human hospitality, the places where you go and form happy memories – has been magnified,” Chotai says. “We’re battered and bruised, but we’re ready to fight for our futures. So I beg everyone, when you can: go out and visit your local small restaurant, find a way of buying from them directly. We’ve been here for our local communities and we need our local communities to help us – and the country at large – get back on our feet.”

Other tech giants – Uber for taxis, Airbnb for holiday homes – have eventually come up against public and regulatory backlashes, although in many cases that has done little to clip apps that deliver food in my area wings. In the wake of a recent court ruling requiring Uber to reclassify its drivers as workers rather than independent contractors, Deliveroo may soon be heading in the same direction. In the end, however, neither minor legislative tweaks nor individual consumer choices alone will be enough to turn the tide, unless we decide as a society that the food delivery platform model as it’s currently conceived will damage things we care about, such as local restaurants or workers’ rights.

Badger argues that Deliveroo is a product of the economic and political systems that sustain it; if we want it to function differently, then we have to start there. “This is a company that reflects and replicates the structures of monopolistic venture capital,” he says. “For decades, we had a takeaways market that wasn’t monopolistic – it was the opposite, it was fragmented and local. Then speculative financial interests came in to change that. Yes, there are existing regulations, particularly on labour rights, which Deliveroo should be made to adhere to, and new ones that should be brought in. But more broadly, if we want Deliveroo to have better priorities then we all have to fight for a better society. Deliveroo are not the problem on their own.”

Deliveroo is continuing to expand: the company plans to set up in 100 more British towns this year and hopes to eventually become the first thing that any of us think about whenever we think about food. “Our mission is to be the definitive online food company,” the firm announced recently. “The way we think about it is simple: there are 21 meal occasions in a week – breakfast, lunch and dinner, seven days a week. Right now, less than one of those 21 transactions takes place online. We are working to change that.”

In one sense, the company is right: transformations in how we eat are inevitable. The history of the takeaway has been evolving ever since the Roman empire served on-the-go lentils in thermopoliaand Aztec market vendors flogged tamales; it would be a mistake to romanticise a culinary past in which various forms of exploitation have been omnipresent. But it is worth remembering that every reconfiguration of the way we live and the resources we rely on, including restaurants, meals and the people who produce and deliver them, involves a reconfiguration of power, creating winners and losers. Global investors are gambling billions on an app-driven, dark kitchen-dominated future, and it’s clear who will emerge triumphant if that future materialises.

“We, this street, everyone round here … we’ve helped make Deliveroo rich,” Kurt says. “But is what’s good for them going to be good for us?” The answer to that question – for Shukran Best Kebab and thousands of other small restaurants like it – is in our hands.

This article was amended on 27 April 2021 to clarify that Patrick Weiss is Deliveroo’s former property acquisitions manager.

Источник: https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2021/apr/25/deliveroo-tech-delivery-restaurant-service-dark-kitchens

We deliver groceries in minutes

Over 1,500 everyday 

products

Shop for snacks, drinks, fresh produce and more from the brands you know and love.

Delivery in minutes

day or night

No need to book a slot — we deliver in minutes from early morning until late at night.

Absolutely 

no substitutions

We have a real-time inventory, so what you order is what you get. Exactly how it should be.

Minutes matter

Life is hectic. We deliver groceries in minutes so that you can spend more time doing the things you love.

Plenty to choose from

Want or need something? We’ve got a wide range of everyday products from the brands you love.

Delivery when you want it

We deliver from morning until late at night. Check the app to see if we deliver to you!

Deals and promotions

Get exclusive offers on your favourite products and be delighted with the price.

Rate your experience

Give us a star rating and add a comment too. We love hearing what you think is good and what we could do better.

Ready to order?

Get your grocery shopping delivered in minutes. Download Getir.

Источник: https://getir.uk/

Analysis: Eat or be eaten? Food delivery apps have knives out as pandemic boom fades

  • Food delivery growth seen continuing into winter
  • Analysts say loss-making industry is ripe for consolidation
  • Takeaway to address investors on U.S., grocery strategy
  • Deliveroo raises FY forecasts after strong third quarter

AMSTERDAM, Oct 20 (Reuters) - The meal delivery market is expected to turn to a phase of consolidation in the coming months as players look to adjust operations after the explosive boom in demand served up to them during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The industry, which includes the likes of Uber Eats (UBER.N), Just Eat Takeaway (TKWY.AS) and Deliveroo (ROO.L), generally saw share prices spike during 2020 as lockdowns and other restrictions kept people eating at home.

Investor sentiment has turned in 2021 in anticipation of a return to normal, but experts say consumers' ordering habits have likely changed permanently.

Register now for FREE unlimited access to reuters.com

"Food delivery app usage has not slowed down, even as consumers return to in-person dining more frequently," said Alisha Apps that deliver food in my area of Similarweb, which analyses web traffic and app downloads.

Yet most of the companies are losing money and the increasing need for scale means the market is ripe for consolidation, according to industry experts.

Kapur said it was "very rare" for significant numbers of consumers to change the meal delivery apps they're accustomed to using, with "a few exceptions that demonstrate the largest players are only grabbing more share".

Stock prices across the sector have stabilised after the pandemic-driven spike and many players have actually seen them fall this year, also hit by developments such as a 15% cap on commission fees they can charge restaurants in New York City, imposed in August.

While Amazon-backed Deliveroo raised its full-year guidance on Wednesday, its shares are still trading well below its 390 pence March IPO price. read more

DIGESTING GRUBHUB

Just Eat Takeaway has fared the worst, though.

Its $7.3 billion acquisition of American rival GrubHub in June looked smart against the new industry landscape, but it has left the Dutch-based company heavily exposed to the New York cap, which it says will cost it around 100 million euros ($116 million) in the second half of this year. read more

Takeaway shares have sunk more than 20% this year prompting a major long-term shareholder, Cat Rock, to call on management to sell assets and explore strategic combinations.

As a result, the company is at the centre of industry deal talk.

Potential targets for acquisition, according to analysts, include Takeaway's 33% stake in iFood of Brazil, valued at more than $3 billion, parts of its U.S. business, which requires significant investment, and its French business, which trails Uber and Deliveroo in that market.

Takeaway reported weaker than expected third-quarter orders last week, but CEO Jitse Groen said it was seeing business improve in several countries as workers returned to offices and the weather worsened heading into winter. read more

Groen and other senior executives are due to meet worried investors on Thursday to outline strategy.

"Investors are looking for a clear plan to improve in the U.S., a clear plan to defend market shares in Europe, and especially in Germany, said Clément Genelot, an analyst at Bryan Garnier & Co, who launched coverage of Takeaway with a well-timed "Sell" recommendation in May.

"And also a clear vision and a clear plan to quickly roll out grocery delivery."

Takeaway said it was confident it would address key investor concerns, including an update on "portfolio management" and investment priorities, at the capital markets day.

'LEANING INTO GROCERY'

Grocery delivery is proving another hot area for deals and partnerships in the industry.

Deliveroo has been most aggressive in working with grocery chains, with the support of 12% shareholder Amazon.

Uber told Reuters its meal delivery business was also "very much leaning into grocery", pointing to a deal with Britain's Sainsbury's and France's Carrefour.

Others are looking to take advantage on a blizzard of launches of "on demand" grocery delivery startups, especially in Europe.

DoorDash (DASH.N) has invested in Germany's Flink. Delivery Hero, one of Takeaway's oldest competitors, said on Tuesday it has taken an 8% stake in another German startup, Gorillas.

Delivery Hero, a prolific investor, owns 7.4% of Takeaway and a 5.03% stake in Deliveroo. It also owns 37% of Glovo, and the pair sold each other operations in the Balkans and in Latin America during the pandemic.

Technology investor Prosus (PRX.AS) in turn owns 27.42% of Delivery Hero and a majority stake in Brazil's iFood, setting the Prosus-Delivery Hero pair up as possible deal brokers.

($1 = 0.8604 euros)

Register now for FREE unlimited access to reuters.com

Reporting by Toby Sterling; Additional reporting by Anna Rzhevkina, Zuzanna Szymanska, Paul Sandle; Editing by Pravin Char

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

Источник: https://www.reuters.com/technology/eat-or-be-eaten-food-delivery-apps-have-knives-out-pandemic-boom-fades-2021-10-20/

Why Food Delivery App Orders Can Cost Up To 44 Percent More

An investigation by consumer champion ‘Which?’ has revealed that food ordered via delivery apps such as Deliveroo, Just Eat, and Uber Eats can be considerably more expensive than dealing directly with the food outlet.

Food Delivery Apps

Seven out of 10 people in the UK (Which? survey) say they now use food delivery apps.  Popular delivery apps such as Deliveroo, Just Eat, and Uber Eats work by allowing customers to place food orders from different restaurants and fast-food outlets in an area using an app on their smartphone or tablet device. Once the restaurant receives, accepts, and confirms a paid-for order, the nearest delivery person is directed to the restaurant from where they take the prepared food to the customer using the navigation in the app. Customers can check the delivery person’s status, location, and ETA on the app.

Deliveroo and Uber Eats have also now added groceries to their platforms so the above process differs slightly in terms of order-picking and delivery method.

Price Differences

The ‘Which?’ survey showed that ordering via the apps cost significantly more than ordering directly from the restaurant, even when delivery costs are accounted for. This is because in addition to individual items varying in price, there are also commission charges for the restaurants which may be reflected in higher pricing.

Comparison

In the Which? survey, a comparison was made between the cost breakdown and price of the same dishes (Chicken Shish & Mixed Grill) ordered from the same Lebanese restaurant, but using the three different Deliveroo, Just Eat, and Uber Eats delivery apps. The results showed that ordering a Chicken Shish direct from the restaurant cost £12.95 but ordered via Deliveroo and Just Eat the price was £13.95, and £14.95 via Uber Eats.

The Which? survey also compared the purchase of the same groceries purchased direct from the Co-Op, and purchased using the Deliveroo App.  The total price of a direct purchase was £35.40, whereas the price of purchasing the same groceries using Deliveroo was found to be £48.09, a whole £12.69 more!

Commission Paid To Apps

According to Which? the extra expense appears to be down restaurants simply charging more to get back some of the money they must pay out in commission to the apps. The commission can account for anywhere between 15 percent and 35 percent of the total cost of an order. Delivery apps such as Uber Eats, for example, may offer participating restaurants a zero percent commission for the first 40 days before moving the commission rate up.

The Which? report suggests that with delivery app services essentially taking over from people going to the high street during the pandemic lockdowns, restaurants may have felt as though they were faced with the choice being of Deliveroo (for example) and at least getting some business while having to put up with the commission payments, or not being on Deliveroo but essentially becoming invisible and potentially going out of business. The evidence presented in the Which? report also appears to show that for some restaurants with higher running costs, the commission charges of the app delivery service may make using the service unviable.

Customer Complaints

The Which? survey appears to show that even though customers are having to pay more to have their food delivered, they are not always receiving value due to problems often related to delivery.  For example, 59 percent of Deliveroo users and 53 percent of Uber Eats customers reported problems with their orders over the last 12 months. The most common complaints were found to be late delivery, cold food and missing items.

Complaint Complications

It also appears that the fact that there is an extra, third-party service involved (i.e. the delivery app) means that in some cases, customers can find themselves being passed around between the app and the restaurant if they complain and so they don’t always receive a satisfactory resolution.

Resolution Complications

The Which? survey also found that although consumer law states that customers should get what they paid in the first place as a refund, in some cases, customers have been offered an in-app credit with an expiry date instead of a full refund.

Amazon and Deliveroo

Back in April last year, after the UK Competition and Markets Authority’s (CMA) had considered competition concerns, it was decided that Amazon could invest in food distribution company Deliveroo.  Amazon had previously operated its own ‘Amazon Restaurants’ food delivery service in London, but this was closed in December 2018 following strong competition from Deliveroo, Uber Eats, Just Eat, among and others.

What Does This Mean For Your Business?

Convenience is the big selling point for delivery app customers and there’s no doubt that despite the higher price (compared to direct ordering) these app-based food delivery services have provided an extra layer of value during the pandemic when high streets were effectively closed. For participating restaurants, the app-based delivery services have also provided a lifeline during the pandemic, but one that comes at a cost (i.e. commission paid to the app). There may be an argument, therefore, that now that high streets are again accessible, ordering direct has to be a serious option for customers, not least because the price is lower, but also because any problems are likely to be easier to resolve. For restaurants, although they may receive many orders from app-based delivery services, the ideal situation would be to have more customers ordering direct, thereby cutting out the need for any commission payments.

Share on my social media

Источник: https://astaris.co.uk/non-hospitality-blogs/why-food-delivery-app-orders-can-cost-up-to-44-percent-more/
Android (Free)​​​​

Uber Remains the Best Food Delivery Choice

After analyzing all the top food delivery services, Uber continues to show why it is the best food delivery app to work for. Being the most popular food ordering app, there are plenty of opportunities to grab deliveries and make a quick buck. Aside from that, it is completely flexible, and you can work any times you wish.

To incentivize working during less competitive and busy times, Uber offers great promotions and occasional bonuses. With Postmates orders coming through the app as well, you can get extra earning opportunities. While other delivery apps can provide a great supplement income, Uber continues to provide the best food delivery app working experience.

What Is the Best Food Delivery App?

We've categorized all the best food delivery apps to show you where to get the best deals, the quickest delivery, and more.

Read Next

ShareTweetEmail

About The Author
Joe Cason (29 Articles Published)

Joe is a former web designer and current entrepreneur and freelance writer. He is passionate about making technology assessable for everyone. When not writing for MakeUseOf, he can be found skateboarding, hiking, and attending graduate school.

More From Joe Cason

Subscribe to our newsletter

Join our newsletter for tech tips, reviews, free ebooks, and exclusive deals!

Click here to subscribe