boone county indiana republican party

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Boone county indiana republican party -

Brian Buchanan

State Senator - District 7

Elected

Indiana State Senate, 2018 - Present

Political Affiliation

Republican

Standing Committees

Tax and Fiscal Policy, ranking member

Agriculture

Education and Career Development

Natural Resources

Education

Purdue University, B.S. Agricultural Education

Activities

Board Member, AgriInstitute
Member, Indiana FFA Leadership Center Committee
Mentor, Boone County Mentorship Program

Religious Affiliation

Lebanon Christian Church

Personal

Married, Elisha
Children, Chase and Ali

Counties Served

White County and portions of Boone, Carroll, Clinton, Jasper and Tippecanoe counties

Brian Buchanan

State Senator - District 7

Brian Buchanan

State Senator - District 7

2021 Summary of New Laws - Sen. Buchanan

2021 Summary of New Laws - Sen. BuchananDownload

Brian Buchanan

State Senator - District 7

Источник: https://www.indianasenaterepublicans.com/buchanan
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Watchdog Indiana LogoWatchdog Lebanon provides information about the revenues, spending, and long-term debt assumption of the local and county governments in Boone County. An online community is established where Boone County Hoosiers work together to help control government growth. This volunteer effort is non-party, non-connected, and non-profit. 

Watchdog Lebanon is an advocate for good government that focuses on the local tax burden of Boone County working families.

"The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, ... who at the best, knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat." - Theodore Roosevelt

Watchdog Lebanon was founded by Aaron Smith on November 14, 2001. Aaron's resides in Lebanon Indiana, and his biographical information can be found online at http://www.finplaneducation.net/aaron.htm. 

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Immediate action needed!
06/17/2019:
The City of Lebanon chose to accept the maximum permissible Payment In Lieu Of Taxes (PILOT) payments allowed by state law from our Lebanon Utilities every year beginning in 2011 when the City�s Resolution No. 2010-07 was adopted on December 13, 2010.

The following spreadsheet details how the maximum permissible 2011-2018 PILOT payments from our Lebanon Utilities to the City�s General Fund have totaled $3,564,988:

Lebanon Utilities PILOT History 2011-2018

PILOT = Payments In Lieu Of Taxes from Lebanon Utilities to the City of Lebanon General Fund

(Compiled June 13, 2019)

SOURCES:

(1) March 4, 2019, E-mail from the Lebanon Utilities Chief Financial Officer.

(2) May 17, 2019, E-mail from the Lebanon Utilities Chief Financial Officer.

Year

Electric

Water

Wastewater

Telecommunications

Total

2018 Actual

$164,823

$146,038

$206,142

$2,589

$519,592

2017 Actual

$164,899

$132,985

$208,877

$2,508

$509,269

2016 Actual

$139,574

$130,558

$207,619

$2,617

$480,368

2015 Actual

$136,728

$134,296

$214,070

$2,327

$487,421

2014 Actual

$109,175

$124,203

$207,814

$1,948

$443,140

2013 Actual

$96,950

$125,171

$208,240

$1,494

$431,855

2012 Actual

$80,880

$105,313

$185,181

$1,957

$373,331

2011 Actual

$64,021

$88,638

$165,397

$1,956

$320,012

TOTALS

$957,050

$987,202

$1,603,340

$17,396

$3,564,988

Electric

Water

Wastewater

Telecommunications

Grand Total

The current PILOT payments just add to the City�s General Fund cash balance because the City does not dedicate any of these payments to meet the City�s ongoing needs.

According to the Annual Financial Report data from the Indiana Gateway website, the City�s General Fund cash balance from 12/31/2010 to 12/31/2018 increased $3,960,760 (or 258 percent from $1,537,885 to $5,498,645). It is informative to note that the City�s 2011-2018 General Fund cash balance increased $395,772 WITHOUT the PILOT payments. Also, the 2011-2018 cash balance increases in the City�s other governmental activities funds totaled $10,021,602. It is clear that Lebanon City Council Members, Lebanon Mayors, and the Lebanon Clerk-Treasurer have so successfully managed the City�s finances that supplemental PILOT payments from our Lebanon Utilities are not currently needed.

Resolution 2019-02 was passed unanimously by your Lebanon Utilities Service Board (LUSB) on June 5 and recommends that the City revise its Resolution 2010-07 as follows:
    In accordance with Indiana Code � 8-1. 5-3-8(g), the Common Council of the City of Lebanon ("City") hereby elects to transfer to the City's General Fund, a payment in lieu of taxes from the rates and charges of Lebanon Utilities in an amount up to the taxes that would be due the City on the property owned by Lebanon Utilities as if the property were privately owned. The amount of PILOT collected from the Utility will be reviewed and determined by the City on an annual basis, after presentation from the Utility during the City's budget work sessions which shall include projected capital improvement projects to the Utility infrastructure.

This recommended revision to the City�s Resolution 2010-07 would change the City�s decision-making process regarding Lebanon Utilities PILOT payments as listed next.

1. Our Lebanon City Council, with the approval of our Lebanon Mayor, would have the option to decide each year whether the City needs to have any PILOT payments transferred to the City�s General Fund from our Lebanon Utilities. The City could accept on a yearly basis either (a) the maximum permissible PILOT payments, (b) no PILOT payments whatsoever, or (c) any amount less than the maximum permissible PILOT payments. Currently the City is required to accept the maximum permissible PILOT payments allowed by state law from our Lebanon Utilities every year.

2. Lebanon Utilities would present its planned utility infrastructure capital improvements to our City Council, Mayor, and Clerk-Treasurer during the City�s budget work sessions each year.

3. Our City Council, with the approval of our Mayor, would decide each year whether or not to accept any PILOT payments from out Lebanon Utilities.

4. The PILOT payments not accepted by the City would be deposited in PILOT Reserve Funds established by our Lebanon Utilities.

5. The Lebanon Utilities PILOT Reserve Funds would all be spent on the planned utility infrastructure capital improvements so that the balance in each Reserve Fund would be zero by the end of the year.

If the City were to change its Resolution No. 2010-07 so that the PILOT payments made by our Lebanon Utilities to the City could be reduced or eliminated, then the PILOT amounts retained by our Lebanon Utilities would be spent on the capital project needs of our wastewater, electric, water, and telecommunications departments � while avoiding utility rate increases that would unnecessarily harm too many of our vulnerable neighbors.

The current $558,368 inPILOT payments from our Lebanon Utilities are not now needed to subsidize our City government because the able management of our elected officials, together with recent increases in existing taxes and the imposition of new taxes, have provided ample revenues to meet our City�s needs.

Our Mayor Matt Gentry ([email protected], 765-482-1201) has agreed that the City�s Resolution 2010-07 should be changed as recommended! You may want to contact Mayor Gentry and thank him for his ratepayer (and taxpayer) friendly decision � and contact our City Council members to express your opinion about changing the City�s Resolution 2010-07: Keith Campbell ([email protected]), John Copeland ([email protected]), Dan Fleming ([email protected]), Morris Jones ([email protected]), Mike Kincaid ([email protected] ), Dick Robertson ([email protected]), Brent Wheat ([email protected]).

Did You Know?
06/18/2020:
Two deadly force categories of neck restraints are recognized for use by law enforcement agencies: (a) the chokehold that restricts a suspect's ability to breathe by applying pressure to the suspect's windpipe and (b) the vascular neck restraint that temporarily cuts off blood flow to the brain causing a suspect to go unconscious for a short period (when properly applied to a healthy suspect). Relevant information about the use of neck restraints by the Lebanon Police Department can be found online at http://finplaneducation.net/LPD_Neck_Area.htm. Also, relevant information about the use of neck restraints by the Boone County Sheriff's Office can be found online at http://finplaneducation.net/BCSO_Neck_Area.htm.

  Lebanon Sanitary Sewer Backup Prevention

Raw sewage backups in Lebanon homes present serious health hazards from exposure to the pathogens and allergens that fester in sewage waste. The Indiana State Department of Health has identified the following diseases caused by raw sewage and sewage contaminated water: Campylobacteriosis, Cryptosporidiosis, Escherichia coli Diarrhea, Encephalitis, Gastroenteritis, Giardiasis, Hepatitis A, Leptospirosis, Methaemoglobinaemia, Poliomyelitis, Salmonellosis, Shigellosis, Paratyphoid Fever, Typhoid Fever, and Yersiniosis. Details regarding these dangerous diseases can be found online at http://www.in.gov/isdh/22963.htm.

The elimination of improper sump pump and other connections to the sanitary sewer system is an important first step in preventing Lebanon�s sanitary sewer backups. A Special Report has been prepared by Watchdog Lebanon regarding the prevention of sanitary sewer backups in Lebanon homes. The Special Report sections include (1) Introduction, (2) Lebanon Sanitary System Overview, (3) Lebanon Sanitary Sewer Backup Sources, (4) Lebanon Sanitary Sewer Backup Solutions, (5) Proper Storm Water Management For Morningside & Edgewood Homeowners, (6) Voluntary Compliance Is Important, (7) Home Sump Pumps A Likely Problem, (8) Disconnecting Home Sump Pumps Will Prevent Most Sanitary Sewer Backups, (9) Payment Options To Correct Improper Sanitary Sewer Connections. The Special Report can be found online at http://www.finplaneducation.net/sewer_backup_prevention.htm.

The raw sewage backups into some Lebanon homes during significant rain events must be eliminated because they create serious health hazards.

 

Lebanon Topics Index

Boone County Free Public Records Directory
Consumer Price Index
Family Meals Tax: Lebanon Food and Beverage Tax.
Free Speech Guarantees
Get-Ahead Wage
Greater Lebanon Community Vision Committee
Huck Lewis Campaign Contributions: 2010-2015 Summary and 2014 Receipts & Expenditures and 2015 Receipts & Expenditures
Huck Lewis Election Law Violations Complaint
Indiana Statewide COVID-19 Statistics
Lebanon Backyard Chickens
Lebanon Business Park: 2014 Property Taxes and 2014 School Taxes and Tax Increment Financing Area Impact.
Lebanon Candidate Information:
   2015 Lebanon Mayor Candidates: Matt Gentry, Harold "Huck" Lewis
   2015 Lebanon City Council Candidates: Keith A. Campbell, John Copeland, Dan Fleming, Larry A. Hysong, Mike Kincaid, Lana M. Kruse, Corey Kutz, Jeremy Lamar, Steve Large, Preston Myers, Kevin Van Horn
   2014 Lebanon Community School Corporation Board of Trustees Candidates: Allen D. Douglass, Elizabeth Padgett (Liz) Keith, Tom Merritt
   2011 Lebanon Candidates (Lebanon Clerk Treasurer)
   2007 Lebanon Candidates (November 6, 2007, Lebanon Mayor General Election)
   2003-2005 Lebanon City Council Voting Record
   2002-03 Lebanon Candidates (November 4, 2003, Lebanon Mayor and City Council General Election; November 5, 2002, Boone County Council District 3 General Election; May 7,2002, Boone County Commissioner District 1 Republican Primary)
Lebanon Cash Reserves
Lebanon City Attorney
Lebanon City Budgets: 2015 and 2016.
Lebanon City Council Election Districts
Lebanon City Expenditures Per Capita
Lebanon City Finances: 1997-2004 and 2004-2015
Lebanon Clerk-Treasurer Attorney
Lebanon Conservation League Purchase
Lebanon Eminent Domain Coercions
Lebanon "Gateways" - Indianapolis Avenue Project
Lebanon "Gateways" - SR 39 Bridge Project
Lebanon Growth Projections
Lebanon Hot Pond
Lebanon I-65 Corridor Annexation
Lebanon I-65 Corridor Master Drainage Plan
Lebanon Interchange Land Use Plan
Lebanon Iron Men Properties Projects: Memory Hall Flats, The Flats at Memory Hall, The 451 Flats.
Lebanon Memorial Park Swimming Pool
Lebanon Municipal Building
Lebanon Police Department Use of Force: Neck Area
Lebanon Property Tax Bills Database
Lebanon Property Tax Comparison: Residential and Farm.
Lebanon Property Tax Multiple Homestead Deductions
Lebanon Property Tax Rates
Lebanon Property Taxes
Lebanon Public Library Expansion
Lebanon Public Library Expenditures Per Capita
Lebanon Public Library Taxpayer Friendly Action Plan
Lebanon Redevelopment Commission
Lebanon Rental Inspections: Includes Lebanon 2014 & 2015 Fire Fatalities and Lebanon O.P.E.N. Rental Inspection Program.
Lebanon Schools - 2010 Referendum
Lebanon Schools - Alternative High School (The Crossing National, Inc.)
Lebanon Schools - Education Outcomes Comparison (Public School Corporations with Boone County Students): 2014 and 2013.
Lebanon Schools - Expenditures Per Capita & Student
Lebanon Schools - Finances
Lebanon Schools - Herman B Wells Community Conference Center
Lebanon Schools - Lebanon Business Park School Taxes
Lebanon Schools - New School Need
Lebanon Schools - Property Tax History
Lebanon Schools - Superintendent Compensation
Lebanon Sump Pump Program: Estimated Costs
Lebanon Storm Water Management - 2016 Proposed Fee Increases
Lebanon Storm Water Management - Overview
Lebanon Tax Abatements
Lebanon Taxpayer Friendly Smart Growth Plan
Lebanon Transportation Funding Increases
Lebanon Utilities - 2010 Operating Efficiency Analysis
Lebanon Utilities - Electric 2012 Rate Increase
Lebanon Utilities - Electric IURC Regulation
Lebanon Utilities - Elizaville Road Project
Lebanon Utilities - Fire Hydrants Analysis
Lebanon Utilities - Hydrant Rental Fee
Lebanon Utilities - New 69 kV Electric Transmission Line
Lebanon Utilities - Payments in Lieu of Taxes (PILOT)
Lebanon Utilities - Telecommunications Division Profitability
Lebanon Utilities - Wastewater 2015 Rate Increase
Lebanon Utilities - Wastewater (Sanitary Sewer) Backup Prevention
Lebanon Utilities - Wastewater (Sanitary Sewer) Financial Analysis 
Lebanon Utilities - Wastewater (Sanitary Sewer) Treatment Plant Operation
Lebanon Utilities - Water Financial Analysis
Lebanon Vincennes University Gene Haas Training and Education Center
Lebanon Watch Government Meetings Schedule
Lebanon Workforce Development Options
Lebanon Worth Annexation
Lebanon's FAILED "Vision"
Local Government Meetings Schedule
Petition and Remonstrance
Population Data: City Of Lebanon; Center Township; Boone County; State Of Indiana.
Public Access Laws
Related Sites: Boone County Area Plan Commission; Boone County Chamber of Commerce; Boone County Community Network; Boone County Economic Development Corporation; Boone County E-mail Directory; Boone County Farm Bureau, Boone County Republicans; Boone REMC; Lebanon (City Of), Indiana; Lebanon Community School Corporation; Lebanon Community Vision Committee.
Ronald Reagan Parkway
STATS Indiana: Provides easy, one-stop access to critical statistics for states, counties, cities and towns, townships, regions, census tracts, and more.
Unemployment Rates: Hoosiers By The Numbers.

 

Boone County Topics Index

Boone County Alcoholic Beverage Board
Boone County Appointed Local Government Boards
Boone County Candidate Information:
   2016 Boone County Commissioner Candidates: Andy Dardini, Larry Hysong, Don Lawson, Jeff Wolfe.
   2016 Boone County Council Candidates: Tad D. Braner, Brian Buchanan, Don Cooper, Steve Freeland, Jim Love, Elise Nieshalla, Dax Norton, Marcia C. Wilhoite.
   2014 Boone County Commissioner Candidates: Marc Applegate, Julia Evinger.
   2014 Boone County Council Candidates: Ken P. Campbell, Jon "Chip" Cravens, John W. Hamilton, John W. Hume, Jim Hundley, Steve Jacob, David Rodgers, Tom Santelli, Jay Schaumberg, Debby Shubert, Gene Thompson.
   2014 Boone County Superior Court 2 Judge Candidates: Campaign Fundraising.
   2014 Center Township Board Candidates: Penny S. Bogan, Larry Hysong, Benjamin "Benjy" Johnson, Tami Richardson, Richard "Dick" Robertson, Jane Ann Taylor, Brent Wheat.
   2014 Center Township Trustee Candidates: Randall "Randy" Large, Eric R. Ping, Adam Walker, Robert L. Wirey.
   2012 Boone County Candidates (Boone County Council).
   2008 Boone County Candidates (Boone County Auditor Primary Election).
   2006 Boone County Candidates (Boone County Council General Election).
   2004 Boone County Candidates (November 2, 2004, Boone County Commissioners General Election; November 2, 2004, Boone County Council General Election; May 4, 2004, Boone County Commissioners Republican Primary; May 4, 2004, Boone County Council Republican Primary).
   2002-03 Boone County Candidates (November 4, 2003, Lebanon Mayor and City Council General Election; November 5, 2002, Boone County Council District 3 General Election; May 7,2002, Boone County Commissioner District 1 Republican Primary).
   2002 Boone County Council Voting Record.
Boone County Campaign Contributions History (for selected local candidates within Boone County)
Boone County Commissioner Election Districts
Boone County Council 2014 Budget
Boone County Council 2015 Budget
Boone County Council 2021 Budget
Boone County Cumulative Capital Development Property Tax
Boone County Democratic Party Rules
Boone County Departments & Offices Employment: Compared With Twenty-Six Selected Indiana Counties.
Boone County Disbursements
Boone County Education Outcomes Comparison (Public School Corporations with Boone County Students): 2014 and 2013.
Boone County Expenditures Per Capita
Boone County Financial Analysis (Completed by Watchdog Indiana on April 19, 2012).
Boone County Growth Projections
Boone County Highway Department
Boone County I-65 North Overlay District
   Overlay District for the Northern Portion of Interstate 65 
   I-65 North Overlay Zoning District Document 
   Land Owners Within I-65 North Overlay District 
   Overlay District Questions for I-65 North Corridor Land Owners
   I-65 North Overlay District Map
Boone County Key Bank Building Purchase
Boone County Local Governments Nepotism
Boone County Local Income Tax
Boone County Mapleview Rest Home
Boone County Park Tax
Boone County Police Departments
Boone County Property Tax Bills Database
Boone County Property Tax Multiple Homestead Deductions
Boone County Property Taxes
Boone County Republican Party Rules
Boone County Sheriff: Use of Force: Neck Area and 2016 Business Plan and Office Management.
Boone County Solid Waste Management District
Boone County Tax Abatements
Boone County Tax Increment Financing Districts
Boone County Transportation Funding Increases
Boone County Utilities
Boone County Water Resources
Consumer Price Index
Convention Center
County Option Income Tax (COIT)
Duke Realty (Anson) Project.
Emergency Telephone System (E911) Fee
Free Speech Guarantees
Get-Ahead Wage
Indiana Statewide COVID-19 Statistics
Jeff Wolfe Campaign Contributions History
Local Government Meetings Schedule
Petition and Remonstrance
Population Data: City Of Lebanon; Center Township; Boone County; State Of Indiana.
Public Access Laws
Recount Commission: 2002 Boone County Commissioner District 1.
Related Sites: Boone County Area Plan Commission; Boone County Chamber of Commerce; Boone County Community Network; Boone County Economic Development Corporation; Boone County E-mail Directory; Boone County Farm Bureau, Boone County Republicans; Boone REMC; Lebanon (City Of), Indiana; Lebanon Community School Corporation; Lebanon Community Vision Committee.
Ronald Reagan Parkway
STATS Indiana: Provides easy, one-stop access to critical statistics for states, counties, cities and towns, townships, regions, census tracts, and more.
Thorntown Clerk-Treasurer Investigation
Unemployment Rates: Hoosiers By The Numbers.
Wheel Tax
Worth Township-Whitestown 2012 Reorganization (Approved Plan of Reorganization Town of Whitestown and Worth Township) (defeated by November 6, 2012 referendum).

 

Watchdog Salem LogoYou Can Help.
Listed below are several ways you can help control taxes and spending in Boone County.

Bookmark this website so you can easily visit Watchdog Lebanon often to help learn about cash revenues, cash spending, and long-term debt assumption in the various Boone County governmental units.

Suggest projects for Watchdog Lebanon to adopt. Please send an E-mail if you know of something that needs the attention of Watchdog Lebanon.

Register to vote. Send an E-mail to the Boone County Clerk to request information on how and where to register to vote.

Review the Watchdog Lebanon  "Boone County Candidate Information" and "Lebanon Candidate Information" (see the above Boone County Topics Index and Lebanon Topics Index) when deciding how to vote in a local Boone County election.

E-mail to the Editor of your local newspaper a letter or opinion article about local cash revenues, cash spending, and long-term debt assumption. Use Letters To The Editor Via E-mail to find the E-mail address of the Editor of your local newspaper.

Use the Local Government Factfinding List to understand and influence the revenues, spending, and long-term debt assumption decisions of your local government.

Watchdog Lebanon summarizes my use of Boone County, Indiana, as a case study to demonstrate how you can work to help control the revenue and spending growth of your local government. Understanding the Fundamental Watchdog Beliefs will help you understand the approach taken in this website. Please send an E-mail telling what you think about Watchdog Lebanon or anything else that comes to mind. Your comments, suggestions, problems, complaints, praise, and opinions are welcome.

Watchdog Indiana Home PageWatchdog Vigilance Home Page

This page was last updated on 11/27/20.

Источник: http://www.finplaneducation.net/watchdog_lebanon.htm

Alabama

Montgomery: The city is planning a week of events to commemorate the 66th anniversary of the Montgomery Bus Boycott. In 1955, a dedicated group of people began standing firm against racist segregation in a boycott that spanned 382 days. Activities and events starting Dec. 1 will take place across the city that are designed to honor those who dedicated and risked their lives. This event is being led by Mayor Steven L. Reed, who recently stood with civil rights attorney Fred Gray to expunge the arrest record for Claudette Colvin. While the bus boycott was officially sparked by the arrest of Rosa Parks for refusing to give up her bus seat to a white man, Colvin was arrested months earlier for the same thing. A unity breakfast will be held Dec. 1 at St. Paul AME Church, and the Rosa Parks Museum will offer free admission all day on the anniversary of her arrest. Free tours of the apartment where she lived from 1951 to 1957 will also be available through the Montgomery Housing Authority. Items inside the home have been preserved or recreated to showcase where many important meetings were held during the civil rights movement. For a full list of activities and events throughout the day next Wednesday and beyond, see mgmbusboycott.com.

Alaska

Anchorage: A man charged with threatening the lives of the state’s two U.S. senators pleaded not guilty Monday, and a judge decided he will remain in custody. Jason Weiner, an attorney for Jay Allen Johnson, entered the plea on his client’s behalf during Johnson’s arraignment in U.S. District Court in Fairbanks. Johnson, from the small community of Delta Junction, was indicted last week on six criminal counts – including threatening to murder a U.S. official, being a felon in possession of firearms, threatening to destroy property by fire and threatening interstate communications. The government is also seeking to confiscate two pistols, three revolvers, a rifle and a shotgun found on Johnson’s rural Alaska property because he is a felon who is not legally allowed to possess firearms. If convicted, Johnson could face a maximum sentence of 50 years in prison and $1.5 million in fines, assistant U.S. Attorney Ryan Tansey said. Johnson, at an earlier hearing, said he is “a senior citizen, and I am highly disabled, and I will not be carrying out any of these threats.” Johnson’s wife testified during a detention hearing in October that her husband was was in pain after recent surgeries and “gets very angry listening to politics on the news.”

Arizona

Phoenix: Volunteers gave out hundreds of free Thanksgiving turkeys Monday as the holidays approach and charities work to help people get what they need to celebrate. The event at the American Legion’s Post No. 65 in south Phoenix helped out about 1,000 families. The 18th Annual Thanksgiving Turkey Giveaway was organized by the Sons of the American Legion and the nonprofit HeroZona Foundation. Gov. Doug Ducey Ducey stopped by to help and said in a statement that he was grateful to the volunteers and community groups that came together to help needy families. “It took teamwork to persevere through all the challenges of COVID-19, and events like the Thanksgiving Turkey Giveaway show us all that Arizona will have that same sense of camaraderie for decades to come,” Ducey said. The governor’s office said about 50 volunteers joined AP Powell, HeroZona’s founding chairman, to hand out the free food. Powell said the group wanted to ensure that “underserved families in South Phoenix have the opportunity to enjoy Thanksgiving with their loved ones – no matter their circumstances.” Charities and nonprofit groups routinely ramp up their efforts around the holidays to provide food and holiday gifts to low-income Arizonans.

Arkansas

Little Rock: A longtime legislator who left the Republican Party earlier this year following the Jan. 6 attack at the U.S. Capitol says he won’t run for reelection next year in the state Senate. Sen. Jim Hendren announced Monday that he would not seek another term representing northwest Arkansas. Hendren is a former president of the state Senate who has served in the chamber since 2013. Previously, he had served in the state House of Representatives from 1995 until 1999. He is the nephew of Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson. Hendren left the GOP in February, citing the deadly riot at the Capitol and then-President Donald Trump’s rhetoric. In his announcement Monday, Hendren did not offer specifics on his future plans but said he planned to do more work with his nonprofit, Common Ground Arkansas. “Of course, that drive to serve isn’t gone,” he said in a statement. “I believe Common Ground has real solutions for Arkansas, and I’m dedicated to helping us build a more unified future together.”

California

Long Beach: The ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles have again postponed imposing fees on containers left on docks too long, citing progress in moving the cargo from marine terminals. The decision was made after a meeting Monday among the U.S. port envoy, John D. Porcari; industry stakeholders; and officials of the adjacent ports, the Port of Long Beach said in a press release. The “container dwell fee” will now not be considered before Nov. 29. “Since the fee was announced on Oct. 25, the two ports have seen a decline of 33% combined in aging cargo on the docks,” the statement said. “The executive directors of both ports are satisfied with the progress thus far and will reassess fee implementation after another week of monitoring data.” The fee was imposed by the harbor commissions of both ports as a measure to help ease congestion that has left dozens of ships waiting offshore.

Colorado

Denver: The president of a suburban police union has been placed on paid administrative leave by the police department after he sent an email to the group’s 240 members calling diversity provisions in an agreement between the city and the state “sexist and racist.” Officer Doug Wilkinson sent the email Nov. 16 and was placed on leave the following day after multiple officers complained to human resources, Lt. Chris Amsler, an aide to Aurora Police Chief Vanessa Wilson, told KCNC-TV. “To match the ‘diversity’ of ‘the community’ we could make sure to hire 10% illegal aliens, 50% weed smokers, 10% crackheads, and a few child molesters and murderers to round it out. You know, so we can make the department look like the ‘community,’ ” Wilkinson wrote in the email. The email was prompted by an agreement announced the same day that set up reforms for the Aurora police and fire departments. The consent decree followed a lengthy state investigation that found a pattern of racist policing and excessive use of force. It calls for updated hiring practices so the police and fire departments better reflect the city’s racial makeup. Wilkinson told KCNC-TV his missive was intended to be “a private email message to the members” and should not have been made public.

Connecticut

Hartford: The state is ramping up efforts to get older residents COVID-19 booster shots by bringing special clinics to nursing homes, Gov. Ned Lamont announced Monday. The move comes as the state has seen its highest infection rates since early September. While many homes had boosters administered shortly after extra vaccine doses received the federal go-ahead, these latest clinics will help those facilities that haven’t finished getting residents and eligible staff another dose. “What we’re talking about now is some of the stragglers. As we’ve seen in the past, unfortunately some homes take a little longer to get organized. And so Dr. Juthani and her team are pushing those homes hard to get those clinics done and making sure that everyone in those homes who is eligible (gets a booster shot),” said Josh Geballe, Lamont’s chief operating officer, referring to Department of Public Health Commissioner Manisha Juthani. Over the past two weeks, the rolling average number of daily new coronavirus cases in Connecticut has risen by 397, an increase of about 117%, according to researchers at Johns Hopkins. Juthani said the state is on target to have had a booster clinic for residents and staff at 70% of long-term care facilities, including assisted living locations, by Thanksgiving. She said the rest will be finished by Dec. 15.

Delaware

The Rev. Al Sharpton meets with supporters after a press conference Monday outside Legislative Hall in Dover, Del., to support the passage of SB 149 to make police disciplinary records public and create community review boards with police oversight.

Dover: At a rally Monday, the Rev. Al Sharpton called on lawmakers to open police up to public scrutiny via the controversial Law Enforcement Officers’ Bill of Rights and lambasted the state for its handling of officer-involved shootings. “It seemed to me ironic, if not insulting, as I was coming in that you have the nerve to name a street after Martin Luther King while the people of Dr. King are being abused by police, and you will not hold them accountable,” Sharpton said outside Legislative Hall. He spoke alongside police reform activists Lakeisha Nix, sister of Lymond Moses, shot and killed by New Castle County police earlier this year; Keandra McDole, sister of Jeremy McDole, a Black man in a wheelchair who was shot and killed by Wilmington police in 2015; and Blaine Hackett, a pastor at St. John African Methodist Church Inc. Sharpton and the local activists criticized Delaware for upholding the decades-old Bill of Rights law that lets police decide how to discipline bad-acting officers and limits how much the public can know about any punishment. The rally, hosted by quasi-grassroots advocacy company Citizens for a Pro-Business Delaware, was held in favor of legislation to amend the Officers’ Bill of Rights by opening up internal affairs records to the public and striking out certain provisions about how officers may be investigated.

District of Columbia

Washington: The regional train system serving the capital region will remain on drastically reduced service levels through at least the end of this year, as authorities grapple with a safety problem that has forced the majority of the trains out of service. Paul J. Wiedefeld, general manager of the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority, announced Monday that there were no set timelines for the return of the 7000-series train cars to service. The trains are the newest in service, and the 748 cars compose about 60% of the fleet. The Metro authority’s safety commission abruptly ordered the withdrawal of the entire 7000-series line of trains in mid-October after a derailing revealed chronic problems with the wheels and axles. “We are intentionally not setting deadlines so that safety and good data drive our decisions, but we are mindful that customers want the best service we can provide as soon as we can deliver it, and we are committed to building back up in phases,” Wiedefeld said in a statement Monday. The original plans to bring older 6000-series trains out of retirement to help fill in the service gaps have been delayed by the global supply chain crisis, which has prevented the arrival of necessary parts.

Florida

Fort Lauderdale: The families of most of those killed and wounded in a 2018 high school massacre have reached a multimillion-dollar settlement with the federal government over the FBI’s failure to stop the gunman even though it had received information he intended to attack. Attorneys for 16 of the 17 killed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland and some of those wounded said Monday that they have reached a monetary settlement with the government over the FBI’s failure to investigate a tip it received about a month before the massacre. The 17th family chose not to sue. The attorneys said the settlement’s details are confidential, but a person familiar with the deal, speaking on condition of anonymity, said the government will pay the families $127.5 million overall. “It has been an honor to represent the Parkland families who, through their immeasurable grief, have devoted themselves to making the world a safer place,” their lead attorney, Kristina Infante, said in a statement. Andrew Pollack, whose 18-year-old daughter, Meadow, died in the shooting, commended the FBI for accepting responsibility for its inaction, comparing it to the Broward County school district and sheriff’s office, the school security staff and the psychologists who treated the shooter. He believes they all failed to stop the shooter and have ducked responsibility. “The FBI has made changes to make sure this never happens again,” Pollack said.

Georgia

Atlanta: The state’s public university system won’t rename any of the 75 buildings or colleges an internal committee had recommended for changes mostly because of their association with slavery, segregation or mistreatment of American Indians, officials voted Monday. The system’s regents voted not to make any name changes, more than a year after they established a committee to study that issue. “History can teach us important lessons, lessons that if understood and applied make Georgia and its people stronger,” the regents said in a statement unanimously adopted by the board at a specially called meeting. The regents added that while the board would not pursue name changes involving the buildings and colleges as recommended by the advisory group’s report, it acknowledged there were many viewpoints on the matter. “Going forward, the board is committed to naming actions that reflect the strength and energy of Georgia’s diversity,” the statement said. Georgia passed a law in 2019 prohibiting state and local agencies from renaming any buildings named after a “historical entity” or removing any historical monument. Several regents released statements after the vote, but none directly explained why they supported making no changes. Many were appointed by Republican Gov. Brian Kemp, who supported the 2019 law.

Hawaii

Honolulu: A male Hawaiian monk seal has died at a Big Island marine mammal hospital after a five-week battle with toxoplasmosis, a parasitic disease spread by cat feces, officials said Monday. Toxoplasmosis is the biggest disease threat facing the Hawaiian monk seal, a critically endangered species numbering just 1,300 animals. The seal that died last week was known as RW22, the Marine Mammal Center said in a news release. The center called on cat owners to keep their feline pets indoors and dispose of litter in the trash to protect the species. Feral cat feces is also a concern. Stray cats have no predators in Hawaii, and their numbers have ballooned. Marketing research commissioned by the Hawaiian Humane Society in 2015 estimated Oahu alone had 300,000 feral cats. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration received a report early last month that RW22 had a fishing line in his mouth off Oahu. An X-ray revealed the seal had swallowed some fishing gear. He also showed signs of partial facial nerve paralysis and a corneal ulcer to his left eye, a suspected symptom of toxoplasmosis. The Coast Guard flew RW22 to the seal hospital in Kailua-Kona, where veterinarians treated the seal in hopes of slowing the rate of infection. He regained some stamina and movement but continued to deteriorate.

Idaho

Boise: The state’s top health official has deactivated crisis guidelines for rationing care at most of the state’s hospitals. Idaho Department of Health and Welfare Director Dave Jeppesen issued the decision Monday after health officials said the number of COVID-19 patients remains high but no longer exceeds health care resources in most areas. Crisis standards remain in effect for northern Idaho. During a news conference, Jeppesen and other health care officials warned of possible future outbreaks. “We are not sharing a ‘mission accomplished’ message,” said James Souza, chief medical officer for St. Luke’s Health System. “We don’t believe this will be our last surge of COVID. We hope it’s the worst one.” Crisis standards of care give legal and ethical guidelines to health care providers when they have too many patients and not enough resources to care for them all. They spell out exactly how health care should be rationed to save the most lives possible during a disaster. Idaho activated the crisis standards for northern Idaho on Sept. 7 and statewide Sept. 16. Officials didn’t have a timeline for when crisis standards might be lifted in the northern Idaho district, which covers five counties and includes Kootenai Health in Coeur d’Alene. Health officials said it will take time to catch up on routine surgeries that have been put off.

Illinois

Chicago: Former President Barack Obama’s foundation said Monday that it has received a $100 million donation from Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, the largest individual contribution it has received to date. The Obama foundation said in a statement that the gift from Bezos is intended “to help expand the scope of programming that reaches emerging leaders” in the United States and around the world. The donation, it said, was also given in honor of John Lewis, the congressman and civil rights icon who died last year. As part of the gift, the foundation said Bezos has asked for the plaza at the Obama Presidential Center, under construction in Chicago’s South Side, to be named after Lewis. Valerie Jarrett, a former senior adviser to Obama who serves as the foundation’s CEO, said in a statement that the foundation was “thrilled” by that idea. Construction on Obama’s legacy project is expected to cost about $830 million and be completed by 2025. In the meantime, the foundation said it’s giving donors the opportunity to “honor and elevate the names of those who have fought for a more just and equitable world” by naming public spaces in the center. “Freedom fighters deserve a special place in the pantheon of heroes, and I can’t think of a more fitting person to honor with this gift than John Lewis, a great American leader and a man of extraordinary decency and courage,” Bezos said in the statement released by the foundation.

Indiana

Cyclist and pedestrian safety advocates gathe for a candlelight vigil Sunday at Lugar Plaza to honor the World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims and issue a call to action for Indianapolis.

Indianapolis: Biking advocates reeling from the deaths of seven people this year in collisions between vehicles and cyclists are calling for the city to do more to try to prevent such crashes. About two dozen cyclists held a moment of silence for seven minutes – one for each crash victim – at a downtown plaza Sunday evening to mark World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims. The candlelight vigil was organized by Bike Indianapolis, a nonprofit group that says seven cyclists, by its count, have received a fatal blow from a vehicle in the capital city since mid-July. “This was too many deaths,” said Sylva Zhang, Bike Indianapolis’ marketing director. In each of the previous six years, the city recorded between one and five fatal crashes with cyclists, according to the Indianapolis Metropolitan Planning Organization’s crash dashboard. Biking advocates want the city to establish a crash response team of city-county employees and independent citizens to examine crash sites involving cyclists and pedestrians and recommend preventive infrastructure and policy improvements. They also want the city to respond to those recommendations with plans and to create a database of crash data and reports immediately after they are submitted.

Iowa

Des Moines: A law that prohibits Medicaid coverage for sex reassignment surgeries for transgender Iowans violates state law and the state constitution, a judge ruled in a decision made public Monday. Judge William Kelly ordered the Iowa Department of Human Services to provide coverage for sex reassignment surgeries when ordered to treat gender dysphoria, a psychological distress that results from an incongruence between one’s sex assigned at birth and one’s gender identity. It often begins in childhood, and some people may not experience it until after puberty or much later, according to the American Psychiatric Association. About 12 states exclude the surgeries in Medicaid coverage; 18 specifically include gender-affirming care; and others do not address it. The ruling is a victory for Aiden Vasquez and Mika Covington, two residents represented by the ACLU of Iowa. Kelly said state and federal courts in the past 16 years have found that gender identity discrimination is a form of sex discrimination, which is prohibited under civil rights laws. He also found the law violated the equal protection clause of the state constitution. It is not challenged in the record that surgical treatment for gender dysphoria is a serious medical condition, and the surgery is recommended for Vasquez and Covington by medical professionals as necessary and effective, the judge said.

Kansas

Minneapolis: Dale “Duster” Hoffman didn’t want a sorrowful funeral, so instead he got a parade. KWCH-TV reports residents of the small town of Minneapolis, Kansas, turned out Sunday for a parade honoring Hoffman, who died this month at age 71. Hoffman had said he wanted his friends and family to remember him with a fun and joyful gathering. More than 100 cars took part in driving down Main Street as part of the parade. One relative said it was believed to be one of the largest parades ever in Minneapolis, a town of about 2,000 residents about 180 miles west of Kansas City, Missouri.

Kentucky

Lexington: A judge has ruled against a police union in a lawsuit that sought to stop a ban on no-knock warrants in the city. A Fayette County judge agreed Friday to dismiss a lawsuit filed by the local police union, the Lexington Herald-Leader reports. The Fraternal Order of Police Bluegrass Lodge No. 4 filed suit in July against the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government over the no-knock warrant ban it enacted following months of debate after Breonna Taylor was killed by police in Louisville during a raid at her apartment. The union said in the lawsuit that banning the warrants is unsafe and that the organization has the right to bargain on behalf of Lexington officers over changes that affect officers’ “health and safety.” Circuit Judge Kimberly Bunnell said elected officials had the right to enact public policies without bargaining. The FOP may appeal the decision, local representative said.

Louisiana

Baton Rouge: Nearly 15 months after Hurricane Laura struck, the state is kicking off $11.3 million in housing repair and rebuilding programs for the southwestern city of Lake Charles while it waits for hundreds of millions in promised federal aid to arrive. Gov. John Bel Edwards, a Democrat, and Lake Charles Mayor Nic Hunter, a Republican, announced the plans at a joint press conference Monday. The effort will be financed with federal housing and disaster recovery funds available to the state and city through various programs. The dollars largely will pay for home rehabilitation work for low- to moderate-income homeowners, with grants capped at $50,000 per household. A $1 million share of the money will help landlords rebuild housing if they are willing to rent to low- to moderate-income tenants. “The housing situation in Lake Charles is absolutely dire,” Hunter said. “This is going to help.” The city of Lake Charles will administer the program. Hunter didn’t immediately provide information on how people can apply, saying the city is still working out logistics. Edwards and Hunter acknowledged the money is nowhere near the amount needed to address the gaps in insurance coverage and blight of abandoned houses destroyed by Laura in Lake Charles alone, plus the needs of the southwestern region.

Maine

Portland: The herring fishing industry in the Northeast qualifies for federal assistance because its 2019 season has been declared a disaster. The federal government has the ability to declare a “fishery disaster” when adverse circumstances in a fishery cause economic hardship. A recent scientific assessment of the herring population found the species population has fallen, and tighter fishing quotas have made herring fishing more difficult. U.S. Secretary of Commerce Gina Raimondo announced the disaster declaration Monday. Members of the herring fishing industry will be eligible for disaster assistance, and some fishery-related businesses might also qualify for federal loans, the commerce department said. The commerce department said the allocation of money will be determined soon. Herring are economically important because they’re widely used as lobster bait, as well as for food. The species is also critical to the health of the ocean because of its role in the food chain. Herring fishermen caught more than 200 million pounds of herring as recently as 2014, but the 2019 catch was less than 25 million. The fishery is based mostly in Maine and Massachusetts.

Maryland

Sharpsburg: The vice mayor is facing federal firearms charges, authorities said. An indictment unsealed last week charges Jacob Martz, 41, with possession of a firearm by a prohibited person and possession of a machine gun in connection with 16 firearms and multiple machine-gun conversion devices found at his home, according to a U.S. Attorney’s Office news release. The indictment alleges Martz knew he was prohibited from possessing firearms due to previous felony firearms convictions, but he had 16 guns and about 5,200 rounds of ammunition on Oct. 6. It also alleges he possessed devices used to convert AR-15-style rifles into machine guns, officials said. Martz, vice mayor of Sharpsburg, a small western Maryland town, turned himself in Thursday and pleaded not guilty at an arraignment in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, defense attorney David W. Fischer said. “We intend to vigorously defend against these allegations,” Fischer said. U.S. Attorney’s Office spokeswoman Marcia Murphy said information about the investigation and what led to the charges wouldn’t be made public. Martz was released to his residence, she said. Martz faces a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison on each charge, although sentences are typically less than the maximum, officials said.

Massachusetts

Boston: Mayor Michelle Wu signed an ordinance Monday designed to divest the city from fossil fuels. The ordinance will prohibit the use of public funds from being invested in the stocks, securities or other obligations of any company that derives more than 15% of its revenue from fossil fuels. The ordinance also extends to companies deriving more than 15% of revenue from tobacco products or private prison industries. Wu, a former city councilor sworn in as mayor last week, said the move is the culmination of a years­long push to distance Boston from the fossil fuels that are helping drive the climate change that is threatening the coastal city. “This is deeply personal for many of us and urgent,” Wu said during a signing ceremony at Boston City Hall. “My older son, Blaise, was born in the first year that I served in this building and the first year that we started to hear it was the hottest year ever on record. Since then, his six years alive on this planet have each been our hottest on record. ... We’re moving quickly to make sure that Boston will set the tone for what is possible for that brightest greenest future for all of our kids.” The ordinance will pull $65 million immediately out of the fossil fuel industry, said Boston City Councilor Lydia Edwards, a supporter of the ordinance, unanimously approved by the City Council last week.

Michigan

Flint: At least one person died, and a 3-year-old child remained missing Tuesday, after an overnight explosion and fire destroyed three homes, damaged several others and sent debris falling onto a neighborhood, authorities said. Flint Fire Chief Raymond Barton said Tuesday that two people were rushed from the scene Monday night to area hospitals, where one of them – a 70-year-old man – was pronounced dead. The father of the missing child was in critical condition, Barton said. Another person reported minor injuries following the explosion, which destroyed three homes in the neighborhood on Flint’s west side, WJRT-TV reports. Barton said a Michigan State Police cadaver dog and fire crews with specialized equipment were searching for the 3-year-old. “This is a tragic time for our community,” Mayor Sheldon Neeley said during a Tuesday morning news conference. Three houses were fully engulfed in flames when firefighters arrived at the scene after 9:30 p.m. Monday. Officials said about 20 houses sustained damage, including broken windows from debris thrown across an entire block by the explosion, which was felt miles away. The cause of the explosion, which left the neighborhood littered with splintered wood and other debris, was under investigation, Neeley said.

Minnesota

Moorhead: The USDA Office of Tribal Relations announced this week that it will partner with several Native American-led organizations on projects to raise awareness of Indigenous perspectives about food and agriculture. “The United States government hasn’t always incorporated Indigenous views and values into our work. And that’s particularly true within the food and agricultural space,” said Heather Dawn Thompson, director of the Office of Tribal Relations and a member of the Cheyenne River Sioux tribe. “We’re taking this moment to rethink how the United States Department of Agriculture interacts with and thinks about Indigenous foods and Indigenous farming and ranching techniques.” Two regional seed processing centers will be created through the Minnesota-based Native American Food Sovereignty Alliance, Minnesota Public Radio News reports. USDA will help fund equipment for the facilities, one in Minnesota and one in the southwestern U.S. “Some of this equipment is quite pricey and difficult for the average producer or seed saver to acquire on their own,” Thompson said. “So these will become regional hubs that will be available to Native producers to share and use in a cooperative fashion, in order to process their seeds and save them.” Minneapolis-based North American Traditional Indigenous Food Systems will develop recipes using traditional Indigenous foods and foods provided to tribal communities through the federal Emergency Food Assistance Program, said co-founder and executive director Dana Thompson.

Mississippi

Tupelo: A post office now bears the name of an Air Force colonel who was held as a prisoner of war in Vietnam for nearly a decade. During his captivity, Carlyle “Smitty” Harris wrote a letter to his wife, Louise, that ended up at the same post office, the Daily Journal reports. It was renamed for him at a ceremony Friday. “This post office has been in our lives for about 57 years,” Harris said. He still had the letter he sent his wife and pulled it from his coat pocket as he spoke. The letter was delivered to the post office in 1965. Harris was shot down over North Vietnam on April 4 of that year and spent the next eight years as a prisoner of war. A bill to rename the post office was introduced in Congress by U.S. Rep. Trent Kelly and signed into law by President Joe Biden in August.

Missouri

St. Louis: A former police officer convicted of beating a Black undercover detective during a 2017 racial injustice protest has been sentenced to one year and one day in prison – far more lenient than prosecutors and the victim had sought. Dustin Boone was sentenced Monday in U.S. District Court after being convicted in June of a federal civil rights violation related to the attack on Luther Hall. Boone, 37, was one of five white officers charged in the beating. Boone’s sentence was less even than his own lawyers requested. While prosecutors sought a 10-year sentence, defense lawyers asked U.S. District Judge E. Richard Webber to sentence Boone to 26 months. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports the sentence appeared to stun Hall, his relatives and his supporters, who walked out of the courtroom before Webber finished pronouncing the sentence. They declined comment after the hearing, as did prosecutors. Hall, in a statement to Webber before the sentence was announced, said he thought Webber’s sentencing of two other officers charged in the case was too lenient, “leniency that’s not shown to African American defendants.” Boone’s attorneys had argued that he did not participate in the initial Sept. 17, 2017, beating and held Hall down only because other officers were “acting as though” they were making an arrest.

Montana

Helena: An investigation into a complaint that public officials tried to intimidate hospital employees into treating a COVID-19 patient with unapproved medications uncovered a voicemail left by a former state senator in which she said she didn’t think “senators would be too happy to hear about” the hospital’s care of the patient. Jennifer Fielder, now a member of the Public Service Commission, told the Legislature’s special counsel she left the voicemail with St. Peter’s Health on Oct. 11 as a personal matter on behalf of the patient, whom she described as a friend. Senate Minority Leader Jill Cohenour argued Tuesday that if Fielder were leaving a personal message, she wouldn’t have identified herself as a senator in the call. Attorney General Austin Knudsen has acknowledged he intervened in the case and later said Chief Deputy Attorney General Kristen Hansen brought the issue to him, but he denied intimidating anyone. In Fielder’s voicemail, she identified herself as a state senator, and later a former state senator, and said the patient was a Senate staffer. The patient previously served as a temporary state Senate staffer and was not working for the Legislature at the time of her hospitalization, according to the special counsel Abra Belke’s report, released Monday night. The patient, who was admitted to the hospital Oct. 9, died Oct. 26. She was 82.

Nebraska

Lincoln: Gov. Pete Ricketts railed Monday against the chancellor of the University of Nebraska’s flagship campus, saying he was misled about a plan designed to address racial disparities on campus, even as the university system’s president tried to deescalate the situation. Ricketts said he has “lost all faith” in University of Nebraska-Lincoln Chancellor Ronnie Green, who has endorsed the plan as a way to make the campus more diverse and inclusive. Ricketts said Green told him the plan was an effort to increase the number of minority faculty, staff and students on campus, which Ricketts said was “a good thing.” But he said Green didn’t tell him about other parts of the initiative, including a “call to action” statement that says structural racism in society is the cause of disparities between races and isn’t limited to individual beliefs or actions. The statement says the plan is intended to transform the university into a place where every person matters and gets “equitable outcomes.” The Republican governor has blasted the idea as “ideological indoctrination” that will encourage people to see each other through the lens of race instead of as individuals with unique strengths. Just hours before Ricketts spoke, University of Nebraska President Ted Carter released an open letter in support of the plan. “These are uncomfortable conversations, with passionate opinions on many sides,” he said. “Not every Nebraskan, not every member of the university community, will agree with every element of the plan.”

Nevada

Las Vegas: Two Las Vegas-area elected officials are using the same word, “scary,” to describe weekend demonstrations outside their homes involving people expressing opposition to government COVID-19 vaccine and mask mandates. “The scary thing – it was dark, and I couldn’t really see what was going on out there,” Clark County Commissioner Tick Segerblom told the Las Vegas Review-Journal. Segerblom, a Democrat, said Monday that about 20 protesters stayed about two hours outside his home Sunday, holding flags, honking and speaking into bullhorns. He said one repeated chant was: “No mask, no vax.” Outside Clark County School District Board President Linda Cavazos’ home in Henderson, as many as 40 demonstrators showed up about 4:30 p.m. and stayed for about two hours, Clark County School District Police Lt. Bryan Zink said. In photos provided by Cavazos, people can be seen carrying American flags, a yellow “Don’t tread on me” flag and a banner reading, “Let’s go, Brandon” – a term that has become code for a vulgar insult against President Joe Biden. Another man is draped in what appears to be a Confederate flag. Cavazos described the demonstration as “just scary.” “It’s more like bullying,” Cavazos said. “It’s more like intimidation. It’s just not OK.”

New Hampshire

Concord: The state is getting more than $8.3 million to support marketing, workforce and other projects to boost business and travel. The funding was allocated through the American Rescue Plan. The state’s congressional delegation announced the funds last week. “Travel and tourism are core industries that fuel local economies across New Hampshire – these sectors are key to our state’s recovery following the pandemic,” U.S. Sen. Jeanne Shaheen said in a statement. The grant comes from the Commerce Department’s Economic Development Administration, which makes investments in economically distressed communities in order to create jobs, promote innovation and accelerate long-term sustainable economic growth.

New Jersey

Newark: The state has moved closer to withdrawing from a bi-state commission formed to monitor corruption at the New York region’s ports. The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to hear a lawsuit filed by the Waterfront Commission of New York Harbor that had sought to block New Jersey’s move. If the state of New York doesn’t step in to file a legal challenge, the commission would effectively be dissolved. The commission was formed in the 1950s to combat entrenched organized crime influences at the ports. But in recent years, New Jersey has contended that organized crime has largely been driven out of the ports and that the commission was impeding job growth by over-regulating businesses there and making hiring more difficult. Under New Jersey’s plan, state police would take over investigating criminal activity at the ports. The New York-New Jersey port system, among the busiest in the country, includes container terminals in Newark, Elizabeth and Bayonne in New Jersey, as well as Staten Island and Brooklyn in New York. The New Jersey terminals handle the bulk of the port’s business. “The Governor is pleased with the Supreme Court’s decision to reject the Waterfront Commission’s appeal,” Michael Zhadanovsky, a spokesperson for Gov. Phil Murphy, said in an email Tuesday.

New Mexico

Albuquerque: Major repairs to a northern New Mexico dam will mean irrigation water will have to be stored elsewhere. Repairs on El Vado Dam are slated to start next spring, leaving it unusable for at least a year to deliver water to the Middle Rio Grande Valley, said Page Pegram of the New Mexico Interstate Stream Commission. Abiquiu Lake most likely will be the backup, Pegram told the Albuquerque Journal. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation plans to address cracks in El Vado’s steel faceplate and the foundation, as well as the deteriorating spillway. The dam was built in the 1930s, and its current condition isn’t safe for the public, the agency said. El Vado Dam can hold back about 60 billion gallons of water, but the capacity will be reduced significantly while the repairs are being done. Persistent drought also has meant less water in New Mexico reservoirs, and the region could be in store for a dry winter with a La Niña weather pattern. “Water supply conditions for the Middle Rio Grande in 2022 are expected to be significantly diminished,” Pegram said. “We expect stream flows in the basin to remain below average.”

New York

Albany: The state is facing calls from faculty to boost its public university system by launching a university endowment – a step dozens of other states have taken. Lawmakers on the state Senate higher education committee held a hearing Monday as part of the ongoing budget process. New York’s economy is still rebounding from the COVID-19 pandemic, but the state is facing demands for increased spending at a time when tax collections are strong. The state’s general fund as of September was $4.5 billion higher than the previous September. It’s time for New York to allocate $150 million in additional aid to state-operated campuses, said Frederick Kowal, president of the United University Professions union, which represents more than 37,000 academic and professional faculty. Kowal told lawmakers that New York flat-funded higher education and increased the state’s reliance on students’ tuition and fees under former Gov. Andrew Cuomo. “The abandonment of our public higher education system has directly led to drops in enrollment,” Kowal said. And he said an endowment would provide a long-term funding resource to rebuild “depleted” academic departments and hire and promote a more diverse workforce.

North Carolina

Raleigh: Gov. Roy Cooper approved a measure Tuesday for a new governing structure for high school sports. The new law allows the State Board of Education to create a formal agreement with the North Carolina High School Athletic Association, the nonprofit body currently governing high school athletics. Under the compromise legislation, the State Board of Education can now reach a memorandum of understanding with the group to administer and enforce the education board’s requirements for high school sports. The deal needs to be reached by March 15 and last an initial four years. “For months, we worked tirelessly to determine the best governing structure that supports our student-athletes and is transparent and accountable,” said a statement from state Sen. Vickie Sawyer, an Iredell County Republican who helped craft the bipartisan bill. “After productive conversations with the NCHSAA, State Board of Education, Governor’s Office, and our Democratic colleagues, we’ve established a clear path forward. I want to thank Gov. Cooper for signing this bill into law.” While state education officials must adopt student participation rules, they can delegate rules on items like school penalties and participation fees to the association, which currently represents more than 400 schools.

North Dakota

Bismarck: The state Game and Fish Department on Monday unveiled a plan to bring landowners, conservation groups, scientists and others together to restore native grasslands. The agency said North Dakota has lost more than 70% of its native prairie, which is essential for wildlife, pollinators, ranching operations and communities. About 60% of the nearly 5 million wetland acres in the state have been converted or lost. “When we talk about native prairie in the state, we need to acknowledge who the owners and managers of our native prairie are,” said Greg Link, the department’s conservation and communications division chief. “In most cases, we’re talking about ranchers and producers who run livestock on that prairie.” The so-called Meadowlark Initiative is named after the official state bird, known for its unique song. The western meadowlark populations in North Dakota are continuing to decline, wildlife officials said. The program allows producers to plant marginal cropland back to diverse native perennial grasslands for grazing. Funding is available to establish the grass and install grazing infrastructure, such as fencing and water. Producers also are eligible to receive rental payments for the first three years as the land transitions from cropland to grazing land.

Ohio

Cleveland: CVS, Walgreens and Walmart pharmacies recklessly distributed massive amounts of pain pills in two Ohio counties, a federal jury said Tuesday in a verdict that could set the tone for city and county governments across the country that want to hold pharmacies accountable for their roles in the opioid crisis. Lake and Trumbull counties blamed the three chain pharmacies for not stopping the flood of pills that caused hundreds of overdose deaths and cost each of the two counties about $1 billion, their attorney said. How much the pharmacies must pay in damages will be decided in the spring by a federal judge. It was the first time pharmacy companies had completed a trial to defend themselves in a drug crisis that has killed a half-million Americans over the past two decades. The counties were able to convince the jury that the pharmacies played an outsized role in creating a public nuisance in the way they dispensed pain medication into their communities. “The law requires pharmacies to be diligent in dealing drugs. This case should be a wake-up call that failure will not be accepted,” said Mark Lanier, an attorney for the counties. Spokespeople for CVSHealth and Walgreen Co. said the companies disagree with the verdict and will appeal. Two other chains, Rite Aid and Giant Eagle, already had settled lawsuits with the counties.

Oklahoma

Oklahoma City: Gov. Kevin Stitt on Monday signed into law newly drawn maps for the state’s five congressional and 149 state House and Senate districts. The bills, approved by the Republican-controlled Legislature during a special session last week, contain the new district boundaries that will be in place for the next 10 years. The new maps had to reapportion the state’s population, which has continued shifting from rural communities to urban and suburban areas. Democrats strongly opposed the newly drawn 5th Congressional District, which has been competitive in recent years, with Democrats winning the seat as recently as 2018 before Republicans won it back last year. The new map moves Democratic portions of Oklahoma City’s core and south side into the heavily Republican 3rd Congressional District that stretches across western and northwestern Oklahoma. Andy Moore, executive director of the group People Not Politicians, which tried unsuccessfully to shift the responsibility of drawing the new maps from the Legislature to a bipartisan commission, said the new maps were a clear example of gerrymandering. “We are disappointed that the Legislature adopted a congressional map that was drawn in secret, divides communities and prioritizes politics over what’s best for Oklahoma voters,” he said in a statement.

Oregon

Portland: As COVID-19 cases in the state continue to decrease, health officials announced Tuesday that they are immediately lifting statewide mask requirements in crowded outdoor settings. Oregon was the first state in the U.S. to reimplement an outdoor mask mandate for both vaccinated and unvaccinated residents in August as the delta variant of the coronavirus spread. At the time, Oregon was in the midst of its worst surge during the pandemic. Record daily COVID-19 cases were set day after day, and hospitalizations overwhelmed the health system. A majority of people hospitalized were unvaccinated. However, over the past six weeks, health officials say Oregon’s daily COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations have steadily declined. Last week, cases decreased by 12% from the previous week. “We took decisive measures. And, as has been the case over the course of this pandemic, Oregonians resoundingly responded,” Patrick Allen, director of the Oregon Health Authority, said Tuesday. “Together we have managed to turn back the tsunami of new infections that very nearly swamped our health care system.” Oregon has had some of the strictest statewide coronavirus-related restrictions and safety measures during the pandemic.

Pennsylvania

Philadelphia: Eight civilian Philadelphia Police Department employees were indicted on charges of collecting Pandemic Unemployment Assistance to which they were not entitled because they remained employed. Seven of the employees are dispatchers, and one is a clerk. A federal grand jury returned an indictment charging them with theft of government funds, wire fraud and mail fraud. The accused took advantage of a system that was designed to aid people left unemployed because of the pandemic, prosecutors said. Each allegedly submitted weekly certifications stating that they were not employed and were ready, willing and able to work each day, prosecutors said. According to the indictment, those statements were false because each was employed by the police department. Prosecutors said the employees received assistance funds for multiple weeks while also collecting a salary from the city. Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw on Tuesday said she will suspend them for 30 days with the intent to dismiss them at the end of the 30 days upon completion of arrest procedures.

Rhode Island

Providence: The state has been awarded an $81.7 million federal grant for the state health department to build a new public health laboratory. Rhode Island’s congressional delegation announced the new federal Epidemiology and Laboratory Capacity grant, saying the current facility, commissioned in 1978, has insufficient laboratory space, inadequate building systems and broken equipment, and the state spends more than $500,000 annually to keep it working efficiently. The state health laboratories work to investigate and mitigate life-threatening diseases, including COVID-19, eastern equine encephalitis, Ebola, H1N1 and Zika. Last year, when commercial testing services weren’t yet widely available, the number of coronavirus samples that could be tested was limited due to insufficient laboratory space, the delegation said. “COVID-19 revealed a serious gap in our health care infrastructure. This new federal funding will help Rhode Island bridge that gap and create a new state-of-the-art lab facility for the 21st century,” U.S. Sens. Jack Reed and Sheldon Whitehouse and U.S. Reps. Jim Langevin and David Cicilline said in a joint statement. The state health laboratories also work with state and municipal agencies to ensure the safety of drinking water and food, monitor water and air pollution, and help public safety and criminal investigations through police officer training, DNA testing and drug identification.

South Carolina

Columbia: State health and education officials want students to come up with a short song to encourage people to get COVID-19 vaccines. The winning jingle will get the winner’s school $10,000 toward music programs and be recorded and featured in statewide radio advertisements in 2022. Individual students, classes or groups can all compete in the Sing It to Win It campaign. The deadline is Jan. 31, officials said. Five finalists will be chosen and put up for a vote on both the state Department of Education and state Department of Health and Environmental Control’s social media accounts. A $5,000 second place and $3,000 third place prize will also be awarded to a school.

South Dakota

Sioux Falls: Marcella Rose LeBeau, an Army nurse who was honored for her service during World War II and leadership in the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, has died. She was 102. Family members said she “passed on to journey to the next world” late Sunday in Eagle Butte after experiencing problems with her digestive system and losing her appetite. LeBeau had remained active all of her life and earlier this month traveled to Oklahoma for a ceremony honoring her induction into the National Native American Hall of Fame. Her daughter, Gerri Lebeau, said the matriarch of her family demonstrated fortitude, as well as an ability to seek healing, as she overcame the abuses she faced at an Indian boarding school during her youth. She went on to treat front-line soldiers as an Army nurse in Europe during the Allied invasion of Normandy. After returning home, she became an outspoken advocate for health in the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe. “She was the foundation of our family,” said her grandson Ryman LeBeau. “She had a lifetime of good things that she had accomplished.” Lebeau was born in 1919 and grew up in Promise, South Dakota, as a member of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe. Her mother died when she was 10 years old, and her grandmother gave her the name Wigmunke’ Waste Win’, or Pretty Rainbow Woman. But LeBeau grew up at a time when the government was attempting to eradicate her culture – while her grandmother only spoke the Lakota language, she could be punished for speaking it at the boarding school.

Tennessee

Nashville: A historically Black medical college is giving students an early Thanksgiving gift – $10,000 in cash. Meharry Medical College President James E.K. Hildreth announced the gift Monday, telling students they would receive it Wednesday. The money comes from the Higher Education Emergency Relief Fund, part of a federal coronavirus aid package. Schools across the country have used their money to wipe out student debts, offer free tuition and give cash grants such as the one at Meharry. In a video message to the Nashville school’s 956 students, Hildreth said they can manage their money however they choose, but he strongly urged them to use it for their education and training. Rising senior Benson Joseph said he is still deciding how to use his gift, but he will definitely set a portion aside to help cover travel expenses when he interviews for residency programs next year and other expenses financial aid does not cover. “It feels like Christmas came a little bit early,” said Joseph, who plans to pursue neurosurgery. “The last two years have been quite a trial for a lot of us.” Hildreth said in the video announcement that he is thankful for those who work at Meharry and those who support the college with their resources. “But mostly, I’m thankful for you students and the future of health care that is entrusted to you,” he said.

Texas

Dallas: Students at a suburban high school are planning more demonstrations after four students were arrested last week at a protest against the school’s response to allegations of sexual harassment. Hundreds of students decided to walk out of their classes at Little Elm High School on Friday morning after a sophomore publicly accused a freshman of sexually harassing and abusing her. The sophomore’s friend posted on social media that she had reported the abuse to the school’s administration. The friend alleged the administration then suspended the sophomore for three days for falsely accusing the freshman, according to the post. In a joint statement with Little Elm Mayor Curtis Cornelious, Little Elm Superintendent Daniel Gallagher said the school’s investigation of the alleged abuse did not find sufficient evidence of a crime. He denied allegations the student received disciplinary action for reporting the harassment. Another junior, Kailey Heaton, said things turned violent when police officers attempted to corral the protesting students by linking arms. Heaton said the officers began attempting to push the teens back, but students eventually broke through the line. Videos widely shared on social media show officers forcibly holding a student on the ground while arresting him. Others show two officers pepper-spraying one student and firing their Tasers at him. Cornelious said in a video statement on Facebook that officers were justified in their use of force against the students.

Utah

"The Bluest Eye" by Toni Morrison

Salt Lake City: The American Civil Liberties Union of Utah is investigating complaints related to the removal of several books from high school library shelves after a parent complaint. The Canyons School District appears to have disregarded its own policy for responding to such complaints by pulling nine books off the shelves, including “The Bluest Eye” by Toni Morrison, before completing a full review, the organization said in a statement. The removals came after a parent of younger students in the district emailed about what she called sexually explicit material in several titles that she learned about from social media, KSL.com reports. She told the outlet she had asked for them to be reviewed for content, not necessarily pulled. The Canyons policy states that books should remain in use until a full review of any challenged material is complete. In this case, nine books were removed from shelves in four high schools while a review was still in process. District spokesman Jeff Haney has said the district decided to pull the books off the shelves of the school libraries while district officials review the policy itself, which also says that challenges to library materials cannot come from outside a school community. In a statement to KSL.com, he framed the district’s action as a “review for content.”

Vermont

Montpelier: Gov. Phil Scott signed into law Tuesday a bill that will allow the state’s municipalities to adopt temporary indoor mask mandates. Scott’s signature came a day after the Legislature held a special session in which the new law that allows a municipality to impose its own mask was introduced and approved. Scott said he called the special session at the request of the Vermont League of Cities and Towns as a compromise after some lawmakers urged him to reimpose a statewide mask mandate. “As you’ve heard me say repeatedly, masking when inside in public spaces is a good idea right now because masks work, but at this point in the pandemic, mandates won’t,” Scott said. “And I think they’ll be divisive and counterproductive.” Within hours of the new law taking effect, Burlington Mayor Miro Weinberger said he would propose requiring facial coverings in indoor public settings except for situations in which all employees and customers in city businesses are verified to be vaccinated against COVID-19. The ordinance will go before the Burlington City Council on Dec. 1.

Virginia

Richmond: A hospital has seen a surge in cases of a coronavirus-related complication in children, officials said. The Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU said 15 kids were hospitalized at the same time last month with a rare inflammatory condition in children linked with the virus, WRIC-TV reports. It was the hospital’s highest peak since the pandemic started, officials said. Previously, it had two or three children hospitalized with the condition at a time. Dr. Tiffany Kimbrough, director of the hospital’s Mother-Infant Unit, said the hospital has seen 50 cases since the pandemic began. The condition can occur two to six weeks after a child recovers from a mild or asymptomatic battle with COVID-19. Kids get symptoms like fever, trouble breathing, abdominal pain and vomiting “and can progress to full shock very quickly,” Kimbrough said. No children with the condition have died on the hospital’s watch, she said. Among the cases the facility has seen, a majority of the children affected are kids of color, she said. Despite the “concerning” numbers last month, Kimbrough said health workers are hopeful that as more children get vaccinated against COVID-19, they will see fewer infections in that age group.

Washington

Seattle: The City Council has approved a 2022 budget that cuts police department spending from previous years, drawing criticism from people who say city voters earlier this month endorsed more spending on public safety. In an 8-1 vote Monday, the council approved a $355.5 million budget for the department, saying there are no cuts functionally for the Seattle Police Department. KOMO reports the budget includes funds to hire 125 officers in 2022. But the police department’s budget is smaller compared to years past. In 2021 the budget was $363 million, and in 2020 it was $401.8 million. Outgoing Mayor Jenny Durkan criticized the new spending plan. “Every time council acts, they’re telling officers that are here today if they’re valued or not,” Durkan said. “Mayor-elect Harrell ran on adding more officers, and I’m trying to set him up for success as much as I can.” Bruce Harrell easily won the race for Seattle mayor, running on a platform of increased spending on police services and criticizing opponents who advocated “defunding” the police. The new budget includes funds for 1,357 officers, and SPD reports currently having 1,120 officers on the force, which leaves 237 open jobs.

West Virginia

Snowshoe: A ski resort is opening some of its trails to the public on Thanksgiving. Snowshoe Mountain said it will start the ski season for the general public Thursday with a limited number of trails. The resort also will be open Wednesday to passholders and anyone who already purchased lift tickets for that day. The Pocahontas County facility will have 30 acres of available terrain to skiers and snowboarders with three lifts operating, the West Virginia Ski Areas Association said in a news release. Ski operations at Timberline resort could start as early as the weekend, while Canaan Valley and Winterplace resorts are scheduled to begin in the middle of next month, the statement said. Visitors are asked to check with individual resorts for COVID-19 safety requirements. The association again this year is offering a program that will let children in fourth and fifth grades ski or snowboard for free. Under the program, up to three junior lift tickets and one rental will be allowed at participating resorts during the 2021-22 season, the statement said. West Virginia resorts draw more than 800,000 skier visits a year, typically luring visitors from Virginia, North Carolina, Ohio and Florida. The ski and snowboard season traditionally runs through late March, weather permitting.

Wisconsin

Madison: Cities are looking for ways to care for an increased number of people experiencing homelessness this winter. Joe Volk, executive director of the Wisconsin Coalition Against Homelessness, said communities across the state have been allocating money to increase services for unsheltered people. He said much of the funding has come from federal pandemic recovery aid, often being used to provide hotel rooms and other temporary housing. Volk said there are more people experiencing homelessness this fall than prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, including families with children, Wisconsin Public Radio reports. “We’ve been through an unimaginable year and a half of social and economic disruption,” Volk said. “Certainly things would probably be a lot worse if the federal government hadn’t stepped in.” But he said that “a certain number of those folks are going to fall through the cracks and become homeless.” The La Crosse City Council has voted to allocate $700,000 to fund a temporary winter shelter from November to March. In Madison, city officials have been working to relocate people living in tents at a local park to a new city-owned encampment. The site has 30 prefabricated shelters with heating and electricity, as well as bathroom facilities and on-site support staff from local nonprofits.

Wyoming

Laramie: A student team at the University of Wyoming has been awarded $100,000 for its work on technology to track carbon in soil as part of efforts to help capture and store greenhouse gases, the Casper Star-Tribune reports.

From USA TODAY Network and wire reports

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Indigenous food, boycott anniversary: News from around our 50 states

Источник: https://finance.yahoo.com/news/indigenous-food-boycott-anniversary-herring-201547757.html

Why the Republican Party wins when robots take your job

Research suggests that job automation is only a matter of time. Here's why the American right will benefit.

By Ilia Blinderman

i. Me and you and everyone we know

One evening in late July of last year, as a friend’s birthday celebration wore on and the night steadily progressed from wine to beer, the conversation turned to Uber. We’d trotted out the usual talking points: the ossified taxi industry was about to face the same fate that befell horse and buggy drivers; driverless cars were the future. The rising tide of progress, we observed with some regret, doesn't always lift all boats; while many would win as a result of automation, drivers would lose.

With the coming presidential election a constant presence in the backs of our minds, I remember arriving at an alarming thought amidst the banter: what would happen politically if the other jobs that allowed millions of people to earn a middle-class living — without the need to attend college — went the way of the taxi drivers? If broad support for outsiders like Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump was brewing when the economy was strong, I wondered, what would happen if countless workers were made redundant? I decided to turn to the data.

While machines tended to replace manual labour throughout the past century, computers today devise new ways of predicting earthquakes based on imperceptibly slight audio patterns, and identify tumors in x-rays better than their human counterparts. It’s not far-fetched to worry that machines may render vast swaths of the job market obsolete.

Which jobs are most likely to vanish in the near future? In 2013, Oxford University’s Carl Frey and Michael Osborne broke down the individual tasks that make up hundreds of occupations, and assessed the probability that each of these will be automated (for a rundown of their methodology, check the bottom of the page).

Curious to see if your accounting major is going to end up being a viable long-term career choice (spoiler: unlikely)? Or, should you take on nursing, or perhaps become a teacher? Check the chart below (circle sizes represent the number of Americans in these occupations as of 2015):

If you’re in a career that involves a good deal of social perceptiveness, such as a healthcare social worker or a speech language pathologist (both at < 1% likelihood of automation), there's little need to worry about automation. If your days are spent filled with repetitive, manual tasks, however, such as those of telemarketers or data entry clerks, the prospects of long-term employment in your field are discouraging.

Most of us fall somewhere in between those two extremes, and may be happy enough knowing that robots won’t be stealing our jobs quite yet (here’s looking at you, 601,000 medical assistants). Nonetheless, there’s a an unnerving takeaway here: if only the top 15% of the most vulnerable occupations disappear, over 50 million people risk being out of work. These jobs, of course, won’t vanish all at once; neither will automation eliminate professions altogether, but dull and hone the importance of human involvement in particular tasks as technology progresses. Bearing these caveats in mind, however, yields little comfort: if even a small number of these occupations disappear completely, and substitutes fail to arise in time, the impact on civil society is likely to be colossal.

ii. The 85%-ers

Considering the number of people who are liable to lose their jobs with few alternatives, I began to wonder where the greatest impact would be felt. To find out, I looked at where highly automatable jobs — those with an 85% likelihood of automation — are concentrated.

Why the 85% cutoff? For months, I’ve been thinking about a map which showed truck drivers — who have a 79% chance of becoming automated — to be the most popular job in over 20 states. Truckers make up over 1% of the U.S. working population, and driving rigs is one of the few options for people with no college education to make a decent, middle-class income. Considering their ubiquity, one begins to wonder what would happen if their numbers were, say, reduced by even a tenth in a short period. That’s altogether likely: in October of 2016, a self-driving truck made the 100+ mile highway leg of its delivery trip to bring 50,000 beers from Fort Collins, CO, to Colorado Springs. If truck drivers’ jobs were so close to being automated, limiting my analyses to jobs with an even higher, 85% automation likelihood, struck me as a more conservative way to assess realistic job loss.

Below is a map of the proportion of jobs that would be lost in each county if these highly automatable occupations were to disappear.

Hover over the legend to see all counties with likely similar job losses, or find your county to see what proportion of its jobs are likely to become robo-jobs in the future:

WHERE WILL HIGHLY AUTOMATABLE JOBS BE LOST?

Counties where jobs are most likely to be lost

Were jobs with a high risk of automation to vanish, a staggering number of people in nearly every county in America would be out of a job. Even in the northeast, where states can be expected to be somewhat less affected, many counties would lose nearly 30% of jobs.

The larger question, however, remained: what does this mean politically?

iii. The White Drift Right

In light of America’s governmental volatility in 2017, I naturally wondered how the loss of an inordinate number of jobs to automation would impact the country’s biggest political contest — the presidential election. All other things being equal, then, would the Republicans or the Democrats benefit?

Although there’s little research on the political effects of automation in the current era, an unusual paper by David Autor, David Dorn, Gordon Hanson, and Kaveh Majlesi emerged in December 2016, entitled “Importing Political Polarization? The Electoral Consequences of Rising Trade Exposure.” The authors carefully explored the political impact of America opening its borders to trade with China, and unearthed a critical finding:

When trade adversely affected employment prospects in white areas, voters reacted by veering to the right, electing conservative Republicans. Conversely, in predominantly non-white districts, voters were much more likely to elect progressive Democrats. The political shift from the center to the extremes was clear.

If voters react to their jobs being usurped by robots in similar ways as they did to Chinese economic competition, what impact will this have on presidential races? To answer this, I looked at the number of white and non-white workers with highly automatable jobs (i.e., with an 85% likelihood of becoming automated) in each state.

POLITICAL IMPACT

How automation helps the Republican Party

These trends are neither predictive, nor isolated from a myriad of other, perhaps more impactful, factors, such as candidate appeal and the state of the economy. Nevertheless, the more I considered the impact of job automation in the context of the current political climate, the more I thought of Kurt Vonnegut’s first novel, The Player Piano (1952), wherein automation has rendered human workers obsolete. At one point, the protagonist, a well-off factor manager, happens upon the leader of an anti-automation resistance group, who declares,

“Things, gentlemen, are ripe for a phony Messiah, and when he comes, it's sure to be a bloody business… Sooner or later someone's going to catch the imagination of these people with some new magic. At the bottom of it will be a promise of regaining the feeling of participation, the feeling of being needed on earth — hell, dignity.”

In light of the current political fervor, such forecasts seem all too prescient.

Methodology and Data Sources: The first visualization relied on Frey and Osborne's study of the likelihoods that various careers will be automated, and the BLS' figures for employment in 2015. Frey and Osborne employed a novel methodology in order to create their list of automation likelihoods: after breaking down 702 occupations into tasks, they compiled a list of 70 careers whose automation likelihood they judged as either certain (probability of 1) or completely unlikely (probability of 0). They then used a machine learning algorithm to classify the automation likelihood of the tasks in the remaining jobs.

The second visualization, depicting county-based job loss likelihood, was compiled using a PUMA to county crosswalk compiled by The University of Michigan's Population Studies Center. It employed Frey and Osborne's job classifications, paired with U.S. Census Data on county-based employment, sourced from IPUMS, from 2011. This was the final year during which the PUMA code crosswalk was available prior to the redrawing of PUMA boundaries.

The third visualization entailed the aggregation of state-level jobs by race (I counted non-Hispanic White individuals as White and all others as non-White), and relied on the same U.S. Census Data as used in the second portion of the piece.

Источник: https://pudding.cool/2017/07/jobs

Watchdog Lebanon Home Page

Indiana is one of the states that does have a central online repository for searching historical newspapers. Several states use the Library of Congress Chronicling America site as their main central online site for searching old newspapers. Indiana does have many online newspapers available on that site as well as their own central site. Indiana also has its online availability from several other different websites as well. Many are free and many require a subscription. Below is a list of where the titles are stored and the link so that you can access them. 

There are over 4,700 newspapers that have been published in the Hoosier State.  But there are quite a few that are indeed available. So go for it – find your Indiana ancestors and all the interesting articles that capture the stories of their lives. 

Please note that I have not always entered the dates that are included in the collections, as I suspect they will change as more items are digitized. Also I suspect that some of these links may change over time – so if there is a dead link – please use your favorite search engine to find their new location. 

(Updated November 2021; recently added links are in BOLD)

Free Sites:

Statewide Collections:

Chronicling America – Indiana

  • Brookville, Ind., 1833-1861 – Indiana American.
  • Brookville, Ind., 1858-1861 – Brookville American.
  • Brookville, Ind., 1865-1872 – Indiana American.
  • Evansville, Ia. [i.e. Ind.], 1847-188? – Tri-weekly journal.
  • Evansville, Ia. [i.e. Ind.], 1848-1862 – The Evansville daily journal.
  • Evansville, Ind., 1834-184? – The Evansville journal.
  • Evansville, Ind., 184?-18?? – Evansville weekly journal.
  • Evansville, Ind., 1862-1863 – The daily Evansville journal.
  • Evansville, Ind., 1863-1866 – Evansville daily journal.
  • Evansville, Ind., 1866-1870 – The Evansville journal.
  • Evansville, Ind., 1870-1875 – The Evansville daily journal.
  • Hammond, Ind., 1906-1933 – The Lake County times.
  • Indianapolis [Ind.], 1841-1853 – Indiana State sentinel.
  • Indianapolis [Ind.], 1845-1851 – Indiana State sentinel.
  • Indianapolis [Ind.], 1853-1861 – Weekly Indiana State sentinel.
  • Indianapolis [Ind.], 1867-1904 – The Indianapolis journal.
  • Indianapolis [Ind.], 1868-1895 – The Indiana State sentinel.
  • Indianapolis, 1841-1853 – Indiana State sentinel. [volume]
  • Indianapolis, 1868-1895 – The Indiana State sentinel. [volume]
  • Indianapolis, Ind., 1861-1865 – Daily State sentinel.
  • Indianapolis, Ind., 1861-1865 – Indiana State sentinel.
  • Indianapolis, Ind., 1865-1868 – The Indianapolis daily herald.
  • Indianapolis, Ind., 1878-1907 – Indiana tribüne.
  • Indianapolis, Ind., 1879-1890 – The Indianapolis leader.
  • Indianapolis, Ind., 1880-1904 – The Indianapolis sentinel.
  • Jasper, Ind., 1858-1922 – The Jasper weekly courier.
  • Louisville, Ky., 1904-???? – Ohio valley worker : official paper of the Federated Trades Council of Louisville, Trades and Labor Council of New Albany, Central Labor Union of Jeffersonville.
  • Plymouth, Ind., 1855-1856 – Plymouth weekly banner.
  • Plymouth, Ind., 1855-1859 – Marshall County Democrat.
  • Plymouth, Ind., 1856-1878 – Marshall County Republican.
  • Plymouth, Ind., 1860-1869 – The Plymouth weekly Democrat.
  • Plymouth, Ind., 1869-1941 – The Plymouth Democrat.
  • Plymouth, Ind., 1878-1901 – The Plymouth Republican.
  • Plymouth, Ind., 1901-1911 – The Plymouth tribune.
  • Plymouth, Ind., 1911-1922 – The weekly Republican.
  • Plymouth, Marshall County, Ind., 1851-1852 – The Plymouth pilot.
  • Plymouth, Marshall County, Ind., 1852-1855 – Plymouth banner.
  • Plymouth, Marshall County, Ind., 1894-1895 – Marshall County independent.
  • Plymouth, Marshall County, Ind., 1895-1897 – Semi-weekly independent.
  • Plymouth, Marshall County, Ind., 1897-1902 – Marshall County independent.
  • Richmond, IA [i.e. Ind.], 1839-1854 – Richmond palladium.
  • Richmond, Ind., 1837-1839 – Richmond Indiana palladium.
  • Richmond, Ind., 1854-1855 – The Richmond Indiana palladium.
  • Richmond, Ind., 1855-1875 – The Richmond palladium.
  • Richmond, Ind., 1875-1905 – Richmond weekly palladium.
  • Richmond, Ind., 1876-1904 – Richmond daily palladium.
  • Richmond, Ind., 1904-1905 – The daily palladium.
  • Richmond, Ind., 1905-1906 – Richmond daily palladium.
  • Richmond, Ind., 1906-1907 – The Richmond palladium.
  • Richmond, Ind., 1907-1939 – The Richmond palladium and sun-telegram.
  • Richmond, Wayne County, Ind., 1831-1837 – Richmond palladium.
  • South Bend, Ind., 1913-1938 – South Bend news-times.
  • Terre-Haute, Ind., 1857-1867 – The daily Wabash express.
  • Terre-Haute, Vigo County, Ind., 1841-186? – Wabash express.
  • Winchester, Ind., 18??-1920 – The Winchester journal.
  • Winchester, Ind., 1862-1862 – Randolph journal.
  • Winchester, Ind., 1862-1863 – Winchester journal.
  • Winchester, Ind., 1864-1865 – Randolph County journal.
  • Winchester, Ind., 1865-186? – Randolph journal.
  • Winchester, Randolph County, Ind., 1855-1862 – Randolph County journal.

Google News Archive

Hoosier State Chronicles

  • Banner Graphic (Greencastle, Putnam County; 1 March 1973 – 31 December 1974)
  • Bedford Independent (Bedford, Lawrence County; 3 April 1856 – 19 August 1857)
  • Bloomington Courier (Bloomington, Monroe County; 8 January 1881 – 20 September 1895)
  • Bloomington Daily Telephone (Bloomington, Monroe County; 14 November 1932 – 31 December 1932)
  • Bloomington Post (Bloomington, Monroe County; 6 November 1835 – 22 March 1839)
  • Bloomington Progress (Bloomington, Monroe County; 19 May 1869 – 9 March 1900)
  • Bloomington Republican (Bloomington, Monroe County; 6 January 1827 – 3 November 1827)
  • Bloomington Telephone (Bloomington, Monroe County; 13 December 1879 – 29 December 1893)
  • Brookville American (Brookville, Franklin County; 19 February 1858 – 21 December 1860)
  • Brookville Inquirer (Brookville, Franklin County; 23 October 1824 – 21 June 1833)
  • Brown County Banner (Nashville, Brown County; 18 August 1898 – 10 November 1898)
  • Brown County Democrat (Nashville, Brown County; 23 October 1890 – 19 September 1918)
  • Cass County Times (Logansport, Cass County; 16 November 1831 – 12 September 1833)
  • Clark County Democrat (Charlestown, Clark County)
  • Columbus Gazette (Columbus, Bartholomew County)
  • Columbus Weekly News (Columbus, Bartholomew County)
  • Columbus Weekly Union (Columbus, Bartholomew County; 7 December 1867 – 27 February 1869)
  • Corydon Press, and Anti-Masonic Democrat (Corydon, Harrison County; 21 July 1830 – 24 November 1830)
  • Crawfordsville Daily Journal (Crawfordsville; 2 January 1890 – 31 December 1894)
  • Crawfordsville Record (Crawfordsville, Montgomery County; 8 February 1834 – 4 June 1836)
  • Crawfordsville Review (Crawfordsville; 18 June 1853 – 30 December 1899)
  • Crawfordsville Weekly Journal (Crawfordsville; 16 June 1853 – 27 June 1902)
  • Daily American (Terre Haute, Vigo County; 30 May 1855 – 13 September 1855)
  • Daily Evansville Journal (Evansville, Vanderburgh County; 21 May 1862 – 19 September 1863)
  • Daily Greencastle Banner and Times (Greencastle, Putnam County; 1 October 1890 – 18 October 1897)
  • Daily News (Franklin, Johnson County; 19 February 1880 – 29 November 1889)
  • Daily State Sentinel (Indianapolis, Marion County; 3 November 1851 – 31 December 1869)
  • Daily Tribune (Terre Haute, Vigo County; 1 December 1902 – 19 July 1919)
  • Daily Wabash Express (Terre Haute, Vigo County; 12 February 1861 – 18 May 1890)
  • Dale News (Dale, Spencer County; 14 January 1938 – 16 July 1943)
  • Dearborn County Register (Lawrenceburg, Dearborn County)
  • Evansville Argus (Evansville, Vanderburgh County; 25 June 1938 – 22 October 1943)
  • Evansville Daily Courier (Evansville, Vanderburgh County)
  • Evansville Daily Journal (Evansville, Vanderburgh County; 24 November 1870 – 31 December 1870)
  • Evansville Daily Journal (Evansville, Vanderburgh County; 26 April 1848 – 20 May 1862)
  • Evansville Daily Journal (Evansville, Vanderburgh County; 21 September 1863 – 18 April 1866)
  • Evansville Journal (Evansville, Vanderburgh County; 19 April 1866 – 23 November 1870)
  • Evansville Journal (Evansville, Vanderburgh County; 14 October 1840 – 4 November 1852)
  • Evansville Weekly Journal (Evansville, Vanderburgh County; 7 January 1848 – 4 November 1852)
  • Farmers & Mechanics Journal (Vincennes, Knox County; 14 December 1822 – 25 September 1823)
  • Fayette Observer (Connersville, Fayette County; 29 July 1826 – 3 May 1828)
  • Federal Union (Knightstown)
  • Fiery Cross (Indianapolis, Marion County; 8 December 1922 – 20 February 1925)
  • Franklin Daily Herald (Franklin, Johnson County; 6 February 1880 – 8 October 1885)
  • Franklin Repository (Brookville, Franklin County; 31 October 1826 – 19 November 1828)
  • Free Soil Banner (Indianapolis, Marion County; 25 August 1848 – 3 November 1848)
  • Freedom’s Banner (Marion, Grant County; 25 June 1910 – 6 August 1910)
  • Greencastle Banner and Times (Greencastle, Putnam County; 18 September 1890 – 24 December 1897)
  • Greencastle Banner (Greencastle, Putnam County; 2 February 1853 – 16 January 1903)
  • Greencastle Herald (Greencastle, Putnam County; 1 April 1907 – 30 June 1931)
  • Greencastle Star Press (Greencastle, Putnam County; 24 December 1882 – 26 December 1896)
  • Greencastle Star (Greencastle, Putnam County; 3 January 1880 – 24 December 1881)
  • Greenfield Evening Republican (Greenfield; 26 November 1894 – 27 June 1896)
  • Greenfield Evening Star (Greenfield; 17 April 1905 – 31 December 1906)
  • Greenfield Republican (Greenfield; 22 March 1889 – 24 June 1915)
  • Hammond Times (Hammond, Lake County; 17 June 1906 – 30 December 1922)
  • Harrison Gazette (Corydon, Harrison County)
  • Hendricks County Republican (Danville, Hendricks County; 3 April 1879 – 19 December 1907)
  • Hendricks County Union (Danville, Hendricks County; 6 September 1883 – 25 October 1883)
  • Herald-Democrat (Greencastle, Putnam County; 4 April 1913 – 30 December 1921)
  • Hickory Withe (Nashville, Brown County; 11 July 1856 – 24 April 1857)
  • Hoosier Patriot (Rising Sun, Ohio County; 18 September 1852 – 9 October 1852)
  • Hoosier Patron (Indianapolis, Marion County; 27 January 1877 – 28 April 1877)
  • Hope Republican (Hope, Bartholomew County; 28 April 1892 – 19 April 1894)
  • Independent Examiner (Vevay, Switzerland County; 15 February 1824 – 22 March 1824)
  • Indiana American (Brookville, Franklin County; 19 July 1833 – 25 December 1857)
  • Indiana American (Brookville, Franklin County; 29 September 1865 – 3 November 1871)
  • Indiana Centinel (Vincennes, Knox County; 22 May 1819 – 8 September 1821)
  • Indiana Democrat (Rising Sun, Ohio County)
  • Indiana Farmer (Salem, Washington County; 1 June 1822 – 13 January 1826)
  • Indiana Gazette (Corydon, Harrison County; 1 February 1821 – 1 April 1826)
  • Indiana Gazette (Vincennes, Knox County; 7 August 1804 – 12 April 1806)
  • Indiana Intelligencer (Charlestown, Clark County; 5 April 1821 – 18 June 1825)
  • Indiana Monitor (Salem, Washington County)
  • Indiana Oasis (Rising Sun, Ohio County; 5 September 1878 – 3 October 1878)
  • Indiana Oracle (Lawrenceburg, Dearborn County; 15 April 1820 – 18 October 1823)
  • Indiana Palladium (Lawrenceburg, Dearborn County; 7 January 1825 – 30 January 1836)
  • Indiana Phoenix (Salem, Washington County; 19 October 1831 – 15 November 1832)
  • Indiana Recorder and Public Advertiser (New Albany, Floyd County; 29 October 1825 – 3 March 1827)
  • Indiana Register (Vevay, Switzerland County; 25 November 1817 – 2 December 1825)
  • Indiana Republican (Madison, Jefferson County; 16 January 1817 – 5 October 1820)
  • Indiana Reveille (Vevay, Switzerland County; 7 January 1857 – 26 December 1860)
  • Indiana Socialist Party Bulletin (Indianapolis, Marion County; 1 October 1911 – 1 September 1913)
  • Indiana Socialist (Indianapolis, Marion County; 22 March 1913 – 12 July 1913)
  • Indiana Spectator (Lawrenceburg, Dearborn County; 11 December 1824 – 2 December 1825)
  • Indiana State Gazette (Indianapolis, Marion County; 22 October 1829 – 29 July 1830)
  • Indiana State Guard (Indianapolis, Marion County; 17 July 1860 – 20 July 1861)
  • Indiana State Sentinel (Indianapolis, Marion County; 4 June 1845 – 29 December 1849)
  • Indiana State Sentinel (Indianapolis, Marion County; 9 January 1861 – 30 May 1864)
  • Indiana State Sentinel (Indianapolis, Marion County; 21 July 1841 – 30 December 1852)
  • Indiana State Sentinel (Indianapolis, Marion County; 6 January 1874 – 26 December 1894)
  • Indiana Tribüne (Indianapolis, Marion County; 17 August 1878 – 2 March 1907)
  • Indiana True Democrat (Centerville)
  • Indianapolis Daily Herald (Indianapolis, Marion County; 1 November 1865 – 11 April 1868)
  • Indianapolis Journal (Indianapolis, Marion County; 2 February 1872 – 8 June 1904)
  • Indianapolis Leader (Indianapolis, Marion County; 30 August 1879 – 24 June 1882)
  • Indianapolis News (Indianapolis, Marion County; 7 December 1869 – 31 December 1920)
  • Indianapolis Recorder (Indianapolis, Marion County; 7 January 1899 – 30 December 2005)
  • Indianapolis Sentinel (Indianapolis, Marion County; 1 January 1885 – 31 May 1885)
  • Indianapolis Times (Indianapolis; 1 January 1920 – 30 September 1952)
  • Jasper Weekly Courier (Jasper, Dubois County; 19 March 1858 – 30 June 1922)
  • Jeffersonian and Working Men’s Advocate (Richmond; 11 January 1840 – 2 May 1840)
  • Jewish Post (Indianapolis, Marion County; 10 March 1933 – 21 December 2005)
  • Leavenworth Arena (Leavenworth, Crawford County; 17 May 1838 – 3 June 1841)
  • Lebanon Daily Reporter (Lebanon, Boone County; 1 January 1917 – 31 December 1917)
  • Lexington Clipper (Lexington, Scott County; 24 June 1858 – 25 December 1858)
  • Lexington Times (Lexington, Scott County; 27 May 1858 – 3 June 1858)
  • Liberty Express (Liberty, Union County; 3 March 1916 – 18 February 1921)
  • Liberty Gazette (Liberty, Union County)
  • Liberty Herald (Plymouth, Marshall County; 16 March 1854 – 10 July 1919)
  • Locomotive (Indianapolis, Marion County; 16 August 1845 – 25 December 1858)
  • Logansport Republican and Indiana Herald (Logansport, Cass County; 26 September 1833 – 19 December 1833)
  • Madison Daily Courier (Madison, Jefferson County; 30 April 1849 – 30 April 1850)
  • Marion Labor Sentinel (Marion, Grant County; 23 April 1914 – 12 November 1914)
  • Marshall County Democrat (Plymouth, Marshall County; 15 November 1855 – 1 December 1859)
  • Marshall County Independent (Plymouth, Marshall County; 26 October 1894 – 29 November 1895)
  • Marshall County Independent (Plymouth, Marshall County; 17 December 1897 – 27 December 1901)
  • Marshall County Republican (Plymouth, Marshall County; 9 October 1856 – 12 December 1878)
  • Microscope and General Advertiser (New Albany, Floyd County; 11 December 1824 – 25 December 1824)
  • Monroe’s Legal Tender Issue (Columbus, Bartholomew County; 30 August 1876 – 11 October 1876)
  • Muncie Post-Democrat (Muncie, Delaware County; 18 February 1921 – 29 December 1950)
  • Muncie Times (Muncie, Delaware County; 10 January 1991 – 25 2011)
  • Name It & Take It (Smithville, Monroe County; 29 May 1897 – 9 July 1897)
  • National Patriot (Centerville; 29 January 1840 – 28 October 1840)
  • Neutral Pennant (Rising Sun, Ohio County; 13 October 1853 – 10 February 1854)
  • New Richmond Record (New Richmond, Montgomery County; 20 September 1900 – 8 July 1915)
  • New-Albany Chronicle (New Albany, Floyd County; 5 May 1821 – 17 November 1821)
  • New-Harmony and Nashoba Gazette, or, Free Enquirer (New Harmony, Posey County)
  • Noblesville Hoosier Patriot (Noblesville, Hamilton County; 8 December 1859 – 26 April 1860)
  • Olive Branch (Rockville, Parke County)
  • Orland Echo (Orland, Steuben County)
  • Orland Zenith (Orland, Steuben County; 6 April 1900 – 10 January 1923)
  • Paoli Weekly News (Paoli, Orange County; 15 November 1876 – 14 May 1879)
  • Parke County Democrat (Rockville, Parke County)
  • Parke County Whig (Rockville, Parke County; 5 May 1848 – 16 May 1851)
  • People’s Advocate (Salem, Washington County)
  • Plain Dealer (Brookville, Franklin County; 5 November 1816 – 12 November 1816)
  • Plymouth Banner (Plymouth, Marshall County; 3 March 1853 – 24 May 1855)
  • Plymouth Democrat (Plymouth, Marshall County; 9 September 1869 – 2 May 1878)
  • Plymouth Journal (Plymouth, Marshall County)
  • Plymouth Pilot (Plymouth, Marshall County; 16 April 1851 – 7 January 1852)
  • Plymouth Republican (Plymouth, Marshall County; 19 December 1878 – 3 October 1901)
  • Plymouth Tribune (Plymouth, Marshall County; 10 October 1901 – 5 January 1911)
  • Plymouth Weekly Banner (Plymouth, Marshall County; 31 May 1855 – 4 September 1856)
  • Plymouth Weekly Democrat (Plymouth, Marshall County; 26 January 1860 – 2 September 1869)
  • Political Beacon (Lawrenceburg, Dearborn County; 7 October 1837 – 30 October 1845)
  • Political Clarion (Connersville, Fayette County; 12 June 1830 – 7 April 1832)
  • Potawattimie & Miami Times (Logansport, Cass County; 10 October 1829 – 24 August 1831)
  • Public Leger (Richmond, Wayne County; 6 March 1824 – 11 June 1828)
  • Randolph County Journal (Winchester, Randolph County; 31 December 1857 – 19 December 1861)
  • Randolph County Journal (Winchester, Randolph County; 1 January 1864 – 17 August 1865)
  • Randolph Journal (Winchester, Randolph County; 11 July 1862 – 26 September 1862)
  • Randolph Journal (Winchester, Randolph County; 20 September 1866 – 27 June 1867)
  • Republican & Banner (Madison, Jefferson County; 26 September 1833 – 16 October 1834)
  • Richmond Palladium (Daily) (21 December 1877 – 10 February 1923)
  • Richmond Palladium (Weekly) (8 January 1831 – 9 December 1875)
  • Richmond Weekly Intelligencer (Richmond, Wayne County; 2 February 1822 – 25 September 1822)
  • Rising Sun Times (Rising Sun, Ohio County; 16 November 1833 – 16 September 1837)
  • Rockville Intelligencer (Rockville, Parke County)
  • Rushville Weekly Republican (Rushville, Rush County; 3 November 1858 – 9 May 1860)
  • Salem Whig (Salem, Washington County)
  • Saturday Evening Mail (Terre Haute, Vigo County; 2 July 1870 – 11 March 1899)
  • Scott County Democrat (Scottsburg, Scott County)
  • Semi-weekly Express (Terre Haute, Vigo County; 3 January 1896 – 31 December 1897)
  • Semi-weekly Independent (Plymouth, Marshall County; 4 December 1895 – 25 April 1896)
  • Semi-Weekly Journal (Indianapolis, Marion County; 26 November 1840 – 16 October 1841)
  • Shelby Volunteer (Shelbville, Shelby County; 17 February 1859 – 8 September 1864)
  • Smithville News (Smithville, Monroe County; 31 July 1908 – 3 April 1914)
  • South Bend News-Times (South Bend, St. Joseph County; 1 July 1913 – 31 December 1922)
  • Southern Indianian (Charlestown, Clark County)
  • Spirit of Progress (Charlestown, Clark County)
  • Standard (Madison, Jefferson County; 6 February 1835 – 31 December 1835)
  • Star-Democrat (Greencastle, Putnam County; 31 August 1906 – 28 March 1913)
  • Sullivan Daily Times (Sullivan, Sullivan County; 4 January 1945 – 5 October 1949)
  • Switzerland Guest (Vevay, Switzerland County; 8 May 1827 – 19 June 1827)
  • Terre Haute Daily Gazette (Terre Haute, Vigo County; 1 June 1870 – 31 October 1872)
  • Terre Haute Daily News (Terre Haute, Vigo County; 30 November 1889 – 21 August 1891)
  • Terre Haute Daily Union (Terre Haute, Vigo County; 20 June 1857 – 11 January 1859)
  • Terre Haute Evening Gazette (Terre Haute, Vigo County; 1 November 1872 – 6 May 1876)
  • Terre Haute Journal (Terre Haute, Vigo County; 5 October 1858 – 7 January 1876)
  • Terre Haute Weekly Gazette (Terre Haute, Vigo County; 9 October 1873 – 15 September 1887)
  • Terre-Haute Daily American (Terre Haute, Vigo County; 5 May 1855 – 29 May 1855)
  • Terre-Haute Journal (Terre Haute, Vigo County; 6 December 1850 – 22 September 1854)
  • Terre-Haute Weekly Express (Terre Haute, Vigo County; 6 March 1867 – 14 August 1872)
  • The Archer (Rensselaer, Jasper County)
  • The Bartholomew Democrat (Columbus, Bartholomew County; 29 September 1871 – 14 April 1876)
  • The Bloomington Hawkeye (Bloomington, Monroe County; 20 January 1881 – 3 March 1881)
  • The Boone County Pioneer (Lebanon, Boone County; 9 July 1858 – 3 February 1860)
  • The Bulletin (Indianapolis, Marion County; 10 January 1920 – 10 July 1920)
  • The Butcher-Knife (Danville, Hendricks County; 2 May 1857 – 17 October 1857)
  • The colored visitor (Logansport, Cass County)
  • The Columbus Bulletin (Columbus, Bartholomew County; 18 September 1868 – 21 October 1870)
  • The Columbus Herald (Columbus, Bartholomew County; 11 December 1896 – 24 June 1910)
  • The Columbus Republican (Columbus, Bartholomew County; 1 August 1872 – 3 September 1874)
  • The Corner Stone (College Corner, Union County; 8 April 1874 – 10 January 1877)
  • The Cresset (New Albany, Floyd County)
  • The Daily Banner (Greencastle, Putnam County; 2 March 1900 – 31 December 1968)
  • The Daily Evening Democrat (Nashville, Brown County)
  • The Daily Evening Democrat (Columbus, Bartholomew County)
  • The Daily News (Franklin, Johnson County)
  • The Dunreith Record (Dunreith, Henry County)
  • The Evening Democrat (Greencastle, Putnam County; 3 August 1896 – 2 November 1896)
  • The Evening Gazette (Franklin, Johnson County; 16 February 1884 – 20 June 1884)
  • The Evening Star (Franklin, Johnson County; 13 July 1885 – 24 August 1914)
  • The Franklin Jacksonian (Franklin, Johnson County; 8 December 1883 – 25 July 1885)
  • The Greencastle Daily Sun (Greencastle, Putnam County; 21 January 1890 – 14 August 1890)
  • The Greencastle Democrat (Greencastle, Putnam County; 27 February 1892 – 30 October 1903)
  • The Greencastle Times (Greencastle, Putnam County; 31 January 1884 – 14 August 1890)
  • The Hendricks County Gazette (Danville, Hendricks County; 13 September 1881 – 17 March 1898)
  • The Hendricks County Union (Plainfield, Hendricks County; 16 February 1865 – 29 January 1874)
  • The Index (Nashville, Brown County)
  • The Indiana Press (Greencastle, Putnam County; 29 May 1858 – 16 August 1865)
  • The Indiana Times (Salem, Washington County)
  • The Indiana Whig (Lawrenceburg, Dearborn County)
  • The Indiana Whig (Lawrenceburg, Dearborn County; 18 April 1834 – 13 September 1834)
  • The Jacksonian (Nashville, Brown County; 1 May 1873 – 30 March 1883)
  • The Knightstown Journal (Knightstown, Henry County; 10 March 1905 – 22 September 1905)
  • The Lafayette Argus (Lafayette, Tippecanoe County; 27 May 1858 – 29 November 1860)
  • The Lafayette Daily Argus (Lafayette, Tippecanoe County)
  • The Lafayette Daily Courier (Lafayette, Tippecanoe County)
  • The Laporte Weekly Times (LaPorte, LaPorte County)
  • The Lewisville Democrat (Lewisville, Henry County; 14 February 1878 – 4 September 1879)
  • The Liberty Review (Liberty, Union County; 5 November 1886 – 30 November 1899)
  • The Little Western (Noblesville, Hamilton County; 13 January 1844 – 25 January 1845)
  • The Madison Daily Times (Madison, Jefferson County)
  • The Marion Socialist (Marion, Grant County; 20 August 1911 – 27 October 1912)
  • The Nashville Union (Nashville, Brown County; 7 August 1862 – 24 December 1863)
  • The New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Floyd County; 22 October 1858 – 17 November 1858)
  • The New Wolcott Enterprise (Wolcott, White County; 27 July 1967 – 31 December 1970)
  • The Newspaper (Noblesville, Hamilton County; 12 January 1837 – 22 March 1838)
  • The People’s Friend (Covington, Fountain County; 25 September 1861 – 8 October 1862)
  • The People’s Pilot (Rensselaer, Jasper County; 19 September 1895 – 13 May 1897)
  • The Prairie Chieftain (Monticello, White County; 17 September 1850 – 23 December 1854)
  • The Rensselaer Journal (Rensselaer, Jasper County)
  • The Rushville Jacksonian (Rushville, Rush County; 2 April 1858 – 23 May 1860)
  • The Scott County Journal (Scottsburg, Scott County)
  • The Times News (Greencastle, Putnam County; 22 November 1933 – 27 December 1934)
  • The Tipton County Argus (Tipton, Tipton County; 2 July 1858 – 10 December 1858)
  • The Union Times (Liberty, Union County; 11 May 1876 – 7 December 1876)
  • The Vernon Banner (Vernon, Jennings County; 25 December 1858 – 5 March 1859)
  • The Vernon Times (Vernon, Jennings County; 5 June 1919 – 23 April 1920)
  • The Versailles Dispatch (Versailles, Ripley County; 12 February 1858 – 31 May 1866)
  • The Wabash Courier (Terre Haute, Vigo County; 21 June 1832 – 27 December 1856)
  • The Western Register and Terre-Haute advertiser (Terre Haute, Vigo County; 21 July 1823 – 25 December 1830)
  • Tocsin (Salem, Washington County; 8 April 1820 – 10 June 1820)
  • Tri-weekly Journal (Evansville, Vanderburgh County; 15 May 1847 – 9 March 1848)
  • Union County Democrat (Liberty, Union County; 22 September 1882 – 24 November 1882)
  • Vevay Times and Switzerland County Democrat (Vevay, Switzerland County; 4 January 1840 – 3 December 1840)
  • Vincennes Gazette (Vincennes, Knox County; 2 October 1830 – 2 October 1845)
  • Wabash Express (Terre Haute, Vigo County; 12 January 1842 – 23 January 1861)
  • Wabash Herald (Rockville, Parke County; 14 May 1831 – 14 April 1832)
  • Wabash Scratches (Lafayette, Tippecanoe County)
  • Wabash Telegraph (Vincennes, Knox County; 25 May 1827 – 21 November 1828)
  • Waynetown Banner (Waynetown)
  • Waynetown Despatch (Waynetown; 8 February 1896 – 25 July 1930)
  • Waynetown Hornet (Waynetown; 28 January 1888 – 11 February 1893)
  • Weekly Indiana State Sentinel (Indianapolis, Marion County; 10 February 1855 – 2 January 1861)
  • Weekly Messenger (Vevay, Switzerland County; 15 September 1831 – 11 February 1837)
  • Weekly News (Rising Sun, Ohio County; 3 March 1854 – 6 October 1854)
  • Weekly Republican (Plymouth, Marshall County; 12 January 1911 – 2 May 1912)
  • Weekly Reveille (Vevay, Switzerland County; 23 June 1853 – 24 December 1856)
  • Weekly Wabash Express (Terre Haute, Vigo County; 28 January 1863 – 27 February 1867)
  • Western Annotator (Salem, Washington County; 31 May 1828 – 23 October 1834)
  • Western Casket (Scottsburg, Scott County; 26 March 1857 – 14 May 1857)
  • Western Censor, & Emigrants Guide (Indianapolis, Marion County; 4 June 1823 – 22 September 1823)
  • Western Clarion (Madison, Jefferson County; 6 March 1822 – 18 September 1822)
  • Western Commentator (Salem, Washington County)
  • Western Dominion (Tipton, Tipton County)
  • Western Eagle (Madison, Jefferson County; 6 August 1813 – 6 January 1816)
  • Western Emporium (Richmond, Wayne County; 24 April 1824 – 30 April 1825)
  • Western Plough Boy (Greencastle, Putnam County)
  • Western Statesman (Lawrenceburg, Dearborn County; 10 March 1830 – 22 March 1834)
  • Western Sun & General Advertiser (Vincennes, Knox County; 6 December 1817 – 27 December 1834)
  • Western Sun (Vincennes, Knox County; 11 July 1807 – 29 November 1817)
  • Western Times (Richmond, Wayne County; 29 August 1828 – 14 June 1833)
  • Winchester Journal (Winchester, Randolph County; 9 June 1870 – 28 July 1870)
  • Winchester Journal (Winchester, Randolph County; 3 October 1862 – 20 November 1863)
  • Wolcott Beacon (Wolcott, White County; 19 October 1944 – 8 August 1968)

Indiana Legacy (multiple index search)

  • Indiana Gazette
  • Indianapolis Herald
  • Indianapolis Journal
  • Indianapolis News
  • Indianapolis Sentinel
  • Indianapolis Star
  • Indianapolis News
  • Logansport Journal
  • Logansport Weekly Journal
  • Logansport Democratic Pharos
  • New Albany Ledger and Standard
  • Western Sun

INSPIRE Collection (Must be Indiana Resident)

  • Angola – Angola Herald (1877-1963)
  • Angola – Steuben Republican (1860-1964)
  • Argos – Argos Reflector (1881-1966)
  • Brazil – Brazil Daily Times (1907-1964)
  • Bremen – Bremen Daily Enquirer (1891-1892)
  • Bremen – Bremen Enquirer (1885-1964)
  • Bristol – Bristol Banner (1877-1919)
  • Brook – Brook Reporter (1895-1964)
  • Brook – Brookville American (1865-1932)
  • Brook – Brookville Democrat (1896-1956)
  • Charlestown – Charlestown Courier (1941-1964)
  • Clinton – Clinton Daily Clintonian (1935-1954)
  • Columbia City – Columbia City Commercial-Mail (1951-1964)
  • Culver – Culver Citizen (1903-1964)
  • Edinburg – Edinburg Daily Courier (1877-1963)
  • Evansville – Evansville Press (1906-1927)
  • Fairmont – Fairmount News (1888-1964)
  • Fort Wayne – Fort Wayne Daily Gazette (1864-1899)
  • Fort Wayne – Fort Wayne Daily News (1874-1923)
  • Fort Wayne – Fort Wayne Journal-Gazette (1873-1923)
  • Fort Wayne – Fort Wayne Weekly Gazette (1895-1903)
  • Fort Wayne – Fort Wayne Weekly Journal (1890-1899)
  • Fort Wayne – Fort Wayne Weekly Sentinel (1875-1917)
  • Fort Wayne – Fort Wayne Sentinel (1870-1923)
  • Franklin – Evening Star (1912-1919)
  • Franklin – Franklin Evening Star (1920-1966)
  • Garrett – Garrett Clipper (1885-1964)
  • Garrett – Garrett News (1876-1901)
  • Greenfield – Greenfield Daily Reporter (1905-2017)
  • Greenfield – Hancock Democrat (1860-1957)
  • Logansport – Logansport Pharos-Tribune (1890-2006)

County and Library Collections:

Allen County Public Library Newspaper Archives

Berne Public Library

  • Adams County Daily Witness
  • Adams County Witness
  • The Adams County Sun and Berne Daily Witness
  • The Berne Review
  • The Berne Tri-Weekly
  • The Berne Witness

Carroll County Newspaper Archives

Dearborn County Newspaper Index

  • Aurora Dearborn County Democrat (1838-1840)
  • Aurora Western Commercial (1848-1851)
  • Aurora Standard (1851-1856)
  • Aurora Commercial (1859-1868)
  • Aurora Peoples Advocate (1868-1870)
  • Aurora Dearborn Independent (1868-1917)
  • Aurora Farmer and Mechanic (1873-1874)
  • Aurora Saturday News (1879-1880)
  • Aurora Spectator (1882-1893)
  • Aurora Saturday Bulletin (1894-1899)
  • Lawrenceburg Indiana Oracle (1820-1823)
  • Lawrenceburg Indiana Spectator (1824-1825)
  • Lawrenceburg Indiana Palladium (1825-1836)
  • Lawrenceburg Western Statesman (1830-1834)
  • Lawrenceburg Political Beacon (1837-1845)
  • Lawrenceburg Indiana Whig (1834, 1844)
  • Lawrenceburg Standard and Press (1856-1857)
  • Lawrenceburg Register (1877-1889)
  • Wilmington Dearborn County Register (1842)

Evansville Historic Newspaper Index

  • Evansville Enquirer
  • Evansville Gazette
  • Evansville Weekly Journal
  • Evansville Tri-Weekly Journal
  • Evansville Daily Journal

Hamilton County Newspaper Database (index)

Howard County Memory Project

  • Greentown Gem
  • Greentown Grapevine

Knox County Public Library

  • Vincennes Sun-Commercial
  • Sunday Commercial 
  • Vincennes Commercial
  • Sunday Vincennes
  • Daily Commercial
  • Commercial Vincennes
  • Vincennes Daily Commercial 
  • Sunday Daily Commercial
  • Daily Vincennes Commercial 
  • Vincennes Times 
  • Vincennes Weekly Sun 
  • Weekly Western Sun 
  • Western Sun
  • Western Sun and General Advertiser
  • The Vincennes Commercial 
  • The Vincennes Sun Commercial
  • The Vincennes Sun
  • The Vincennes Sun-Commercial
  • Vincennes Sun – Commercial
  • Vincennes Sun Commercial

Logansport Newspaper Archives

New Albany – Floyd County Public Library Newspaper Index  (Index only)

Ohio County – Rising Sun Newspaper Index 1833-1860

  • Hoosier Patriot (1852)
  • Indiana Democrat (1858)
  • Indiana Oasis (1878)
  • Indiana Weekly Visitor (1857-1860)
  • Indiana Whig (1848-1850)
  • Neutral Pennant (1853-1854)
  • Rising Sun (1833-1834)
  • Rising Sun Mirror (1849-1851)
  • Rising Sun Times (1834-1837)
  • True Whig (1850)
  • Weekly Times (1854)

St. Joseph County Public Library Newspapers

  • Clay Township News
  • New Era
  • Reformer
  • River Park Free Press
  • South Bend Herald
  • South Bend Mirror
  • South Bend Today
  • The Farm News

Tipton County Newspaper Archives

Switzerland County – Vevay Newspaper Index

  • Campaign Palladium (1848)
  • Daily Bulletin (1876)
  • Independent Examiner (1824)
  • Indiana Palladium (1843-1851)
  • Indiana Register (1817-1825)
  • Indiana Reveille (1857-1860, 1864)
  • Ohio Valley Gazette (1851-1853)
  • Reveille and News (1861)
  • Switzerland Guest (1827)
  • Vevay Democrat (1868-1898)
  • Vevay Reveille (1862-1863, 1865-1901)
  • Vevay Times and Switzerland County Democrat (1840)
  • Village Times (1836-1837)
  • Weekly Messenger (1831-1837)
  • Weekly Times (1856-1860)
  • Weekly Reveille (1853-1856)

Washington Public Library Newspaper Archives

Student Collections:

Anderson University – Anderson

Arsenal Technical School – Indianapolis

Ball State University – Muncie

Bethel University – Mishawaka

Bishop Chatard High School – Indianapolis

Burris Laboratory School – Muncie

Butler University – Indianapolis

Calumet College of St Joseph – Whiting

Carmel High School – Carmel

Center School – Muncie

Depauw University – Greencastle

Earlham College – Richmond

Franklin College – Franklin

Goshen College – Goshen

Grace College – Winona Lake

Hanover College – Hanover

Huntington University – Huntington

Indiana Boys School – Plainfield

Indiana School for the Deaf – Indianapolis

Indiana State University – Terre Haute

Indiana University – Bloomington

Indiana University – Kokomo

Indiana University – Purdue University – Fort Wayne

Indiana University – Purdue University – Indianapolis

Indiana University – South Bend

Indiana University Southeast – New Albany

Indiana Wesleyan University – Marion

Jefferson High School – Lafayette

John Adams High School – South Bend

John Marshall High School – Indianapolis

Lawrence North High School – Indianapolis

Manchester University – North Manchester

Marian University – Indianapolis

New Albany High School – New Albany

North Central High School – Indianapolis

Notre Dame University – South Bend

Purdue University – West Lafayette

Purdue University Northwest – Hammond

Purdue University Northwest – Westville

Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology – Terre Haute

Saint Joseph’s College – Rensselaer

Shortridge High School – Indianapolis

Southport High School – Indianapolis

Thomas Carr Howe High School – Indianapolis

Trine University – Angola

University of Evansville – Evansville

University of Indianapolis – Indianapolis

University of Southern Indiana – Evansville

Valparaiso University – Valparaiso

Wabash College – Crawfordsville

Miscellaneous Collections and Indexes:

Independent Voices – Alternative Newspapers

  • Aerospaced
  • The Spectator
  • First Amendment
  • Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow

Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) Newspapers 1933-1942

Indiana State Library Civilian Conservation Corps Newsletters

  • Boundary Hill Beacon (Co. 1596, Brookville, Franklin County) 
  • Camp Chatter of Company 517 (Co. 517, Brownstown, Jackson County)
  • Camp Clark Comet (Co. 1599, Henryville, Clark County) 
  • Camp Clifty Clarion (Co. 1597, Madison, Jefferson County)
  • Camp Eagle (Co. 1598, Wadesville, Posey County)
  • Cardinal (Co. 596, Versailles, Ripley County) 
  • Ditch Dots and Dashes (Co. 517, South Bend, St Joseph Co, and Portland, Jay County)
  • Eroder’s Camp Weekly (Co. 1511, Boonville, Warrick County)
  • Flying Chips (Co. 515, Martinsville, Morgan County)
  • Frankton Weekly (Co. 1585, Frankton, Madison County)
  • Hoosier Civie (Fort Benjamin Harrison, Marion County)
  • Hoosier Dunesman (Co. 556, Chesteron, Porter County)
  • Hoosier Kernels (Co. 2583, Tell City, Perry County)
  • Idle Hours (Co. 1583, Frankton, Madison County)
  • Kokomo Klarion (Co. 1581, Kokomo, Howard County)
  • Lintonian C.O.P. (Co. 2582, Linton, Greene County)
  • Madison Sector News (Co. 514, Henryville, Jefferson County)
  • News from C.C.C. Company 539 (Co. 539, Evansville, Vanderburgh County)
  • No-Now (Co. 1582, Monon, White County)
  • Peru Pitter Patter (Co. 3550, Peru, Miami County)
  • Princeton Prattle (Co. 3550, Princeton, Gibson County)
  • Ripley Veteran (Co. 3564, Versailles, Ripley County)
  • Robin Hood Bugle (Co. 1596, South Bend, St. Joseph County)
  • Sand Hill Bulletin (Co. 1561, Medaryville, Pulaski County)
  • Smile’s Weekly (Co. 1590, Fort Wayne, Allen County)
  • The 539 Journal (Co. 539, Evansville, Vanderburgh County)
  • The Arrow (Co. 596, Versailles, Ripley County)
  • The Call Master (Co. 1589, Wadesville, Posey County)
  • The Camp Jackson Blatter (Co. 1556, Brownstown, Jackson County) 
  • The Candlelight (Co. 1592, Corydon, Harrison Co. and Bluffton, Wells County) 
  • The Canyon Echo (Co. 689, Spencer, Owen County)
  • The Cavalier (Co. 1593, Worthington, Greene County)
  • The Chronicle (Co. 2582, Linton, Greene County)
  • The Comet (Co. 1582, Monon, White County)
  • The Englishton Eagle (Co. 2585, Lexington, Scott County)
  • The Fort Ben Banner (Co. 3550, Fort Benjamin Harrison, Marion County)
  • The Hilltop Observer (Co. 1561, Nashville, Brown County)
  • The Lagrozette (Co. 589, Lagro, Wabash County)
  • The Limberlost Ledger (Co. 2585, Kendallville, Noble County)
  • The Little America Flash (Co. 1594, Kurtz, Jackson County)
  • The Mud Turtle (Co. 1590, Fort Wayne, Allen County)
  • The Muskrat (Co. 1589, Lebanon, Boone County)
  • The Pokagon Chieftain (Co. 556, Angola, Steuben County)
  • The Pokagon Papoose (Co. 556, Angola, Steuben County)
  • The Princeton Builder (Co. 556, Angola, Gibson County)
  • The Resurrector (Co. 1598, Wadesville, Posey County)
  • The Robin (Co. 1596, South Bend, St. Joseph County)
  • The Salamonian (Co. 589, Largo, Wabash County) 
  • The Salamonie Chow Bell (Co. 589, Largo, Wabash County) 
  • The Sandlander (Co. 515, Medaryville, Pulaski County)
  • The Screw Driver (Co. 586, Freetown, Jackson County)
  • The Spring Mill Reveille (Co. 539. Mitchell, Lawrence County)
  • The Stripper-Lite (Co. 2582, Linton, Greene County)
  • The Tecumseh Tattler (Co. 1587, Lafayette, Tippecanoe County)
  • The Washington Beacon (Co. 559, Washington, Daviess County)
  • The Weed Patch Vet Varieties (Co. 1557, Nashville, Brown County)
  • Turkey Run Flash (Co. 2580, Marshall, Parke County)
  • Valpo Vane (Co. 1583, Valparaiso, Porter County)
  • Vets Defense Chronicle (Co. 3564, Nashville, Brown County)
  • Wyandotte Wahoo (Co. 517, South Bend, St. Joseph County)

Indiana – Company Employee Newsletters/Newspapers

  • Ayrograms (L. S. Ayres & Company, Indianapolis)
  • Bell Telephone News (Indiana Bell Telephone Co., Indianapolis)
  • Bendixline (Bendix Aviation Corporation, South Bend)
  • Block’s Booster (The Wm. H. Block Company, Indianapolis)
  • Blue Star/Lens Life (Continental Optical Co., Indianapolis)
  • Cabidea Courier (Haynes Stellite Co., Kokomo)
  • Calumet Service (Calumet Gas and Electric Company, Gary)
  • Chain Gang: F.D.C. News Letter (Diamond Chain Mfg. Co., Indianapolis) 
  • Columbia Cauldron (Columbia Conserve Company, Indianapolis) 
  • Delco-Remy Clan (Delco-Remy Division of General Motors, Anderson)
  • Dodge News (Dodge Manufacturing Corp., Mishawaka) 
  • Gary Works Circle (Gary Works, Illinois Steel Co., Gary)
  • Guide Light (Guide Lamp Division of General Motors, Anderson)
  • Kingan Folks (Kingan and Company, Indianapolis)
  • Magnavoice (Magnavox, Fort Wayne)
  • Malleable News (National Malleable and Steel Castings Co., Indianapolis)
  • Mallory Life (P.R. Mallory and Co., Indianapolis)
  • News in General (The General Tire and Rubber Company, Wabash)
  • Peerless (Peerless of America, Inc., Marion)
  • Safety (Union Traction Co. of Indiana, Indianapolis)
  • Scraps (The Diamond Chain and Manufacturing Co., Indianapolis) 
  • Servel Inklings (Servel, Inc., Evansville) 
  • Spirit of the Nation (Commercial Solvents Corporation, Terre Haute) 
  • Stanolind Record (Standard Oil Company (Indiana), Whiting)
  • Stewart-Warner Reporter (Stewart-Warner Corporation, Indianapolis) 
  • Studebaker Spotlight (The Studebaker Corp., South Bend)
  • Terre Haute’s Onizette (Owens Illinois Glass Co., Plant 25, Terre Haute)
  • The Aluminator (Lafayette Works, Aluminum Co. of America, Lafayette)
  • The Bullet (Chrysler Corp., Evansville)
  • The Cabinetmaker (Singer Mfg. Co., South Bend)
  • The Circle (Perfect Circle Co., Hagerstown)
  • The Continental (Continental Foundry and Machine Co., East Chicago)
  • The Gold Star (Lone Star Cement Co., Greencastle)
  • The Keener News (Kuhner Packing Company, Muncie, Fort Wayne) 
  • The McQuay-Way (McQuay-Norris Manufacturing Co., Connersville) 
  • The Pantagraph (Chicago South Shore and South Bend Railroad, Michigan City) 
  • The Rex Top-ics (Rex Manufacturing Company, Connersville)
  • The Try-Square (Vonnegut Hardware Co., Indianapolis)
  • U.S. Hoosiers (United States Rubber Company, Indianapolis)
  • Vitreous Views (Vitreous Steel Products Company, Nappanee)
  • Wayne Knit Rav-lings (Wayne Knit Co., Fort Wayne) 

Small Town Papers

Old Fulton Postcards

  • Greencastle IN Banner and Times
  • Indianapolis IN Daily State Sentinel
  • Indianapolis IN Evening News

The Olden Times – Indiana

Newspaper Abstracts – Indiana

For Obituary Indexes, transcriptions, and other death/obituary information from historic newspapers, please check out the Obituaries page.

Other Free Sites:

Anderson

Evansville

Huntington

Indianapolis

Lafayette

Logansport

Merrillville and Gary

Muncie

New Garden

Richmond

Smithville

South Bend

South Bend and Fort Wayne

Subscription or Pay Sites:

Ancestry.com:

There are currently 54 publications available at this site. See all the titles at Ancestry – Indiana Newspapers

Genealogy Bank:

There are currently 246 publications available at this site. See all the titles at Genealogy Bank – Indiana Newspapers

Newspaper Archive:

There are currently 1,058 publications available at this site. See all the titles at Newspaper Archive – Indiana

Newspapers.com:

There are currently 240 publications available at this site. See all the titles at Newspapers.com – Indiana

And Finally:

You also need to check out the Indiana State Librarysite, which can tell you what is happening in the state with regard to the newspapers that have been digitized and are becoming available via microfilm or online. 

Please note – even more may be available via a local library where a library card is required. And of course there is always microfilm for those that have not been made available online as yet.

Good Luck and Happy Hunting!

For more links for different states, provinces, and countries – please see the Newspaper Linkspage on this website.

For other Free Indiana Links, click on the category of interest:

Источник: https://theancestorhunt.com/blog/indiana-online-historical-newspapers-summary/

Boone County attorney calls for Linda Tally-Smith's resignation over Dooley controversy

BURLINGTON, Ky. -- As a commonwealth's attorney, Linda Tally-Smith is in a high-profile office.

She's an elected official who ran for the job as a Republican. But now, there's concern among some members of the party about its response to information disclosed in court last month that Tally-Smith had an affair with former Boone County Sheriff's Office detective Bruce McVay.

McVay was the lead detective on the Michelle Mockbee murder case five years ago. Tally-Smith prosecuted David Dooley for killing Mockbee at the warehouse where they both worked.

McVay and Tally-Smith took the stand last month because Dooley's attorney is trying to get a new trial by raising doubts about whether detectives turned over all the evidence in the case. A surveillance video clip shows an unknown man at the warehouse where Mockbee was killed.

Tally-Smith testified McVay never told her about the video before the trial. But McVay testified he did tell her.

 

Boone County attorney Robert Neace said in a Monday night meeting of the Boone County Republican Party that he had twice asked Tally-Smith to resign over the controversy, which he argued undermined public faith in the county's justice system. She refused both times, he said, and he took his complaint to the attorney general. 

"I’m not going to get into who you believe or don’t believe in terms of the testimony and what’s been said, but Linda Tally Smith remaining our Commonwealth Attorney is untenable," he said. "Our justice system in Boone County has been damaged greatly, and it needs to heal. We need to resolve this and resolve it as quickly as we can."

Watch Neace's complete speech below:

 

Neace urged other members to move for her resignation, but the party voted to not make a statement on the issue.

David Miller, a member of the party, who is also an attorney in Ohio, said the accusations are serious enough for the group to take a stand.

"She could serve out her term, but there's going to be such a dark cloud hovering over her, I just don't see how you can continue to get anything done," Miller said. "I mean ... any motive in any case is going to be questioned."

Even if the Boone County Republican Party asks Tally-Smith to resign, the group has no official say in what happens next.

When a reporter asked county officials if any other cases could be affected by the information that came out in the Dooley case, they said it would be up to the attorney general's office. They confirmed that Tally-Smith is still the commonwealth's attorney for Boone and Gallatin counties.

When asked if there could be an ethics investigation, the Kentucky Bar Association sent back a response stating, "Disciplinary proceedings are confidential under Supreme Court Rule 3.150."

Tally-Smith provided the following statement:

"I was advised two weeks ago that the Boone County Republican Party was planning to discuss issues relating to my position as Commonwealth’s Attorney for Boone and Gallatin Counties at the regular meeting tonight at 6:30 p.m.  However, I have received calls from several party precinct leaders and members of the media indicating that a handful of members will be pushing for the party to vote on a request for my resignation at tonight’s meeting.

"Approximately two years ago, I made a number of choices in my personal life that I truly regret.  I am especially remorseful for the personal decisions that I made that caused pain to others, most particularly my own family.  However, the personal mistakes made during a very difficult time in my life have not impacted the work that I have done as Commonwealth’s Attorney or the rights of any persons prosecuted by my office.

"During the hearing in March, I testified before Judge Schrand for over 7 hours.  I have not made many public statements about this matter, as I believe that Judge Schrand should be permitted to render his decision without attempted outside influence.  I have always made it clear, however, that I have not withheld any evidence in connection with the Dooley case, or any case for that matter.  The evidence received by the Court during the hearing confirms that.

"As a Republican my entire adult life, and a prosecutor for more than twenty-three years, I have always believed that our Constitution should be honored, and its tenets preserved and cherished at all costs.  The irony of this matter is not lost on me – David Dooley was convicted by a jury of his peers of Murder and Tampering with Physical Evidence after the Court ensured that he was afforded all Due Process and constitutional protections.  Yet some citizens have concluded that he is not guilty based solely upon information gleaned from media coverage -- even though they never attended a single day of trial, did not see a single item of evidence, nor heard the testimony of any witnesses.  Likewise, some people believe that I am “guilty” of wrongdoing, even though no court or public agency has found that I have violated any ethical or professional responsibilities, and they have not heard all of the testimony or seen the evidence presented during the hearing in March.  Justice and Due Process demands that the Court be permitted to render its decision free of outside influences or attempts by a few people with ulterior motives to somehow sway the outcome. 

"I am truly sorry that my actions have cause heartache for my family and others.  However, my personal choices have had no impact on public safety or the work of my office.  Since these allegations were first raised back in September, 2016, I have been doing exactly what I have done every day since I was elected in 2000 – my job.  I continue to be a devoted public servant to the people of Boone and Gallatin Counties."

Источник: https://www.wcpo.com/news/local-news/boone-county/boone-county-republicans-discussing-allegations-against-commonwealths-attorney

Indiana is one of the states that does have a central online repository for searching historical newspapers. Several states use the Library of Congress Chronicling America site as their main central online site for searching old newspapers. Indiana does have many online newspapers available on that site as well as their own central site. Indiana also has its online availability from several other different websites as well. Many are free and many require a subscription. Below is a list of where the titles are stored and the link so that you can access them. 

There are over 4,700 newspapers that have been published in the Hoosier State.  But there are quite a few that are indeed available. So go for it – find your Indiana ancestors and all the interesting articles that capture the stories of their lives. 

Please note that I have not always entered the dates that are included in the collections, as I suspect they will change as more items are digitized. Also I suspect that some of these links may change over time – so if there is a dead link – please use your favorite search engine to find their new location. 

(Updated November 2021; recently added links are in BOLD)

Free Sites:

Statewide Collections:

Chronicling America – Indiana

  • Brookville, Ind., 1833-1861 – Indiana American.
  • Brookville, Ind., 1858-1861 – Brookville American.
  • Brookville, Ind., 1865-1872 – Indiana American.
  • Evansville, Ia. [i.e. Ind.], 1847-188? – Tri-weekly journal.
  • Evansville, Ia. [i.e. Ind.], 1848-1862 – The Evansville daily journal.
  • Evansville, Ind., 1834-184? – The Evansville journal.
  • Evansville, Ind., 184?-18?? – Evansville weekly journal.
  • Evansville, Ind., 1862-1863 – The daily Evansville journal.
  • Evansville, Ind., 1863-1866 – Evansville daily journal.
  • Evansville, Ind., 1866-1870 – The Evansville journal.
  • Evansville, Ind., 1870-1875 – The Evansville daily journal.
  • Hammond, Ind., 1906-1933 – The Lake County times.
  • Indianapolis [Ind.], 1841-1853 – Indiana State sentinel.
  • Indianapolis [Ind.], 1845-1851 – Indiana State sentinel.
  • Indianapolis [Ind.], 1853-1861 – Weekly Indiana State sentinel.
  • Indianapolis [Ind.], 1867-1904 – The Indianapolis journal.
  • Indianapolis [Ind.], 1868-1895 – The Indiana State sentinel.
  • Indianapolis, 1841-1853 – Indiana State sentinel. [volume]
  • Indianapolis, 1868-1895 – The Indiana State sentinel. [volume]
  • Indianapolis, Ind., 1861-1865 – Daily State sentinel.
  • Indianapolis, Ind., 1861-1865 – Indiana State sentinel.
  • Indianapolis, Ind., 1865-1868 – The Indianapolis daily herald.
  • Indianapolis, Ind., 1878-1907 – Indiana tribüne.
  • Indianapolis, Ind., 1879-1890 – The Indianapolis leader.
  • Indianapolis, Ind., 1880-1904 – The Indianapolis sentinel.
  • Jasper, Ind., 1858-1922 – The Jasper weekly courier.
  • Louisville, Ky., 1904-???? – Ohio valley worker : official paper of the Federated Trades Council of Louisville, Trades and Labor Council of New Albany, Central Labor Union of Jeffersonville.
  • Plymouth, Ind., 1855-1856 – Plymouth weekly banner.
  • Plymouth, Ind., 1855-1859 – Marshall County Democrat.
  • Plymouth, Ind., 1856-1878 – Marshall County Republican.
  • Plymouth, Ind., 1860-1869 – The Plymouth weekly Democrat.
  • Plymouth, Ind., 1869-1941 – The Plymouth Democrat.
  • Plymouth, Ind., 1878-1901 – The Plymouth Republican.
  • Plymouth, Ind., 1901-1911 – The Plymouth tribune.
  • Plymouth, Ind., 1911-1922 – The weekly Republican.
  • Plymouth, Marshall County, Ind., 1851-1852 – The Plymouth pilot.
  • Plymouth, Marshall County, Ind., 1852-1855 – Plymouth banner.
  • Plymouth, Marshall County, Ind., 1894-1895 – Marshall County independent.
  • Plymouth, Marshall County, Ind., 1895-1897 – Semi-weekly independent.
  • Plymouth, Marshall County, Ind., 1897-1902 – Marshall County independent.
  • Richmond, IA [i.e. Ind.], 1839-1854 – Richmond palladium.
  • Richmond, Ind., 1837-1839 – Richmond Indiana palladium.
  • Richmond, Ind., 1854-1855 – The Richmond Indiana palladium.
  • Richmond, Ind., 1855-1875 – The Richmond palladium.
  • Richmond, Ind., 1875-1905 – Richmond weekly palladium.
  • Richmond, Ind., 1876-1904 – Richmond daily palladium.
  • Richmond, Ind., 1904-1905 – The daily palladium.
  • Richmond, Ind., 1905-1906 – Richmond daily palladium.
  • Richmond, Ind., 1906-1907 – The Richmond palladium.
  • Richmond, Ind., 1907-1939 – The Richmond palladium and sun-telegram.
  • Richmond, Wayne County, Ind., 1831-1837 – Richmond palladium.
  • South Bend, Ind., 1913-1938 – South Bend news-times.
  • Terre-Haute, Ind., 1857-1867 – The daily Wabash express.
  • Terre-Haute, Vigo County, Ind., 1841-186? – Wabash express.
  • Winchester, Ind., 18??-1920 – The Winchester journal.
  • Winchester, Ind., 1862-1862 – Randolph journal.
  • Winchester, Ind., 1862-1863 – Winchester journal.
  • Winchester, Ind., 1864-1865 – Randolph County journal.
  • Winchester, Ind., 1865-186? – Randolph journal.
  • Winchester, Randolph County, Ind., 1855-1862 – Randolph County journal.

Google News Archive

Hoosier State Chronicles

  • Banner Graphic (Greencastle, Putnam County; 1 March 1973 – 31 December 1974)
  • Bedford Independent (Bedford, Lawrence County; 3 April 1856 – 19 August 1857)
  • Bloomington Courier (Bloomington, Monroe County; 8 January 1881 – 20 September 1895)
  • Bloomington Daily Telephone (Bloomington, Monroe County; 14 November 1932 – 31 December 1932)
  • Bloomington Post (Bloomington, Monroe County; 6 November 1835 – 22 March 1839)
  • Bloomington Progress (Bloomington, Monroe County; 19 May 1869 – 9 March 1900)
  • Bloomington Republican (Bloomington, Monroe County; 6 January 1827 – 3 November 1827)
  • Bloomington Telephone (Bloomington, Monroe County; 13 December 1879 – 29 December 1893)
  • Brookville American (Brookville, Franklin County; 19 February 1858 – 21 December 1860)
  • Brookville Inquirer (Brookville, Franklin County; 23 October 1824 – 21 June 1833)
  • Brown County Banner (Nashville, Brown County; 18 August 1898 – 10 November 1898)
  • Brown County Democrat (Nashville, Brown County; 23 October 1890 – 19 September 1918)
  • Cass County Times (Logansport, Cass County; 16 November 1831 – 12 September 1833)
  • Clark County Democrat (Charlestown, Clark County)
  • Columbus Gazette (Columbus, Bartholomew County)
  • Columbus Weekly News (Columbus, Bartholomew County)
  • Columbus Weekly Union (Columbus, Bartholomew County; 7 December 1867 – 27 February 1869)
  • Corydon Press, and Anti-Masonic Democrat (Corydon, Harrison County; 21 July 1830 – 24 November 1830)
  • Crawfordsville Daily Journal (Crawfordsville; 2 January 1890 – 31 December 1894)
  • Crawfordsville Record (Crawfordsville, Montgomery County; 8 February 1834 – 4 June 1836)
  • Crawfordsville Review (Crawfordsville; 18 June 1853 – 30 December 1899)
  • Crawfordsville Weekly Journal (Crawfordsville; 16 June 1853 – 27 June 1902)
  • Daily American (Terre Haute, Vigo County; 30 May 1855 – 13 September 1855)
  • Daily Evansville Journal (Evansville, Vanderburgh County; 21 May 1862 – 19 September 1863)
  • Daily Greencastle Banner and Times (Greencastle, Putnam County; 1 October 1890 – 18 October 1897)
  • Daily News (Franklin, Johnson County; 19 February 1880 – 29 November 1889)
  • Daily State Sentinel (Indianapolis, Marion County; 3 November 1851 – 31 December 1869)
  • Daily Tribune (Terre Haute, Vigo County; 1 December 1902 – 19 July 1919)
  • Daily Wabash Express (Terre Haute, Vigo County; 12 February 1861 – 18 May 1890)
  • Dale News (Dale, Spencer County; 14 January 1938 – 16 July 1943)
  • Dearborn County Register (Lawrenceburg, Dearborn County)
  • Evansville Argus (Evansville, Vanderburgh County; 25 June 1938 – 22 October 1943)
  • Evansville Daily Courier (Evansville, Vanderburgh County)
  • Evansville Daily Journal (Evansville, Vanderburgh County; 24 November 1870 – 31 December 1870)
  • Evansville Daily Journal (Evansville, Vanderburgh County; 26 April 1848 – 20 May 1862)
  • Evansville Daily Journal (Evansville, Vanderburgh County; 21 September 1863 – 18 April 1866)
  • Evansville Journal (Evansville, Vanderburgh County; 19 April 1866 – 23 November 1870)
  • Evansville Journal (Evansville, Vanderburgh County; 14 October 1840 – 4 November 1852)
  • Evansville Weekly Journal (Evansville, Vanderburgh County; 7 January 1848 – 4 November 1852)
  • Farmers & Mechanics Journal (Vincennes, Knox County; 14 December 1822 – 25 September 1823)
  • Fayette Observer (Connersville, Fayette County; 29 July 1826 – 3 May 1828)
  • Federal Union (Knightstown)
  • Fiery Cross (Indianapolis, Marion County; 8 December 1922 – 20 February 1925)
  • Franklin Daily Herald (Franklin, Johnson County; 6 February 1880 – 8 October 1885)
  • Franklin Repository (Brookville, Franklin County; 31 October 1826 – 19 November 1828)
  • Free Soil Banner (Indianapolis, Marion County; 25 August 1848 – 3 November 1848)
  • Freedom’s Banner (Marion, Grant County; 25 June 1910 – 6 August 1910)
  • Greencastle Banner and Times (Greencastle, Putnam County; 18 September 1890 – 24 December 1897)
  • Greencastle Banner (Greencastle, Putnam County; 2 February 1853 – 16 January 1903)
  • Greencastle Herald (Greencastle, Putnam County; 1 April 1907 – 30 June 1931)
  • Greencastle Star Press (Greencastle, Putnam County; 24 December 1882 – 26 December 1896)
  • Greencastle Star (Greencastle, Putnam County; 3 January 1880 – 24 December 1881)
  • Greenfield Evening Republican (Greenfield; 26 November 1894 – 27 June 1896)
  • Greenfield Evening Star (Greenfield; 17 April 1905 – 31 December 1906)
  • Greenfield Republican (Greenfield; 22 March 1889 – 24 June 1915)
  • Hammond Times (Hammond, Lake County; 17 June 1906 – 30 December 1922)
  • Harrison Gazette (Corydon, Harrison County)
  • Hendricks County Republican (Danville, Hendricks County; 3 April 1879 – 19 December 1907)
  • Hendricks County Union (Danville, Hendricks County; 6 September 1883 – 25 October 1883)
  • Herald-Democrat (Greencastle, Putnam County; 4 April 1913 – 30 December 1921)
  • Hickory Withe (Nashville, Brown County; 11 July 1856 – 24 April 1857)
  • Hoosier Patriot (Rising Sun, Ohio County; 18 September 1852 – comenity bank new york and company customer service number October 1852)
  • Hoosier Patron (Indianapolis, Marion County; 27 January 1877 – 28 April 1877)
  • Hope Republican (Hope, Bartholomew County; 28 April 1892 – 19 April 1894)
  • Independent Examiner (Vevay, Switzerland County; 15 February 1824 – 22 March 1824)
  • Indiana American (Brookville, Franklin County; 19 July 1833 – 25 December 1857)
  • Indiana American (Brookville, Franklin County; 29 September 1865 – 3 November 1871)
  • Indiana Centinel (Vincennes, Knox County; 22 May 1819 – 8 September 1821)
  • Indiana Democrat (Rising Sun, Ohio County)
  • Indiana Farmer (Salem, Washington County; 1 June 1822 – 13 January 1826)
  • Indiana Gazette (Corydon, Harrison County; 1 February 1821 – 1 April 1826)
  • Indiana Gazette (Vincennes, Knox County; 7 August 1804 – 12 April 1806)
  • Indiana Intelligencer (Charlestown, Clark County; 5 April 1821 – 18 June 1825)
  • Indiana Monitor (Salem, Washington County)
  • Indiana Oasis (Rising Sun, Ohio County; 5 September 1878 – 3 October 1878)
  • Indiana Oracle (Lawrenceburg, Dearborn County; 15 April 1820 – 18 October 1823)
  • Indiana Palladium (Lawrenceburg, Dearborn County; 7 January 1825 – 30 January 1836)
  • Indiana Phoenix (Salem, Washington County; 19 October 1831 – 15 November 1832)
  • Indiana Recorder and Public Advertiser (New Albany, Floyd County; 29 October 1825 – 3 March 1827)
  • Indiana Register (Vevay, Switzerland County; 25 November 1817 – 2 December 1825)
  • Indiana Republican (Madison, Jefferson County; 16 January 1817 – 5 October 1820)
  • Indiana Reveille (Vevay, Switzerland County; 7 January 1857 – 26 December 1860)
  • Indiana Socialist Party Bulletin (Indianapolis, Marion County; 1 October 1911 – 1 September 1913)
  • Indiana Socialist (Indianapolis, Marion County; 22 March 1913 – 12 July 1913)
  • Indiana Spectator (Lawrenceburg, Dearborn County; 11 December 1824 – 2 December 1825)
  • Indiana State Gazette (Indianapolis, Marion County; 22 October 1829 – 29 July 1830)
  • Indiana State Guard (Indianapolis, Marion County; 17 July 1860 – 20 July 1861)
  • Indiana State Sentinel (Indianapolis, Marion County; 4 June 1845 – 29 December 1849)
  • Indiana State Sentinel (Indianapolis, Marion County; 9 January 1861 – 30 May 1864)
  • Indiana State Sentinel (Indianapolis, Marion County; 21 July 1841 – 30 December 1852)
  • Indiana State Sentinel (Indianapolis, Marion County; 6 January 1874 – 26 December 1894)
  • Indiana Tribüne (Indianapolis, Marion County; 17 August 1878 – 2 March 1907)
  • Indiana True Democrat (Centerville)
  • Indianapolis Daily Herald (Indianapolis, Marion County; 1 November 1865 – 11 April 1868)
  • Indianapolis Journal (Indianapolis, Marion County; 2 February 1872 – 8 June 1904)
  • Indianapolis Leader (Indianapolis, Marion County; 30 August 1879 – 24 June 1882)
  • Indianapolis News (Indianapolis, Marion County; 7 December 1869 – 31 December 1920)
  • Indianapolis Recorder (Indianapolis, Marion County; 7 January 1899 – 30 December 2005)
  • Indianapolis Sentinel (Indianapolis, Marion County; 1 January 1885 – 31 May 1885)
  • Indianapolis Times (Indianapolis; 1 January 1920 – 30 September 1952)
  • Jasper Weekly Courier (Jasper, Dubois County; 19 March 1858 – 30 June 1922)
  • Jeffersonian and Working Men’s Advocate (Richmond; 11 January 1840 – 2 May 1840)
  • Jewish Post (Indianapolis, Marion County; 10 March 1933 – 21 December 2005)
  • Leavenworth Arena (Leavenworth, Crawford County; 17 May 1838 – 3 June 1841)
  • Lebanon Daily Reporter (Lebanon, Boone County; 1 January 1917 – 31 December 1917)
  • Lexington Clipper (Lexington, Scott County; 24 June 1858 – 25 December 1858)
  • Lexington Times (Lexington, Scott County; 27 May 1858 – 3 June 1858)
  • Liberty Express (Liberty, Union County; 3 March 1916 – 18 February 1921)
  • Liberty Gazette (Liberty, Union County)
  • Liberty Herald (Plymouth, Marshall County; 16 March 1854 – 10 July 1919)
  • Locomotive (Indianapolis, Marion County; 16 August 1845 – 25 December 1858)
  • Logansport Republican and Indiana Herald (Logansport, Cass County; 26 September 1833 – 19 December 1833)
  • Madison Daily Courier (Madison, Jefferson County; 30 April 1849 – 30 April 1850)
  • Marion Labor Sentinel (Marion, Grant County; 23 April 1914 – 12 November 1914)
  • Marshall County Democrat (Plymouth, Marshall County; 15 November 1855 – 1 December 1859)
  • Marshall County Independent (Plymouth, Marshall County; 26 October 1894 – 29 November 1895)
  • Marshall County Independent (Plymouth, Marshall County; 17 December 1897 – 27 December 1901)
  • Marshall County Republican (Plymouth, Marshall County; 9 October 1856 – 12 December 1878)
  • Microscope and General Advertiser (New Albany, Floyd County; 11 December 1824 – 25 December 1824)
  • Monroe’s Legal Tender Issue (Columbus, Bartholomew County; 30 August 1876 – 11 October 1876)
  • Muncie Post-Democrat (Muncie, Delaware County; 18 February 1921 – 29 December 1950)
  • Muncie Times (Muncie, Delaware County; 10 January 1991 – 25 2011)
  • Name It & Take It (Smithville, Monroe County; 29 May 1897 – 9 July 1897)
  • National Patriot (Centerville; 29 January 1840 – 28 October 1840)
  • Neutral Pennant (Rising Sun, Ohio County; 13 October 1853 – 10 February 1854)
  • New Richmond Record (New Richmond, Montgomery County; 20 September 1900 – 8 July 1915)
  • New-Albany Chronicle (New Albany, Floyd County; 5 May 1821 – 17 November 1821)
  • New-Harmony and Nashoba Gazette, or, Free Enquirer (New Harmony, Posey County)
  • Noblesville Hoosier Patriot (Noblesville, Hamilton County; 8 December 1859 – 26 April 1860)
  • Olive Branch (Rockville, Parke County)
  • Orland Echo (Orland, Steuben County)
  • Orland Zenith (Orland, Steuben County; 6 April 1900 – 10 January 1923)
  • Paoli Weekly News (Paoli, Orange County; 15 November 1876 – 14 May 1879)
  • Parke County Democrat (Rockville, Parke County)
  • Parke County Whig (Rockville, Parke County; 5 May 1848 – 16 May 1851)
  • People’s Advocate (Salem, Washington County)
  • Plain Dealer (Brookville, Franklin County; 5 November 1816 – 12 November 1816)
  • Plymouth Banner (Plymouth, Marshall County; 3 March 1853 – 24 May 1855)
  • Plymouth Democrat (Plymouth, Marshall County; 9 September 1869 – 2 May 1878)
  • Plymouth Journal (Plymouth, Marshall County)
  • Plymouth Pilot (Plymouth, Marshall County; 16 April 1851 – 7 January 1852)
  • Plymouth Republican (Plymouth, Marshall County; 19 December 1878 – 3 October 1901)
  • Plymouth Tribune (Plymouth, Marshall County; 10 October 1901 – 5 January 1911)
  • Plymouth Weekly Banner (Plymouth, Marshall County; 31 May 1855 – 4 September 1856)
  • Plymouth Weekly Democrat (Plymouth, Marshall County; 26 January 1860 – 2 September 1869)
  • Political Beacon (Lawrenceburg, Dearborn County; 7 October 1837 – 30 October 1845)
  • Political Clarion (Connersville, Fayette County; 12 June 1830 – 7 April 1832)
  • Potawattimie & Miami Times (Logansport, Cass County; 10 October 1829 – 24 August 1831)
  • Public Leger (Richmond, Wayne County; 6 March 1824 – 11 June 1828)
  • Randolph County Journal (Winchester, Randolph County; 31 December 1857 – 19 December 1861)
  • Randolph County Journal (Winchester, Randolph County; 1 January 1864 – 17 August 1865)
  • Randolph Journal (Winchester, Randolph County; 11 July 1862 – 26 September 1862)
  • Randolph Journal (Winchester, Randolph County; 20 September 1866 – 27 June 1867)
  • Republican & Banner (Madison, Jefferson County; 26 September 1833 – 16 October 1834)
  • Richmond Palladium (Daily) (21 December 1877 – 10 February 1923)
  • Richmond Palladium (Weekly) (8 January 1831 – 9 December 1875)
  • Richmond Weekly Intelligencer (Richmond, Wayne County; 2 February 1822 – 25 September 1822)
  • Rising Sun Times (Rising Sun, Ohio County; 16 November 1833 – 16 September 1837)
  • Rockville Intelligencer (Rockville, Parke County)
  • Rushville Weekly Republican (Rushville, Rush County; 3 November 1858 – 9 May 1860)
  • Salem Whig (Salem, Washington County)
  • Saturday Evening Mail (Terre Haute, Vigo County; 2 July 1870 – 11 March 1899)
  • Scott County Democrat (Scottsburg, Scott County)
  • Semi-weekly Express (Terre Haute, Vigo County; 3 January 1896 – 31 December 1897)
  • Semi-weekly Independent (Plymouth, Marshall County; 4 December 1895 – 25 April 1896)
  • Semi-Weekly Journal (Indianapolis, Marion County; 26 November 1840 – 16 October 1841)
  • Shelby Volunteer (Shelbville, Shelby County; 17 February 1859 – 8 September 1864)
  • Smithville News (Smithville, Monroe County; 31 July 1908 – 3 April 1914)
  • South Bend News-Times (South Bend, St. Joseph County; 1 July 1913 – 31 December 1922)
  • Southern Indianian (Charlestown, Clark County)
  • Spirit of Progress (Charlestown, Clark County)
  • Standard (Madison, Jefferson New and used mobile homes for sale 6 February 1835 – 31 December 1835)
  • Star-Democrat (Greencastle, Putnam County; 31 August 1906 – 28 March 1913)
  • Sullivan Daily Times (Sullivan, Sullivan County; 4 January 1945 – 5 October 1949)
  • Switzerland Guest (Vevay, Switzerland County; 8 May 1827 – 19 June 1827)
  • Terre Haute Daily Gazette (Terre Haute, Vigo County; 1 June 1870 – 31 October 1872)
  • Terre Haute Daily News (Terre Haute, Vigo County; 30 November 1889 – 21 August 1891)
  • Terre Haute Daily Union (Terre Haute, Vigo County; 20 June 1857 – 11 January 1859)
  • Terre Haute Evening Gazette (Terre Haute, Vigo County; 1 November 1872 – 6 May 1876)
  • Terre Haute Journal (Terre Haute, Vigo County; 5 October 1858 – 7 January 1876)
  • Terre Haute Weekly Gazette (Terre Haute, Vigo County; 9 October 1873 – 15 September 1887)
  • Terre-Haute Daily American (Terre Haute, Vigo County; 5 May 1855 – 29 May 1855)
  • Terre-Haute Journal (Terre Haute, Vigo County; 6 December 1850 – 22 September 1854)
  • Terre-Haute Weekly Express (Terre Haute, Vigo County; 6 March 1867 – 14 August 1872)
  • The Archer (Rensselaer, Jasper County)
  • The Bartholomew Democrat (Columbus, Bartholomew County; 29 September 1871 – 14 April 1876)
  • The Bloomington Hawkeye (Bloomington, Monroe County; 20 January 1881 – 3 March 1881)
  • The Boone County Pioneer (Lebanon, Boone County; 9 July 1858 – 3 February 1860)
  • The Bulletin (Indianapolis, Marion County; 10 January 1920 – 10 July 1920)
  • The Butcher-Knife (Danville, Hendricks County; 2 May 1857 – 17 October 1857)
  • The colored visitor (Logansport, Cass County)
  • The Columbus Bulletin (Columbus, Bartholomew County; 18 September 1868 – 21 October 1870)
  • The Columbus Herald (Columbus, Bartholomew County; 11 December 1896 – 24 June 1910)
  • The Columbus Republican (Columbus, Bartholomew County; 1 August 1872 – 3 September 1874)
  • The Corner Stone (College Corner, Union County; 8 April 1874 – 10 January 1877)
  • The Cresset (New Albany, Floyd County)
  • The Daily Banner (Greencastle, Putnam County; 2 March 1900 – 31 December 1968)
  • The Daily Evening Democrat (Nashville, Brown County)
  • The Daily Evening Democrat (Columbus, Bartholomew County)
  • The Daily News (Franklin, Johnson County)
  • The Dunreith Record (Dunreith, Henry County)
  • The Evening Democrat (Greencastle, Putnam County; 3 August 1896 – 2 November 1896)
  • The Evening Gazette (Franklin, Johnson County; 16 February 1884 – 20 June 1884)
  • The Evening Star (Franklin, Johnson County; 13 July 1885 – 24 August 1914)
  • The Franklin Jacksonian (Franklin, Johnson County; 8 December 1883 – 25 July 1885)
  • The Greencastle Daily Sun (Greencastle, Putnam County; 21 January 1890 – 14 August 1890)
  • The Greencastle Democrat (Greencastle, Putnam County; 27 February 1892 – 30 October 1903)
  • The Greencastle Times (Greencastle, Putnam County; 31 January 1884 – 14 August 1890)
  • The Hendricks County Gazette (Danville, Hendricks County; 13 September 1881 – 17 March 1898)
  • The Hendricks County Union (Plainfield, Hendricks County; 16 February 1865 – 29 January 1874)
  • The Index (Nashville, Brown County)
  • The Indiana Press (Greencastle, Putnam County; 29 May 1858 – 16 August 1865)
  • The Indiana Times (Salem, Washington County)
  • The Indiana Whig (Lawrenceburg, Dearborn County)
  • The Indiana Whig (Lawrenceburg, Dearborn County; 18 April 1834 – 13 September 1834)
  • The Jacksonian (Nashville, Brown County; 1 May 1873 – 30 March 1883)
  • The Knightstown Journal (Knightstown, Henry County; 10 March 1905 – 22 September 1905)
  • The Lafayette Argus (Lafayette, Tippecanoe County; 27 May 1858 – 29 November 1860)
  • The Lafayette Daily Argus (Lafayette, Tippecanoe County)
  • The Lafayette Daily Courier (Lafayette, Tippecanoe County)
  • The Laporte Weekly Times (LaPorte, LaPorte County)
  • The Lewisville Democrat (Lewisville, Henry County; 14 February 1878 – 4 September 1879)
  • The Liberty Review (Liberty, Union County; 5 November 1886 – 30 November 1899)
  • The Little Western (Noblesville, Hamilton County; 13 January 1844 – 25 January 1845)
  • The Madison Daily Times (Madison, Jefferson County)
  • The Marion Socialist (Marion, Grant County; 20 August 1911 – 27 October 1912)
  • The Nashville Union (Nashville, Brown County; 7 August 1862 – 24 December 1863)
  • The New Albany Daily Ledger (New Albany, Floyd County; 22 October 1858 – 17 November 1858)
  • The New Wolcott Enterprise (Wolcott, White County; 27 July 1967 – 31 December 1970)
  • The Newspaper (Noblesville, Hamilton County; 12 January 1837 – 22 March 1838)
  • The People’s Friend (Covington, Fountain County; 25 September 1861 – 8 October 1862)
  • The People’s Pilot (Rensselaer, Jasper County; 19 September 1895 – 13 May 1897)
  • The Prairie Chieftain (Monticello, White County; 17 September 1850 – 23 December 1854)
  • The Rensselaer Journal (Rensselaer, Jasper County)
  • The Rushville Jacksonian (Rushville, Rush County; 2 April 1858 – 23 May 1860)
  • The Scott County Journal (Scottsburg, Scott County)
  • The Times News (Greencastle, Putnam County; 22 November 1933 – 27 December 1934)
  • The Tipton County Argus (Tipton, Tipton County; 2 July 1858 – 10 December 1858)
  • The Union Times (Liberty, Union County; 11 May 1876 – 7 December 1876)
  • The Vernon Banner (Vernon, Jennings County; 25 December 1858 – 5 March 1859)
  • The Vernon Times (Vernon, Jennings County; 5 June 1919 – 23 April 1920)
  • The Versailles Dispatch (Versailles, Ripley County; boone county indiana republican party February 1858 – 31 May 1866)
  • The Wabash Courier (Terre Haute, Vigo County; 21 June 1832 – 27 December 1856)
  • The Western Register and Terre-Haute advertiser (Terre Haute, Vigo County; 21 July 1823 – 25 December 1830)
  • Tocsin (Salem, Washington County; 8 April 1820 – 10 June 1820)
  • Tri-weekly Journal (Evansville, Vanderburgh County; 15 May 1847 – 9 March 1848)
  • Union County Democrat (Liberty, Union County; 22 September 1882 – 24 November 1882)
  • Vevay Times and Switzerland County Democrat (Vevay, Switzerland County; 4 January 1840 – 3 December 1840)
  • Vincennes Gazette (Vincennes, Knox County; 2 October 1830 – 2 October 1845)
  • Wabash Express (Terre Haute, Vigo County; 12 January 1842 – 23 January 1861)
  • Wabash Herald (Rockville, Parke County; 14 May 1831 – 14 April 1832)
  • Wabash Scratches (Lafayette, Tippecanoe County)
  • Wabash Telegraph (Vincennes, Knox County; 25 May 1827 – 21 November 1828)
  • Waynetown Banner (Waynetown)
  • Waynetown Despatch (Waynetown; 8 February 1896 – 25 July 1930)
  • Waynetown Hornet (Waynetown; 28 January 1888 – 11 February 1893)
  • Weekly Indiana State Sentinel (Indianapolis, Marion County; 10 February 1855 – 2 January 1861)
  • Weekly Messenger (Vevay, Switzerland County; 15 September 1831 – 11 February 1837)
  • Weekly News (Rising Sun, Azealia banks braces County; 3 March 1854 – 6 October 1854)
  • Weekly Republican (Plymouth, Marshall County; 12 January 1911 – 2 May 1912)
  • Weekly Reveille (Vevay, Switzerland County; 23 June 1853 – 24 December 1856)
  • Weekly Wabash Express (Terre Haute, Vigo County; 28 January 1863 – 27 February 1867)
  • Western Annotator (Salem, Washington County; 31 May 1828 – 23 October 1834)
  • Western Casket (Scottsburg, Scott County; 26 March 1857 – 14 May 1857)
  • Western Censor, & Emigrants Guide (Indianapolis, Marion County; 4 June 1823 – 22 September 1823)
  • Western Clarion (Madison, Jefferson County; 6 March 1822 – 18 September 1822)
  • Western Commentator (Salem, Washington County)
  • Western Dominion (Tipton, Tipton County)
  • Western Eagle (Madison, Jefferson County; 6 August 1813 – 6 January 1816)
  • Western Emporium (Richmond, Wayne County; 24 April 1824 – 30 April 1825)
  • Western Plough Boy (Greencastle, Putnam County)
  • Western Statesman (Lawrenceburg, Dearborn County; 10 March 1830 – 22 March 1834)
  • Western Sun & General Advertiser (Vincennes, Knox County; 6 December 1817 – 27 December 1834)
  • Western Sun (Vincennes, Knox County; 11 July 1807 – 29 November 1817)
  • Western Times (Richmond, Wayne County; 29 August 1828 – 14 June 1833)
  • Winchester Journal (Winchester, Randolph County; 9 June 1870 – 28 July 1870)
  • Winchester Journal (Winchester, Randolph County; 3 October 1862 – 20 November 1863)
  • Wolcott Beacon (Wolcott, White County; 19 October 1944 – 8 August 1968)

Indiana Legacy (multiple index search)

  • Indiana Gazette
  • Indianapolis Herald
  • Indianapolis Journal
  • Indianapolis News
  • Indianapolis Sentinel
  • Indianapolis Star
  • Indianapolis News
  • Logansport Journal
  • Logansport Weekly Journal
  • Logansport Democratic Pharos
  • New Albany Ledger and Standard
  • Western Sun

INSPIRE Collection (Must be Indiana Resident)

  • Angola – Angola Herald (1877-1963)
  • Angola – Steuben Republican (1860-1964)
  • Argos boone county indiana republican party Argos Reflector (1881-1966)
  • Brazil – Brazil Daily Times (1907-1964)
  • Bremen – Bremen Daily Enquirer (1891-1892)
  • Bremen – Bremen Enquirer (1885-1964)
  • Bristol – Bristol Banner (1877-1919)
  • Brook – Brook Reporter (1895-1964)
  • Brook – Brookville American (1865-1932)
  • Brook – Brookville Democrat (1896-1956)
  • Charlestown – Charlestown Courier (1941-1964)
  • Clinton – Clinton Daily Clintonian (1935-1954)
  • Columbia City – Columbia City Commercial-Mail (1951-1964)
  • Culver – Culver Citizen (1903-1964)
  • Edinburg – Edinburg Daily Courier (1877-1963)
  • Evansville – Evansville Press (1906-1927)
  • Fairmont – Fairmount News (1888-1964)
  • Fort Wayne – Fort Wayne Daily Gazette (1864-1899)
  • Fort Wayne – Fort Wayne Daily News (1874-1923)
  • Fort Wayne – Fort Wayne Journal-Gazette (1873-1923)
  • Fort Wayne – Fort Wayne Weekly Gazette (1895-1903)
  • Fort Wayne – Fort Wayne Weekly Journal (1890-1899)
  • Fort Wayne – Fort Wayne Weekly Sentinel (1875-1917)
  • Fort Wayne – Fort Wayne Sentinel (1870-1923)
  • Franklin – Evening Star (1912-1919)
  • Franklin – Franklin Evening Star (1920-1966)
  • Garrett – Garrett Clipper (1885-1964)
  • Garrett – Garrett News (1876-1901)
  • Greenfield – Greenfield Daily Reporter (1905-2017)
  • Greenfield – Fcbc worship Democrat (1860-1957)
  • Logansport – Logansport Pharos-Tribune (1890-2006)

County and Library Collections:

Allen County Public Library Newspaper Archives

Berne Public Library

  • Adams County Daily Witness
  • Adams County Witness
  • The Adams County Sun and Berne Daily Witness
  • The Berne Review
  • The Berne Tri-Weekly
  • The Berne Witness

Carroll County Newspaper Archives

Dearborn County Newspaper Index

  • Aurora Dearborn County Democrat (1838-1840)
  • Aurora Western Commercial (1848-1851)
  • Aurora Standard (1851-1856)
  • Aurora Commercial (1859-1868)
  • Aurora Peoples Advocate (1868-1870)
  • Aurora Dearborn Independent (1868-1917)
  • Aurora Farmer and Mechanic (1873-1874)
  • Aurora Saturday News (1879-1880)
  • Aurora Spectator (1882-1893)
  • Aurora Saturday Bulletin (1894-1899)
  • Lawrenceburg Indiana Oracle (1820-1823)
  • Lawrenceburg Indiana Spectator (1824-1825)
  • Lawrenceburg Indiana Palladium (1825-1836)
  • Lawrenceburg Western Statesman (1830-1834)
  • Lawrenceburg Political Beacon (1837-1845)
  • Lawrenceburg Indiana Whig (1834, 1844)
  • Lawrenceburg Standard and Press (1856-1857)
  • Lawrenceburg Register (1877-1889)
  • Wilmington Dearborn County Register (1842)

Evansville Historic Newspaper Index

  • Evansville Enquirer
  • Evansville Gazette
  • Evansville Weekly Journal
  • Evansville Tri-Weekly Journal
  • Evansville Daily Journal

Hamilton County Newspaper Database (index)

Howard County Memory Project

  • Greentown Gem
  • Greentown Grapevine

Knox County Public Library

  • Vincennes Sun-Commercial
  • Sunday Commercial 
  • Vincennes Commercial
  • Sunday Vincennes
  • Daily Commercial
  • Commercial Vincennes
  • Vincennes Daily Commercial 
  • Sunday Daily Commercial
  • Daily Vincennes Commercial 
  • Vincennes Times 
  • Vincennes Weekly Sun 
  • Weekly Western Sun 
  • Western Sun
  • Western Sun and General Advertiser
  • The Vincennes Commercial 
  • The Vincennes Sun Commercial
  • The Vincennes Sun
  • The Vincennes Sun-Commercial
  • Vincennes Sun – Commercial
  • Vincennes Sun Commercial

Logansport Newspaper Archives

New Albany – Floyd County Public Library Newspaper Index  (Index only)

Ohio County – Rising Sun Newspaper Index 1833-1860

  • Hoosier Patriot (1852)
  • Indiana Democrat (1858)
  • Indiana Oasis (1878)
  • Indiana Weekly Visitor (1857-1860)
  • Indiana Whig (1848-1850)
  • Neutral Pennant (1853-1854)
  • Rising Sun (1833-1834)
  • Rising Sun Mirror (1849-1851)
  • Rising Sun Times (1834-1837)
  • True Whig (1850)
  • Weekly Times (1854)

St. Joseph County Public Library Newspapers

  • Clay Township News
  • New Era
  • Reformer
  • River Park Free Press
  • South Bend Herald
  • South Bend Mirror
  • South Bend Today
  • The Farm News

Tipton County Newspaper Archives

Switzerland County – Vevay Newspaper Index

  • Campaign Palladium (1848)
  • Daily Bulletin (1876)
  • Independent Examiner (1824)
  • Indiana Palladium (1843-1851)
  • Indiana Register (1817-1825)
  • Indiana Reveille (1857-1860, 1864)
  • Ohio Valley Gazette (1851-1853)
  • Reveille and News (1861)
  • Switzerland Guest (1827)
  • Vevay Democrat (1868-1898)
  • Vevay Reveille (1862-1863, 1865-1901)
  • Vevay Times and Switzerland County Democrat (1840)
  • Village Times (1836-1837)
  • Weekly Messenger (1831-1837)
  • Weekly Times (1856-1860)
  • Weekly Reveille (1853-1856)

Washington Public Library Newspaper Archives

Student Collections:

Anderson University – Anderson

Arsenal Technical School – Indianapolis

Ball State University – Muncie

Bethel University – Mishawaka

Bishop Chatard High School – Indianapolis

Burris Laboratory School – Muncie

Butler University – Indianapolis

Calumet College of St Joseph – Whiting

Carmel High School – Carmel

Center School – Muncie

Depauw University – Greencastle

Earlham College – Richmond

Franklin College – Franklin

Goshen College – Goshen

Grace College – Winona Lake

Hanover College – Hanover

Huntington University – Huntington

Indiana Boys School – Plainfield

Indiana School for the Deaf – Indianapolis

Indiana State University – Terre Haute

Indiana University – Bloomington

Indiana University – Kokomo

Indiana University – Purdue University – Fort Wayne

Indiana University – Purdue University – Indianapolis

Indiana University – South Bend

Indiana University Southeast – New Albany

Indiana Wesleyan University – Marion

Jefferson High School – Lafayette

John Adams High School – South Bend

John Marshall High School – Indianapolis

Lawrence North High School – Indianapolis

Manchester University – North Manchester

Marian University – Indianapolis

New Albany High School – New Albany

North Central High School – Indianapolis

Notre Dame University – South Bend

Purdue University – West Lafayette

Purdue University Northwest – Hammond

Purdue University Northwest – Westville

Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology – Terre Haute

Saint Joseph’s College – Rensselaer

Shortridge High School – Indianapolis

Southport High School – Indianapolis

Thomas Carr Howe High School – Indianapolis

Trine University – Angola

University of Evansville – Evansville

University of Indianapolis – Indianapolis

University of Southern Indiana – Evansville

Valparaiso University – Valparaiso

Wabash College – Crawfordsville

Miscellaneous Collections and Indexes:

Independent Voices – Alternative Newspapers

  • Aerospaced
  • The Spectator
  • First Amendment
  • Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow

Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) Newspapers 1933-1942

Indiana State Library Civilian Conservation Corps Newsletters

  • Boundary Hill Beacon (Co. 1596, Brookville, Franklin County) 
  • Camp Chatter of Company 517 (Co. 517, Brownstown, Jackson County)
  • Camp Clark Comet (Co. 1599, Henryville, Clark County) 
  • Camp Clifty Clarion (Co. 1597, Madison, Jefferson County)
  • Camp Eagle (Co. 1598, Wadesville, Posey County)
  • Cardinal (Co. 596, Versailles, Ripley County) 
  • Ditch Dots and Dashes (Co. 517, South Bend, St Joseph Co, and Portland, Jay County)
  • Eroder’s Camp Weekly (Co. 1511, Boonville, Warrick County)
  • Flying Chips (Co. 515, Martinsville, Morgan County)
  • Frankton Weekly (Co. 1585, Frankton, Madison County)
  • Hoosier Civie (Fort Benjamin Harrison, Marion County)
  • Hoosier Dunesman (Co. 556, Chesteron, Porter County)
  • Hoosier Kernels (Co. 2583, Tell City, Perry County)
  • Idle Hours (Co. 1583, Frankton, Madison County)
  • Kokomo Klarion (Co. 1581, Kokomo, Howard County)
  • Lintonian C.O.P. (Co. 2582, Linton, Greene County)
  • Madison Sector News (Co. 514, Henryville, Jefferson County)
  • News from C.C.C. Company 539 (Co. 539, Evansville, Vanderburgh County)
  • No-Now (Co. 1582, Monon, White County)
  • Peru Pitter Patter (Co. 3550, Peru, Miami County)
  • Princeton Prattle (Co. 3550, Princeton, Gibson County)
  • Ripley Veteran (Co. 3564, Versailles, Ripley County)
  • Robin Hood Bugle (Co. 1596, South Bend, St. Joseph County)
  • Sand Hill Bulletin (Co. 1561, Medaryville, Pulaski County)
  • Smile’s Weekly (Co. 1590, Fort Wayne, Allen County)
  • The 539 Journal (Co. 539, Evansville, Vanderburgh County)
  • The Arrow (Co. 596, Versailles, Ripley County)
  • The Call Master (Co. 1589, Wadesville, Posey County)
  • The Camp Jackson Blatter (Co. 1556, Brownstown, Jackson County) 
  • The Candlelight (Co. 1592, Corydon, Harrison Co. and Bluffton, Wells County) 
  • The Canyon Echo (Co. 689, Spencer, Owen County)
  • The Cavalier (Co. 1593, Worthington, Greene County)
  • The Chronicle (Co. 2582, Linton, Greene County)
  • The Comet (Co. 1582, Monon, White County)
  • The Englishton Eagle (Co. 2585, Lexington, Scott County)
  • The Fort Ben Banner (Co. 3550, Fort Benjamin Harrison, Marion County)
  • The Hilltop Observer (Co. 1561, Nashville, Brown County)
  • The Lagrozette (Co. 589, Lagro, Wabash County)
  • The Limberlost Ledger (Co. 2585, Kendallville, Noble County)
  • The Little America Flash (Co. 1594, Kurtz, Jackson County)
  • The Mud Turtle (Co. 1590, Fort Wayne, Allen County)
  • The Muskrat (Co. 1589, Lebanon, Boone County)
  • The Pokagon Chieftain (Co. 556, Angola, Steuben County)
  • The Pokagon Papoose (Co. 556, Angola, Steuben County)
  • The Princeton Builder (Co. 556, Angola, Gibson County)
  • The Resurrector (Co. 1598, Wadesville, Posey County)
  • The Robin (Co. 1596, South Bend, St. Joseph County)
  • The Salamonian (Co. 589, Largo, Wabash County) 
  • The Salamonie Chow Bell (Co. 589, Largo, Wabash County) 
  • The Sandlander (Co. 515, Medaryville, Pulaski County)
  • The Screw Driver (Co. 586, Freetown, Jackson County)
  • The Spring Mill Reveille (Co. 539. Mitchell, Lawrence County)
  • The Stripper-Lite (Co. 2582, Linton, Greene County)
  • The Tecumseh Tattler (Co. 1587, Lafayette, Tippecanoe County)
  • The Washington Beacon (Co. 559, Washington, Daviess County)
  • The Weed Patch Vet Varieties (Co. 1557, Nashville, Brown County)
  • Turkey Run Flash (Co. 2580, Marshall, Parke County)
  • Valpo Vane (Co. 1583, Valparaiso, Porter County)
  • Vets Defense Chronicle (Co. 3564, Nashville, Brown County)
  • Wyandotte Wahoo (Co. 517, South Bend, St. Joseph County)

Indiana – Company Employee Newsletters/Newspapers

  • Ayrograms (L. S. Ayres & Company, Indianapolis)
  • Bell Telephone News (Indiana Bell Telephone Co., Indianapolis)
  • Bendixline (Bendix Aviation Corporation, South Bend)
  • Block’s Booster (The Wm. H. Block Company, Indianapolis)
  • Blue Star/Lens Life (Continental Optical Co., Indianapolis)
  • Cabidea Courier (Haynes Stellite Co., Kokomo)
  • Calumet Service (Calumet Gas and Electric Company, Gary)
  • Chain Gang: F.D.C. News Letter (Diamond Chain Mfg. Co., Indianapolis) 
  • Columbia Cauldron (Columbia Conserve Company, Indianapolis) 
  • Delco-Remy Clan (Delco-Remy Division of General Motors, Anderson)
  • Dodge News (Dodge Manufacturing Corp., Mishawaka) 
  • Gary Works Circle (Gary Works, Illinois Steel Co., Gary)
  • Guide Light (Guide Lamp Division of General Motors, Anderson)
  • Kingan Folks (Kingan and Company, Indianapolis)
  • Magnavoice (Magnavox, Fort Wayne)
  • Malleable News (National Malleable and Steel Castings Co., Indianapolis)
  • Mallory Life (P.R. Mallory and Co., Indianapolis)
  • News in General (The General Tire and Rubber Company, Wabash)
  • Peerless (Peerless of America, Inc., Marion)
  • Safety (Union Traction Co. of Indiana, Indianapolis)
  • Scraps (The Diamond Chain and Manufacturing Co., Indianapolis) 
  • Servel Inklings (Servel, Inc., Evansville) 
  • Spirit of the Nation (Commercial Solvents Corporation, Terre Haute) 
  • Stanolind Record (Standard Oil Company (Indiana), Whiting)
  • Stewart-Warner Reporter (Stewart-Warner Corporation, Indianapolis) 
  • Studebaker Spotlight (The Studebaker Corp., South Bend)
  • Terre Haute’s Onizette (Owens Illinois Glass Co., Plant 25, Terre Haute)
  • The Aluminator (Lafayette Works, Aluminum Co. of America, Lafayette)
  • The Bullet (Chrysler Corp., Evansville)
  • The Cabinetmaker (Singer Mfg. Co., South Bend)
  • The Circle (Perfect Circle Co., Hagerstown)
  • The Continental (Continental Foundry and Machine Co., East Chicago)
  • The Gold Star (Lone Star Cement Co., Greencastle)
  • The Boone county indiana republican party News (Kuhner Packing Company, Muncie, Fort Wayne) 
  • The McQuay-Way (McQuay-Norris Manufacturing Co., Connersville) 
  • The Pantagraph (Chicago South Shore and South Bend Railroad, Michigan City) 
  • The Rex Top-ics (Rex Manufacturing Company, Connersville)
  • The Try-Square (Vonnegut Hardware Co., Indianapolis)
  • U.S. Hoosiers (United States Rubber Company, Indianapolis)
  • Vitreous Views (Vitreous Steel Products Company, Nappanee)
  • Wayne Knit Rav-lings (Wayne Knit Co., Fort Wayne) 

Small Town Papers

Old Fulton Postcards

  • Greencastle IN Banner and Times
  • Indianapolis IN Daily State Sentinel
  • Indianapolis IN Evening News

The Olden Times – Indiana

Newspaper Abstracts – Indiana

For Obituary Indexes, transcriptions, and other death/obituary information from historic newspapers, please check out the Obituaries page.

Other Free Sites:

Anderson

Evansville

Huntington

Indianapolis

Lafayette

Logansport

Merrillville and Gary

Muncie

New Garden

Richmond

Smithville

South Bend

South Bend and Fort Wayne

Subscription or Pay Sites:

Ancestry.com:

There are currently 54 publications available at this site. See all the titles at Ancestry – Indiana Newspapers

Genealogy Bank:

There are currently 246 publications available at this site. See all the titles at Genealogy Bank – Indiana Newspapers

Newspaper Archive:

There are currently 1,058 publications available at this site. See all the titles at Newspaper Archive – Indiana

Newspapers.com:

There are currently 240 publications available at this site. See all the titles at Newspapers.com – Indiana

And Finally:

You also need to check out the Indiana State Librarysite, which can tell you what is happening in the state with regard to the newspapers that have been digitized and are becoming available via microfilm or online. 

Please note – even more may be available via a local library where a library card is required. And of course there is always microfilm for those that have not been made available online as yet.

Good Luck and Happy Hunting!

For more links for different states, provinces, and countries – please see the Newspaper Linkspage on this website.

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Источник: https://theancestorhunt.com/blog/indiana-online-historical-newspapers-summary/
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Watchdog Lebanon Home Page

Brigham Young, first Governor of the Territory of Utah, from 1850–1858

Named governor in 1850 by Millard Fillmore, he was reappointed in 1854 by Franklin Pierce when Lt. Col. Edward J. Steptoe refused the post. Young as territorial executive was concerned with organizing the territorial government, selecting the location of the capital and building a territorial statehouse, codification of laws, organizing and establishing a territorial library, normalizing relations with the Indians and between the federal government and the Mormons, and developing home manufacturing and agriculture. Acting on rumors that the Mormons were rebelling against federal authority, James Buchanan replaced Young as governor in 1857.

Governor Young was born in 1801, and died in 1877.


Alfred Cumming

Second Governor of the Territory of Utah, from 1858–1861
Democratic Party

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Born in Sand Hills, Georgia, in 1802, Cumming served in federal, military, and civic posts, including mayor of Augusta, Georgia, before his appointment as governor in July 1857 by James Buchanan. Accompanied by his wife, Elizabeth W. Randall, he was escorted to Utah by a large force under Col. Albert Sidney Johnston. En route, in January 1858, he was reappointed to a full term as governor. On orders of Brigham Young, Salt Lake City was almost abandoned when he arrived. Cumming was determined to avoid violence, and the so-called Utah War was quickly settled. Cumming’s concerns as governor included the unusual powers of the local probate courts; Indians; construction of roads and bridges; the sale of public lands; mail service; lawlessness, including cattle rustling and murder; and poor penal conditions. He left Utah in May 1861, knowing that Republican Abraham Lincoln would not reappoint him. He died in Augusta, Georgia, in 1873.


John W. Dawson

Third Governor of the Territory of Utah, 1861
Republican/Democratic Party

https www t online de login in 1820, a native of Cambridge, Indiana, Dawson married Amanda Thornton and was a lawyer, farmer, and newspaper editor before entering politics as a KnowNothing. He later was a Democrat, and finally a Republican. Abraham Lincoln named him governor in 1861. Antagonistic toward the Mormons and despised by them, Dawson left for the East after fulton ny weather 10 day than a month in Utah, and was attacked and beaten as he traveled through Parley’s Canyon. Three men allegedly involved in the assault were later killed by law officers. Dawson died in 1877 in Indiana.

See also: Tribune article, “Third Governor Was Run Out of Utah After 3 Weeks”


Stephen Selwyn Boone county indiana republican party Governor of the Territory of Utah from 1862–1863
Republican Party

A native of Ontario County, New York, and an ardent abolitionist, Harding married Avoline Sprout and practiced law in Indiana before Abraham Lincoln named him governor of the Utah Territory in 1862. Conciliatory toward the Mormons at first, he soon became critical of church leaders and the practice of polygamy. The Mormons successfully petitioned for his removal. He served as chief justice of the Colorado Territory until forced out of office for alleged incompetence and immorality.

Governor Harding was born in 1808 and died in 1891, in Indiana.


James Duane Doty

Fifth Governor of the Territory of Utah from 1863–1865
Democratic Party

Born in Salem, New York, in 1799, Doty married Sarah Collins and served in several government posts in Michigan before moving to Wisconsin, where he was a delegate to Congress, territorial governor (1841–44), and state legislator. Originally a Democrat, he became a Free Soiler and then a Republican.  Abraham Lincoln named him superintendent of Indian affairs for Utah in 1861 and then to the vacated position of governor in 1863. Under his skillful management, federal relations with the Mormons improved. He emphasized the importance of schools and Indian treaties, and suggested using the Colorado River to transport Utah products to markets in California. Reappointed by Lincoln, he died in office in 1865 and was buried in the Fort Douglas cemetery.

Governor Doty was born in 1799.


Charles Durkee

Sixth Governor of the Territory of Utah from 1865–1869
Liberal/Republican Party

A native of Royalton, Vermont, born in 1805, Durkee became a business, civic, and political leader in Wisconsin, serving as territorial legislator, congressman, and U.S. senator (1855–61), affiliated at various times with the Liberty, Free Soil, and Republican parties. Appointed governor in 1865, Durkee pursued an energetic course oriented toward territorial development and harmony with the Mormons, although he was critical of the lack of public schools. He returned to Wisconsin in late 1869 and died in 1870 in Omaha.


John Wilson Shaffer

Seventh Governor of the State of Utah, in 1870
Republican Party

He was born boone county indiana republican party Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, in 1827, but little else is known of his early life. Brevetted brigadier general in the Union Army, he was active in Republican politics in Illinois before Ulysses S. Grant named him governor of Utah in 1870. He was determined to carry out Grant’s policy of crushing “rebellion” in the territory, a stance that brought him into conflict with other officials. Among other things, Shaffer attempted to neutralize the Nauvoo Legion by  proscribing military drills and gatherings. He died suddenly in Salt Lake City the year of his arrival. Following Masonic rites, his body was sent to Illinois for burial.


Vernon H. Vaughan

Eighth Governor of the State of Utah from 1870–1871
Republican Party

Born in Alabama, in 1838, Vaughan was Territorial Secretary in Utah when Governor Shaffer died. Ulysses S. Grant named him to fill the vacancy. The only event of consequence during his administration was the Wooden Gun Rebellion—an illegal (according to Shaffer’s proclamation) drill in November 1870 by members of the Nauvoo Legion. Undoubtedly a lark, the incident nevertheless resulted in the arrest and trial of those involved, but all were released. Vaughan was not reappointed. He died in 1878 in Sacramento.


George Lemuel Woods

Ninth Governor of the Territory of Utah, from 1871–1875
Republican Party

Born in Boone County, Missouri, in 1832, Woods moved with his family to Oregon, where he attended school. He prospected for gold and practiced law before entering politics. A founder of the Republican party in Oregon, he was named to the Idaho Territory Supreme Court in 1865 and ran successfully for governor of Oregon in 1866. When Woods failed to win renomination, Ulysses S. Grant named him governor of Utah in 1871. Woods saw the Nauvoo Legion as a threat to federal authority, and he also criticized the unusually broad jurisdiction of locally controlled probate courts. He urged the establishment of free public schools, comprehensive mining legislation, the abolition of polygamy, further railroad development, and federal funds to improve irrigation. He was not reappointed, however, and returned to practicing law. He died in Portland, Oregon, in 1890.


Samuel Beach Axtell

Tenth Governor of the Territory of Utah, 1875
Democratic Party

Born near Columbus, Ohio, in 1819, Axtell attended Oberlin and Western Reserve Colleges, married Adaline S. Williams, practiced law in Michigan and California, and served in Congress (1867-71) as both a Democrat and a Republican. Ulysses S. Grant named him governor of Utah Territory in 1875. More moderate than his immediate predecessors, he was harshly criticized by the growing anti-Mormon element in Utah. After only a few months in Utah, he was sent by Grant to New Mexico Territory as governor and was later chief justice there. He died in 1891 in Morristown, New Jersey.


George W. Emery

Eleventh Governor of the Territory of Utah, from 1875–1880

Born in 1830 in Penobscot, Maine, Emery graduated from Dartmouth, studied law in Albany, New York, and was a federal tax collector in the South before Ulysses S. Grant named him governor of Utah Territory in 1875. Despite the bitter Mormon-Gentile feud of the late nineteenth century, Emery accomplished election reforms and expanded government services for a fast-growing population. When President Grant visited Utah in October 1875 he was amazed at his friendly reception and reportedly told Emery he had been deceived about the Mormons. In February 1880, after Emery’s term had ended, the legislature named a new county in central Utah after him. He died in 1909 in Marshfield, Massachusetts.


Eli Houston Murray

Twelfth Governor of the Territory of Utah, from 1880–1886

A native of Cloverport, Kentucky, born in 1843, Murray attained the rank of brigadier general during the Civil War and also completed a law degree at the University of Louisville. He married Evelyn Neal and was a U.S. marshal and newspaper editor before Rutherford B. Hayes named him governor in 1880. Murray certified the election of Allen G. Campbell (who never served) as delegate to Congress, although George Q. Cannon, an LDS church leader and a polygamist, received more than ten times as many votes. Murray’s attacks on the Mormons influenced national policy. Following the Cannon incident, twenty-three bills dealing with polygamy were introduced in Congress. Chester A. Arthur reappointed Murray, but Grover Cleveland dismissed him in 1886. Murray worked as a journalist in San Diego before returning to Kentucky. He died in Bowling Green in 1896. The city of Murray in Salt Lake County is named for him.


Caleb Walton West

Thirteenth Governor of the Territory of Utah, from 1886–1888 and 1893–1896
Democratic Party

Born in Cynthiana, Kentucky, in 1844, West attended Millersburg Academy and served in the Confederate Army, incarcerated most of the time as a prisoner of war. He married Nancy Frazer. A lawyer and a municipal judge, he was selected by Grover Cleveland to replace Eli Murray in 1886. A moderate Democrat—the first Democratic governor since Alfred Cumming—he visited imprisoned polygamists, but his offer of conditional amnesty was refused. He encouraged the organization of groups such as the Salt Lake Chamber of Commerce that would serve broad community interests and include all elements of society. His first term ended with the election of Benjamin Harrison in 1888, but he returned as governor in 1893 following the re-election of Cleveland. By then the Woodruff Manifesto of 1890 had ended church-sanctioned polygamy, and national political parties had replaced the old Peoples (Mormon) party and Liberal (non-Mormon) party. In January 1896 the governorship passed from West to Heber M. Wells, the first state governor. West was a special agent for the U.S. Treasury on the West Coast until 1901. He died in 1909.


Arthur Lloyd Thomas

Fourteenth Governor of the Territory of Utah, from 1889–1893
Republican Party

Born in 1851 in Chicago, Thomas grew up in Pittsburgh and married Helena Reinberg. He filled staff positions in the U.S. House of Representatives before serving as territorial secretary under governors Emery, Murray, and West. A member of the Utah Commission, he was named governor in 1889 by Benjamin Harrison. Regarding the Mormons, Thomas seemed ambivalent, favoring first the harsh measures in the Cullom Bill and, later, amnesty for convicted polygamists. Improved education for children and the development of irrigation to open more land for settlement were two of his major concerns. An unsuccessful candidate for the Republican nomination for the first state governor in 1895, Thomas remained in Utah as postmaster of Salt Lake City from 1898 to 1914, and was also involved in land development, mining, and publishing. He died in Salt Lake City in 1924.


Источник: https://historytogo.utah.gov/territorial-governors/

Alabama

Montgomery: The city is planning a week of events to commemorate the 66th anniversary of the Montgomery Bus Boycott. In 1955, a dedicated group of people began standing firm against racist segregation in a boycott that spanned 382 days. Activities and events starting Dec. 1 will take place across the city that are designed to honor those who dedicated and risked their lives. This event is being led by Mayor Steven L. Reed, who recently stood with civil rights attorney Fred Gray to expunge the arrest record for Claudette Colvin. While the bus boycott was officially sparked by the arrest of Rosa Parks for refusing to give up her bus seat to a white man, Colvin was arrested months earlier for the same thing. A unity breakfast will be held Dec. 1 at St. Paul AME Church, and the Rosa Parks Museum will offer free admission all day on the anniversary of her arrest. Free tours of the apartment where she lived from 1951 to 1957 will also be available through the Montgomery Housing Authority. Items inside the home have been preserved or recreated to showcase where many important meetings were held during the civil rights movement. For a full list of activities and events throughout the day next Wednesday and beyond, see mgmbusboycott.com.

Alaska

Anchorage: A man charged with threatening the lives of the state’s two U.S. senators pleaded not guilty Monday, and a judge decided he will remain in custody. Jason Weiner, an attorney for Jay Allen Johnson, entered the plea on his client’s behalf during Johnson’s arraignment in U.S. District Court in Fairbanks. Johnson, from the small community of Delta Junction, was indicted last week on six criminal counts – including threatening to murder a U.S. official, being a felon in possession of firearms, threatening to destroy property by fire and threatening interstate communications. The government is also seeking to confiscate two pistols, three revolvers, a rifle and a shotgun found on Johnson’s rural Alaska property because he is a felon who is not legally allowed to possess firearms. If convicted, Johnson could face a maximum sentence of 50 years in prison and $1.5 million in fines, assistant U.S. Attorney Ryan Tansey said. Johnson, at an earlier hearing, said he is “a senior citizen, and I am highly disabled, and I will not be carrying out any of these threats.” Johnson’s wife testified during a detention hearing in October that her husband was was in pain after recent surgeries and “gets very angry listening to politics on the news.”

Arizona

Phoenix: Volunteers gave out hundreds of free Thanksgiving turkeys Monday as the holidays approach and charities work to help people get what they need to celebrate. The event at the American Legion’s Post No. 65 in south Phoenix helped out about 1,000 families. The 18th Annual Thanksgiving Turkey Giveaway was organized by the Sons of the American Legion and the nonprofit HeroZona Foundation. Gov. Doug Ducey Ducey stopped by to help and said in a statement that he was grateful to the volunteers and community groups that came together to help needy families. “It took teamwork to persevere through all the challenges of COVID-19, and events like the Thanksgiving Turkey Giveaway show us all that Arizona will have that same sense of camaraderie for decades to come,” Ducey said. The governor’s office said about 50 volunteers joined AP Powell, HeroZona’s founding chairman, to hand out the free food. Powell said the group wanted to ensure that “underserved families in South Phoenix have the opportunity to enjoy Thanksgiving with their loved ones – no matter their circumstances.” Charities and nonprofit groups routinely ramp up their efforts around the holidays to provide food and holiday gifts to low-income Arizonans.

Arkansas

Little Rock: A longtime legislator who left the Republican Party earlier this year following the Jan. 6 attack at the U.S. Capitol says he won’t run for reelection next year in the state Senate. Sen. Jim Hendren announced Monday that he would not seek another term representing northwest Arkansas. Hendren is a former president of the state Senate who has served in the chamber since 2013. Previously, he had served in the state House of Representatives from 1995 until 1999. He is the nephew of Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson. Hendren left the GOP in February, citing the deadly riot at the Capitol and then-President Donald Trump’s rhetoric. In his announcement Monday, Hendren did not offer specifics on his future plans but said he planned to do more work with his nonprofit, Common Ground Arkansas. “Of course, that drive to serve isn’t gone,” he said in a statement. “I believe Common Ground has real solutions for Arkansas, and I’m dedicated to helping us build a more unified future together.”

California

Long Beach: The ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles have again postponed imposing fees on containers left on docks too long, citing progress in moving the cargo from marine terminals. The decision was made after a meeting Monday among the U.S. port envoy, John D. Porcari; industry stakeholders; and officials of the adjacent ports, the Port of Long Beach said in a press release. The “container dwell fee” will now not be considered before Nov. 29. “Since the fee was announced on Oct. 25, the two ports have seen a decline of 33% combined in aging cargo on the docks,” the statement said. “The executive directors of both ports are satisfied with the progress thus far and will reassess fee implementation after another week of monitoring data.” The fee was imposed by the harbor commissions of both ports as a measure to help ease congestion that has left dozens of ships waiting offshore.

Colorado

Denver: The president of a suburban police union has been placed on paid administrative leave by the police department after he sent an email to the group’s 240 members calling diversity provisions in an agreement between the city and the state “sexist and racist.” Officer Doug Wilkinson sent the email Nov. 16 and was placed on leave the following day after multiple officers complained to human resources, Lt. Chris Amsler, an aide to Aurora Police Chief Vanessa Wilson, told KCNC-TV. “To match the ‘diversity’ of ‘the community’ we could make sure to hire 10% illegal aliens, 50% weed smokers, 10% crackheads, and a few child molesters and murderers to round it out. You know, so we can make the department look like the ‘community,’ ” Wilkinson wrote in the email. The email was prompted by an agreement announced the same day that set up reforms for the Aurora police and fire departments. The consent decree followed a lengthy state investigation that found a pattern of racist policing and excessive use of force. It calls for updated hiring practices so the police and fire departments better reflect the city’s racial makeup. Wilkinson told KCNC-TV his missive was intended to be “a private email message to the members” and should not have been made public.

Connecticut

Hartford: The state is ramping up efforts to get older residents COVID-19 booster shots by bringing special clinics to nursing homes, Gov. Ned Lamont announced Monday. The move comes as the state has seen its highest infection rates since early September. While many homes had boosters administered shortly after extra vaccine doses received the federal go-ahead, these latest clinics will help those facilities that haven’t finished getting residents and eligible staff another dose. “What we’re talking about now is some of the stragglers. As we’ve seen in the past, unfortunately some homes take a little longer to get organized. And so Dr. Juthani and her team are pushing those homes hard to get those clinics done and making sure that everyone in those homes who is eligible (gets a booster shot),” said Josh Geballe, Lamont’s chief operating officer, referring to Department of Public Health Commissioner Manisha Juthani. Over the past two weeks, the rolling average number of daily new coronavirus cases in Connecticut has risen by 397, an increase of about 117%, according to researchers at Johns Hopkins. Juthani said the state is on target to have had a booster clinic for residents and staff at 70% of long-term care facilities, including assisted living locations, by Thanksgiving. She said the rest will be finished by Dec. 15.

Delaware

The Rev. Al Sharpton meets with supporters after a press conference Monday outside Legislative Hall in Dover, Del., to support the passage of SB 149 to make police disciplinary records public and create community review boards with police oversight.

Dover: At a rally Monday, the Rev. Al Sharpton called on lawmakers to open police up to public scrutiny via the controversial Law Enforcement Officers’ Bill of Rights and lambasted the state for its handling of officer-involved shootings. “It seemed to me ironic, if not insulting, as I was coming in that you have the nerve to name a street after Martin Luther King while the people of Dr. King are being abused by police, and you will not hold them accountable,” Sharpton said outside Legislative Hall. He spoke alongside police reform activists Lakeisha Nix, sister of Lymond Moses, shot and killed by New Castle County police earlier this year; Keandra McDole, sister of Jeremy McDole, a Black man in a wheelchair who was shot and killed by Wilmington police in 2015; and Blaine Hackett, a pastor at St. John African Methodist Church Inc. Sharpton and the local activists criticized Delaware for upholding the decades-old Bill of Rights law that lets police decide how to discipline bad-acting officers and limits how much the public can know about any punishment. The rally, hosted by quasi-grassroots advocacy company Citizens for a Pro-Business Delaware, was held in favor of legislation to amend the Officers’ Bill of Rights by opening up internal affairs records to the public and striking out certain provisions about how officers may be investigated.

District of Columbia

Washington: The regional train system serving the capital region will remain on drastically reduced service levels through at least the end of this year, as authorities grapple with a safety problem that has forced the majority of the trains out of service. Paul J. Wiedefeld, general manager of the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority, announced Monday that there were no set timelines for the return of the 7000-series train cars to service. The trains are the newest in service, and the 748 cars compose about 60% of the fleet. The Metro authority’s safety commission abruptly ordered the withdrawal of the entire 7000-series line of trains in mid-October after a derailing revealed chronic problems with the wheels and axles. “We are intentionally not setting deadlines so that safety and good data drive our decisions, but we are mindful that customers want the best service we can provide as soon as we can deliver it, and we are committed to building back up in phases,” Wiedefeld said in a statement Monday. The original plans to bring older 6000-series trains out of retirement to help fill in the service gaps have been delayed by the global supply chain crisis, which has prevented the arrival of necessary parts.

Florida

Fort Lauderdale: The families of most of those killed and wounded in a 2018 high school massacre have reached a multimillion-dollar settlement with the federal government over the FBI’s failure to stop the gunman even though it had received information he intended to attack. Attorneys for 16 of the 17 killed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland and some of those wounded said Monday that they have reached a monetary settlement with the government over the FBI’s failure to investigate a tip it received about a month before the massacre. The 17th family chose not to sue. The attorneys said the settlement’s details are confidential, but a person familiar with the deal, speaking on condition of anonymity, said the government will pay the families $127.5 million overall. “It has been an honor to represent the Parkland families who, through their immeasurable grief, have devoted themselves to making the world a safer place,” their lead attorney, Kristina Infante, said in a statement. Andrew Pollack, whose 18-year-old daughter, Meadow, died in the shooting, commended the FBI for accepting responsibility for its inaction, comparing it to the Broward County school district and sheriff’s office, the school security staff and the psychologists who treated the shooter. He believes they all failed to stop the shooter and have ducked responsibility. “The FBI has made changes to make sure this never happens again,” Pollack said.

Georgia

Atlanta: The state’s public university system won’t rename any of the 75 buildings or colleges an internal committee had recommended for changes mostly because of their association with slavery, segregation or mistreatment of American Indians, officials voted Monday. The system’s regents voted not to make any name changes, more than a year after they established a committee to study that issue. “History can teach us important lessons, lessons that if understood and applied make Georgia and its people stronger,” the regents said in a statement unanimously adopted by the board at a specially called meeting. The regents added that while the board would not pursue name changes involving the buildings and colleges as recommended by the advisory group’s report, it acknowledged there were many viewpoints on the matter. “Going forward, the board is committed to naming actions that reflect the strength and energy of Georgia’s diversity,” the statement said. Georgia passed a law in 2019 prohibiting state and local agencies from renaming any buildings named after a “historical entity” or removing any historical monument. Several regents released statements after the vote, but none directly explained why they supported making no changes. Many were appointed by Republican Gov. Brian Kemp, who supported the 2019 law.

Hawaii

Honolulu: A male Hawaiian monk seal has died at a Big Island marine mammal hospital after a five-week battle with toxoplasmosis, a parasitic disease spread by cat feces, officials said Monday. Toxoplasmosis is the biggest disease threat facing the Hawaiian monk seal, a critically endangered species numbering just 1,300 animals. The seal that died last week was known as RW22, the Marine Mammal Center said in a news release. The center called on cat owners to keep their feline pets indoors and dispose of litter in the trash to protect the species. Feral cat feces is also a concern. Stray cats have no predators in Hawaii, and their numbers have ballooned. Marketing research commissioned by the Hawaiian Humane Society in 2015 estimated Oahu alone had 300,000 feral cats. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration received a report early last month that RW22 had a fishing line in his mouth off Oahu. An X-ray revealed the seal had swallowed some fishing gear. He also showed signs of partial facial nerve paralysis and a corneal ulcer to his left eye, a suspected symptom of toxoplasmosis. The Coast Guard flew RW22 to the seal hospital in Kailua-Kona, where veterinarians treated the seal in hopes of slowing the rate of infection. He regained some stamina and movement but continued to deteriorate.

Idaho

Boise: The state’s top health official has deactivated crisis guidelines for rationing care at most of the state’s hospitals. Idaho Department of Health and Welfare Director Dave Jeppesen issued the decision Monday after health officials said the number of COVID-19 patients remains high but no longer exceeds health care resources in most areas. Crisis standards remain in effect for northern Idaho. During a news conference, Jeppesen and other health care officials warned of possible future outbreaks. “We are not sharing a ‘mission accomplished’ message,” said James Souza, chief medical officer for St. Luke’s Health System. “We don’t believe this will be our last surge of COVID. We hope it’s the worst one.” Crisis standards of care give legal and ethical guidelines to health care providers when they have too many patients and not enough resources to care for them all. They spell out exactly how health care should be rationed to bankatpeoples com mobile the most lives possible during a disaster. Idaho activated the crisis standards for northern Idaho on Sept. 7 and statewide Sept. 16. Officials didn’t bank routing number vs account number a timeline for when crisis standards might be lifted in the northern Idaho district, which covers five counties and includes Kootenai Health in Coeur d’Alene. Health officials said it will take time to catch up on routine surgeries that have been put off.

Illinois

Chicago: Former President Barack Obama’s foundation said Monday that it has received a $100 million donation from Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, the largest individual contribution it has received to date. The Obama foundation said in a statement that the gift from Bezos is intended “to help expand the scope of programming that reaches emerging leaders” in the United States and around the world. The donation, it said, was also given in honor of John Lewis, the congressman and civil rights icon who died last year. As part of the gift, the foundation said Bezos has asked for the plaza at the Obama Presidential Center, under construction in Chicago’s South Side, to be named after Lewis. Valerie Jarrett, a former senior adviser to Obama who serves as the foundation’s CEO, said in a statement that the foundation was “thrilled” by that idea. Construction on Obama’s legacy project is expected to cost about $830 million and be completed by 2025. In the meantime, the foundation said it’s giving donors the opportunity to “honor and elevate the names of those who have fought for a more just and equitable world” by naming public spaces in the center. “Freedom fighters deserve a special place in the pantheon of heroes, and I can’t think of a more fitting person to honor with this gift than John Lewis, a great American leader and a man of extraordinary decency and courage,” Bezos said in the statement released by the foundation.

Indiana

Cyclist and pedestrian safety advocates gathe for a candlelight vigil Sunday at Lugar Plaza to honor the World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims and issue a call to action for Indianapolis.

Indianapolis: Biking advocates reeling from the deaths of seven people this year in collisions between vehicles and cyclists are calling for the city to do more to try to prevent such crashes. About two dozen cyclists held a moment of silence for seven minutes – one for each crash victim – at a downtown plaza Sunday evening to mark World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims. The candlelight vigil was organized by Bike Indianapolis, a nonprofit group that says seven cyclists, by its count, have received a fatal blow from a vehicle in the capital city since mid-July. “This was too many deaths,” said Sylva Zhang, Bike Indianapolis’ marketing director. In each of the previous six years, the city recorded between one and five fatal crashes with cyclists, according to the Indianapolis Metropolitan Planning Organization’s crash dashboard. Biking advocates want the city to establish a crash response team of city-county employees and independent citizens to examine crash sites involving cyclists and pedestrians and recommend preventive infrastructure and policy improvements. They also want the city to respond to those recommendations with plans and to create a database of crash data and reports immediately after they are submitted.

Iowa

Des Moines: A law that prohibits Medicaid coverage for sex reassignment surgeries for transgender Iowans violates state law and the state constitution, a judge ruled in a decision made public Monday. Judge William Kelly ordered the Iowa Department of Human Services to provide coverage for sex reassignment surgeries when ordered to treat gender dysphoria, a psychological distress that results from an incongruence between one’s sex assigned at birth and one’s gender identity. It amazon kindle for pc begins in childhood, and some people may not experience it until after puberty or much later, according to the American Psychiatric Association. About 12 states exclude the surgeries in Medicaid coverage; 18 specifically include gender-affirming care; and others do not address it. The ruling is a victory for Aiden Vasquez and Mika Covington, two residents represented by the ACLU of Iowa. Kelly said state and federal courts in the past 16 years have found that gender identity discrimination is a form of sex discrimination, which is prohibited under civil rights laws. He also found the law violated the equal protection clause of the state constitution. It is not challenged in the record that surgical treatment for gender dysphoria is a serious medical condition, and the surgery is recommended for Vasquez and Covington by medical professionals as necessary and effective, the judge said.

Kansas

Minneapolis: Dale “Duster” Hoffman didn’t want a sorrowful funeral, so instead he got a parade. KWCH-TV reports residents of the small town of Minneapolis, Kansas, turned out Sunday for a parade honoring Hoffman, who died this month at age 71. Hoffman had said he wanted his friends and family to remember him with a fun and joyful gathering. More than 100 cars took part in driving down Main Street as part of the parade. One relative said it was believed to be one of the largest parades ever in Minneapolis, a town of about 2,000 residents about 180 miles west of Kansas City, Missouri.

Kentucky

Lexington: A judge has ruled against a police union in a lawsuit that sought to stop a ban on no-knock warrants in the city. A Fayette County judge agreed Friday to dismiss a lawsuit filed by the local police union, the Lexington Herald-Leader reports. The Fraternal Order of Police Bluegrass Lodge No. 4 filed suit in July against the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government over the no-knock warrant ban it enacted following months of debate after Breonna Taylor was killed by police in Louisville during a raid at her apartment. The union said in the lawsuit that banning the warrants is unsafe and that the organization has the right to bargain on behalf of Lexington officers over changes that affect officers’ “health and safety.” Circuit Judge Kimberly Bunnell said elected officials had the right to enact public policies without bargaining. The FOP may appeal the decision, local representative said.

Louisiana

Baton Rouge: Nearly 15 months after Hurricane Laura struck, the state is kicking off $11.3 million in housing repair and rebuilding programs for the southwestern city of Lake Charles while it waits for hundreds of millions in promised federal aid to arrive. Gov. John Bel Edwards, a Democrat, and Lake Charles Mayor Nic Hunter, a Republican, announced the plans at a joint press conference Monday. The effort will be financed with federal housing and disaster recovery funds available to the state and city through various programs. The dollars largely will pay for home rehabilitation work for low- to moderate-income homeowners, with grants capped at $50,000 per household. A $1 million share of the money will help landlords rebuild housing if they are willing to rent to low- to moderate-income tenants. “The housing situation in Lake Charles is absolutely dire,” Hunter said. “This is going to help.” The city of Lake Charles will administer the program. Hunter didn’t immediately provide information on how people can apply, saying the city is still working out logistics. Edwards and Hunter acknowledged the money is nowhere near the amount needed to address the gaps in insurance coverage and blight of abandoned houses destroyed by Laura in Lake Charles alone, plus the needs of the southwestern region.

Maine

Portland: The herring fishing industry in the Northeast qualifies for federal assistance because its 2019 season has been declared a disaster. The federal government has the ability to declare a “fishery disaster” when adverse circumstances in a fishery cause economic hardship. A recent banknorth phone number assessment of the herring population found the species population has fallen, and tighter fishing quotas have made herring fishing more difficult. U.S. Secretary of Commerce Gina Raimondo announced the disaster declaration Monday. Members of the herring fishing industry will be eligible for disaster assistance, and some fishery-related businesses might also qualify for federal loans, the commerce department said. The commerce department said the allocation of money will be determined soon. Herring are economically important because they’re widely used as lobster bait, as well as for food. The species is also critical to the health of the ocean because of its role in the food chain. Herring fishermen caught more than 200 million pounds of herring as recently as 2014, but the 2019 catch was less than 25 million. The fishery is based mostly in Maine and Massachusetts.

Maryland

Sharpsburg: The vice mayor is facing federal firearms charges, authorities said. An indictment unsealed last week charges Jacob Martz, 41, with possession of a firearm by a prohibited person and possession of a machine gun in connection with 16 firearms and multiple machine-gun conversion devices found at his home, according to a U.S. Attorney’s Office news release. The indictment alleges Martz knew he was prohibited from possessing firearms due to previous felony firearms convictions, but he had 16 guns and about 5,200 rounds of ammunition on Oct. 6. It also alleges he possessed devices used to convert AR-15-style rifles into machine guns, officials said. Martz, vice mayor of Sharpsburg, a small western Maryland town, turned himself in Thursday and pleaded not guilty at an arraignment in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, defense attorney David W. Fischer said. “We intend to vigorously defend against these allegations,” Fischer said. U.S. Attorney’s Office spokeswoman Marcia Murphy said information about the investigation and what led to the charges wouldn’t be made public. Martz was released to his residence, she said. Martz faces a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison on each charge, although sentences are typically less than the maximum, officials said.

Massachusetts

Boston: Mayor Michelle Wu signed an ordinance Monday designed to divest the city from fossil fuels. The ordinance will prohibit the use of public funds from being invested in the stocks, securities or other obligations of any company that derives more than 15% of its revenue from fossil fuels. The ordinance also extends to companies deriving more than 15% of revenue from tobacco products or private prison industries. Wu, a former city councilor sworn in as mayor last week, said the move is the culmination of a years­long push to distance Boston from the fossil fuels that are helping drive the climate change that is threatening the coastal city. “This is deeply boone county indiana republican party for many of us and urgent,” Wu said during a signing ceremony at Boston City Hall. “My older son, Blaise, was born in the first year that I served in this building and the first year that we started to hear it was the hottest year ever on record. Since then, his six years alive on this planet have each been our hottest on record. . We’re moving quickly to make sure that Boston will set the tone for what is possible for that brightest greenest future for all of our kids.” The ordinance will pull $65 million immediately out of the fossil fuel industry, said Boston City Councilor Lydia Edwards, a supporter of the ordinance, unanimously approved by the City Council last week.

Michigan

Flint: At least one person died, and a 3-year-old child remained missing Tuesday, after an overnight explosion and fire destroyed three homes, damaged several others and sent debris falling onto a neighborhood, authorities said. Flint Fire Chief Raymond Barton said Tuesday that two people were rushed from the scene Monday night to area hospitals, where one of them – a 70-year-old man – was pronounced dead. The father of bbva compass locations in florida missing child was in critical condition, Barton said. Another person reported minor injuries following the explosion, which destroyed three homes in the neighborhood on Flint’s west side, WJRT-TV reports. Barton said a Michigan State Police cadaver dog and fire crews with specialized equipment were searching for the 3-year-old. “This is a tragic time for our community,” Mayor Sheldon Neeley said during a Tuesday morning news conference. Three houses were fully engulfed in flames when firefighters arrived at the scene after 9:30 p.m. Monday. Officials said about 20 houses sustained damage, including broken windows from debris thrown across an entire block by the explosion, which was felt miles away. The cause of the explosion, which left the neighborhood littered with splintered wood and other debris, was under investigation, Neeley said.

Minnesota

Moorhead: The USDA Office of Tribal Relations announced this week that it will partner with several Native American-led organizations on projects to raise awareness of Indigenous perspectives about food and agriculture. “The United States government hasn’t always incorporated Indigenous views and values into our work. And that’s particularly true within the food and agricultural space,” said Heather Dawn Thompson, director of the Office of Tribal Relations and a member of the Cheyenne River Sioux tribe. “We’re taking this moment to rethink how the United States Department of Agriculture interacts with and thinks boone county indiana republican party Indigenous foods and Indigenous farming and ranching techniques.” Two regional seed processing centers will be created through the Minnesota-based Native American Food Sovereignty Alliance, Minnesota Public Radio News reports. USDA will help fund equipment for the facilities, one in Minnesota and one in the southwestern U.S. “Some of this equipment is quite pricey and difficult for the average producer or seed saver to acquire on their own,” Thompson said. “So these will become regional hubs that will be available to Native producers to share and use in a cooperative fashion, in order to process their seeds and save them.” Minneapolis-based North American Traditional Indigenous Food Systems will develop recipes using traditional Indigenous foods and foods provided to tribal communities through the federal Emergency Food Assistance Program, said co-founder and executive director Dana Thompson.

Mississippi

Tupelo: A post office now bears the name of an Air Force colonel who was held as a prisoner of war in Vietnam for nearly a decade. During his captivity, Carlyle “Smitty” Harris wrote a letter to his wife, Louise, that ended up at the same post office, the Daily Journal reports. It was renamed for him at a ceremony Friday. “This post office has been in our lives for about 57 years,” Harris said. He still had the letter he sent his wife and pulled it from his coat pocket as he spoke. The letter was delivered to the post office in 1965. Harris was shot down over North Vietnam on April 4 of that year and spent the next eight years as a prisoner of war. A bill to rename the post office was introduced in Congress by U.S. Rep. Trent Kelly and signed into law by President Joe Biden in August.

Missouri

St. Louis: A former police officer convicted of beating a Black undercover detective during a 2017 racial injustice protest has been sentenced to one year and one day in prison – far more lenient than prosecutors and the victim had sought. Dustin Boone was sentenced Monday in U.S. District Court after being convicted in June of a federal civil rights violation related to the attack on Luther Hall. Boone, 37, was one of five white officers charged in the beating. Boone’s sentence was less even than his own lawyers requested. While prosecutors sought a 10-year sentence, defense lawyers asked U.S. District Judge E. Richard Webber to sentence Boone to 26 months. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports the sentence appeared to stun Hall, his relatives and his supporters, who walked out of the courtroom before Webber finished pronouncing the sentence. They declined comment after the hearing, as did prosecutors. Hall, in a statement to Webber before the sentence was announced, said he thought Webber’s sentencing of two other officers charged in the case was too lenient, “leniency that’s not shown to African American defendants.” Boone’s attorneys had argued that he did not participate in the initial Sept. 17, 2017, beating and held Hall down only because other officers were “acting as though” they were making an arrest.

Montana

Helena: An investigation into a complaint that public officials tried to intimidate hospital employees into treating a COVID-19 patient with unapproved medications uncovered a voicemail left by a former state senator in which she said she didn’t think “senators would be too happy to hear about” the hospital’s care of the patient. Jennifer Fielder, now a member of the Public Service Commission, told the Legislature’s special counsel she left the voicemail with St. Peter’s Health on Oct. 11 as a personal matter on behalf of the patient, whom she described as a friend. Senate Minority Leader Jill Cohenour argued Tuesday that if Fielder were leaving a personal message, she wouldn’t have identified herself as a senator in the call. Attorney General Austin Knudsen has acknowledged he intervened in the case and later said Chief Deputy Attorney General Kristen Hansen brought the issue to him, but he denied intimidating anyone. In Fielder’s voicemail, she identified herself as a state senator, and later a former state senator, and said the patient was a Senate staffer. The patient previously served as a temporary state Senate staffer and was not working for the Legislature at the time of her hospitalization, according to the special counsel Abra Belke’s report, released Monday night. The patient, who was admitted to the hospital Oct. 9, died Oct. 26. She was 82.

Nebraska

Lincoln: Gov. Pete Ricketts railed Monday against the chancellor of the University of Nebraska’s flagship campus, saying he was misled about a plan designed to address racial disparities on campus, even as the university system’s president tried to deescalate the situation. Ricketts said he has “lost all faith” in University of Nebraska-Lincoln Chancellor Ronnie Green, who has endorsed the plan as a way to make the campus more diverse and inclusive. Ricketts said Green told him the plan was an effort to increase the number of minority faculty, staff and students on campus, which Ricketts said was “a good thing.” But he said Green didn’t tell him about other parts of the initiative, including a “call to action” statement that says structural racism in society is the cause of disparities between races and isn’t limited to individual beliefs or actions. The statement says the plan is intended to transform the university into a place where every person matters and gets “equitable outcomes.” The Republican governor has blasted the idea as “ideological indoctrination” that will encourage people to see each other through the lens of race instead of as individuals with unique strengths. Just hours before Ricketts spoke, University of Nebraska President Ted Carter released an open letter in support of the plan. “These are uncomfortable conversations, with passionate opinions on many sides,” he said. “Not every Nebraskan, not every member of the university community, will agree with every element of the plan.”

Nevada

Las Vegas: Two Las Vegas-area elected officials are using the same word, “scary,” to describe weekend demonstrations outside their homes involving people expressing opposition to government COVID-19 vaccine and mask mandates. “The scary thing – it was dark, and I couldn’t really see what was going on out there,” Clark County Commissioner Tick Segerblom told the Las Vegas Review-Journal. Segerblom, a Democrat, said Monday that about 20 protesters stayed about two hours outside his home Sunday, holding flags, honking and speaking into bullhorns. He said one repeated chant was: “No mask, no vax.” Outside Clark County School District Board President Linda Cavazos’ home in Henderson, as many as 40 demonstrators showed up about 4:30 p.m. and stayed for about two hours, Clark County School District Police Lt. Bryan Zink said. In photos provided by Cavazos, people can be seen carrying American flags, a yellow “Don’t tread on me” flag and a banner reading, “Let’s go, Brandon” – a term that has become code for a vulgar insult against President Joe Biden. Another man is draped in what appears to be a Confederate flag. Cavazos described the demonstration as “just scary.” “It’s more like bullying,” Cavazos said. “It’s more like intimidation. It’s just not OK.”

New Hampshire

Concord: The state is getting more than $8.3 million to support marketing, workforce and other projects to boost business and travel. The funding was allocated through the American Rescue Plan. The state’s congressional delegation announced the funds last week. “Travel and tourism are core industries that fuel local economies across New Hampshire – these sectors are key to our state’s recovery following the pandemic,” U.S. Sen. Jeanne Shaheen said in a statement. The grant comes from the Commerce Department’s Economic Development Administration, which makes investments in economically distressed communities in order to create jobs, promote innovation and accelerate long-term sustainable economic growth.

New Jersey

Newark: The state has moved closer to withdrawing from a bi-state commission formed to monitor corruption at the New York region’s ports. The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to hear a lawsuit filed by the Waterfront Commission of New York Harbor that had sought to block New Jersey’s move. If the state of New York doesn’t step in to file a legal challenge, the commission would effectively be dissolved. The commission was formed in the 1950s to combat entrenched organized crime influences at the ports. But in recent years, New Jersey has contended that organized crime has largely been driven out of the ports and that the commission was impeding job growth by over-regulating businesses there and making hiring more difficult. Under New Jersey’s plan, state police would take over investigating criminal activity at the ports. The New York-New Jersey port system, among the busiest in the country, includes container terminals in Newark, Elizabeth and Bayonne in New Jersey, as well as Staten Island and Brooklyn in New York. The New Jersey terminals handle the bulk of the port’s business. “The Governor is pleased with the Supreme Court’s decision to reject the Waterfront Commission’s appeal,” Michael Zhadanovsky, a spokesperson for Gov. Phil Murphy, said in an email Tuesday.

New Mexico

Albuquerque: Major repairs to a northern New Mexico dam will mean irrigation water will have to be stored elsewhere. Repairs on El Vado Dam are slated to start next spring, leaving it unusable for at least a year to deliver water to the Middle Rio Grande Valley, said Page Pegram of the New Mexico Interstate Stream Commission. Abiquiu Lake most likely will be the backup, Pegram told the Albuquerque Journal. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation plans to address cracks in El Vado’s steel faceplate and the foundation, as well as the deteriorating spillway. The dam was built in the 1930s, and its current condition isn’t safe for the public, the agency said. El Vado Dam can hold back about 60 billion gallons of water, but the capacity will be reduced significantly while the repairs are being done. Persistent drought also has meant less water in New Mexico reservoirs, and the region could be in store for a dry winter with a La Niña weather pattern. “Water supply conditions for the Middle Rio Grande in 2022 are expected to be significantly diminished,” Pegram said. “We expect stream flows in the basin to remain below average.”

New York

Albany: The state is facing calls from faculty to boost its public university system by launching a university endowment – a step dozens of other states have taken. Lawmakers on the state Senate higher education committee held a hearing Monday as part of the ongoing budget process. New York’s economy is still rebounding from the COVID-19 pandemic, but the state is facing demands for increased spending at a time when tax collections are strong. The state’s general fund as of September was $4.5 billion higher than the previous September. It’s time for New York to allocate $150 million in additional aid to state-operated campuses, said Frederick Kowal, president of the United University Professions union, which represents more than 37,000 academic and professional faculty. Kowal told lawmakers that New York flat-funded higher education and increased the state’s reliance on students’ tuition and fees under former Gov. Andrew Cuomo. “The abandonment of our public higher education system has directly led to drops in enrollment,” Kowal said. And he said an endowment would provide a long-term funding resource to rebuild “depleted” academic departments and hire and promote a more diverse workforce.

North Carolina

Raleigh: Gov. Roy Cooper approved a measure Tuesday for a new governing structure for high school sports. The new law allows the State Board of Education to create a formal agreement with the North Carolina High School Athletic Association, the nonprofit body currently capital one online savings interest rate high school athletics. Under the compromise legislation, the State Board of Education can now reach a memorandum of understanding with the group to administer and enforce the education board’s requirements for high school sports. The deal needs to be reached by March 15 and last an initial four years. “For months, we worked tirelessly to determine the best governing structure that supports our student-athletes and is transparent and accountable,” said a statement from state Sen. Vickie Sawyer, an Iredell County Republican who helped craft the bipartisan bill. “After productive conversations with the NCHSAA, State Board of Education, Governor’s Office, and our Democratic colleagues, we’ve established a clear path forward. I want to thank Gov. Cooper for signing this bill into law.” While state education officials must adopt student participation rules, they can delegate rules on items like school penalties and participation fees to the association, which currently represents more than 400 schools.

North Dakota

Bismarck: The state Game and Fish Department on Monday unveiled a plan to bring landowners, conservation groups, scientists and others together to restore native grasslands. The agency said North Dakota has lost more than 70% of its native prairie, which is essential for wildlife, pollinators, ranching operations and communities. About 60% of the nearly 5 million wetland acres in the state have been converted or lost. “When we talk about native prairie in the state, we need to acknowledge who the owners and managers of our native prairie are,” said Greg Link, the department’s conservation and communications division chief. “In most cases, we’re talking about ranchers and producers who run livestock on that prairie.” The so-called Meadowlark Initiative is named after the official state bird, known for its unique song. The western meadowlark populations in North Dakota are continuing to decline, wildlife officials said. The program allows producers to plant marginal cropland back to diverse native perennial grasslands for grazing. Funding is available to establish the grass and install grazing infrastructure, such as fencing and water. Producers also are eligible to receive rental payments for the first three years as the land transitions from cropland to grazing land.

Ohio

Cleveland: CVS, Walgreens and Walmart pharmacies recklessly distributed massive amounts of pain pills in two Ohio counties, a federal jury said Tuesday in a verdict that could set the tone for city and county governments across the country that want to hold pharmacies accountable for their roles in the opioid crisis. Lake and Trumbull counties blamed the three chain pharmacies for not stopping the flood of pills that caused hundreds of overdose deaths and cost each of the two counties about $1 billion, their attorney said. How much the pharmacies must pay in damages will be decided in the spring by a federal judge. It was the first time pharmacy companies had completed a trial to defend themselves in a drug crisis that has killed a half-million Americans over the past two decades. The counties were able to convince the jury that the pharmacies played an outsized role in creating a public nuisance in the way they dispensed pain medication into their communities. “The law requires pharmacies to be diligent in dealing drugs. This case should be a wake-up call that failure will not be the giving keys inc said Mark Lanier, an attorney for the counties. Spokespeople for CVSHealth and Walgreen Co. said the companies disagree with the verdict and will appeal. Two other chains, Rite Aid and Giant Eagle, already had settled lawsuits with the counties.

Oklahoma

Oklahoma City: Gov. Kevin Stitt on Monday signed into law newly drawn maps for the state’s five congressional and 149 state House and Senate districts. The bills, approved by the Republican-controlled Legislature during a special session last week, contain the new district boundaries that will be in place for the next 10 years. The new maps had to reapportion the state’s population, which has continued shifting from rural communities to urban and suburban areas. Democrats strongly opposed the newly drawn 5th Congressional District, which has been competitive in recent years, with Democrats winning the seat as recently as 2018 before Republicans won it back last year. The new map moves Democratic portions of Oklahoma City’s core and south side into the heavily Republican 3rd Congressional District that stretches across western and northwestern Oklahoma. Andy Moore, executive director of the group People Not Politicians, which tried unsuccessfully to shift the responsibility of drawing the new maps from the Legislature to a bipartisan commission, said the new maps were a clear example of gerrymandering. “We are disappointed that the Legislature adopted a congressional map that was drawn in secret, divides communities and prioritizes politics over what’s best for Oklahoma voters,” he said in a statement.

Oregon

Portland: As COVID-19 cases in the state continue to decrease, health officials announced Tuesday that they are immediately lifting statewide mask requirements in crowded outdoor settings. Oregon was the first state in the U.S. to reimplement an outdoor mask mandate for both vaccinated and unvaccinated residents in August as the delta variant of the coronavirus spread. At the time, Oregon was in the midst of its worst surge during the pandemic. Record daily COVID-19 cases were set day after day, and hospitalizations overwhelmed the health system. A majority of people hospitalized were unvaccinated. However, over the past six weeks, health officials say Oregon’s daily COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations have steadily declined. Last week, cases decreased by 12% from the previous week. “We took decisive measures. And, as has been the case over the course of this pandemic, Oregonians resoundingly responded,” Patrick Allen, director of the Oregon Health Authority, said Tuesday. “Together we have managed to turn back the tsunami of new infections that very nearly swamped our health care system.” Oregon has had some of the strictest statewide coronavirus-related restrictions and safety measures during the pandemic.

Pennsylvania

Philadelphia: Eight civilian Philadelphia Police Department employees were indicted on charges of collecting Pandemic Unemployment Assistance to which they were not entitled because they remained employed. Seven of the employees are dispatchers, and one is a clerk. A federal grand jury returned an indictment charging them with theft of government funds, wire fraud and mail fraud. The accused took advantage of a system that was designed to aid people left unemployed because of the pandemic, prosecutors said. Each allegedly submitted weekly certifications stating that they were not employed and were ready, willing and able to work each day, prosecutors said. According to the indictment, those statements were false because each was employed by the police department. Prosecutors said the employees received assistance funds for multiple weeks while also collecting a salary from the city. Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw on Tuesday said she will suspend them for 30 days with the intent to dismiss them at the end of the 30 days upon completion of arrest procedures.

Rhode Island

Providence: The state has been awarded an $81.7 million federal grant for the state health department to build a new public health laboratory. Rhode Island’s congressional delegation announced the new federal Epidemiology and Laboratory Capacity grant, saying the current facility, commissioned in 1978, has insufficient laboratory space, inadequate building systems and broken equipment, and the state spends more than $500,000 annually to keep it working efficiently. The state health laboratories work to investigate and mitigate life-threatening diseases, including COVID-19, eastern equine encephalitis, Ebola, H1N1 and Zika. Last year, when commercial testing services weren’t yet widely available, the number of coronavirus samples that could be tested was limited due to insufficient laboratory space, the delegation said. “COVID-19 revealed a serious gap in our health care infrastructure. This new federal funding will help Rhode Island bridge that gap and create a new state-of-the-art lab facility for the 21st century,” U.S. Sens. Jack Reed and Sheldon Whitehouse and U.S. Reps. Jim Langevin and David Cicilline said in a joint statement. The state health laboratories also work with state and municipal agencies to ensure the safety of drinking water and food, monitor water and air pollution, and help public safety and criminal investigations through police officer boone county indiana republican party, DNA testing and drug identification.

South Carolina

Columbia: State health and education officials want students to come up with a short song to encourage people to get COVID-19 vaccines. The winning jingle will get the winner’s school $10,000 toward music programs and be recorded and featured in statewide radio advertisements in 2022. Individual students, classes or groups can all compete in the Sing It to Win It campaign. The deadline is Jan. 31, officials said. Five finalists will be chosen and put up for a vote on both the state Department of Education and state Department of Health and Environmental Control’s social media accounts. A $5,000 second place and $3,000 third place prize will also be awarded to a school.

South Dakota

Sioux Falls: Marcella Rose LeBeau, an Army nurse who was honored for her service during World War II geico home insurance usa leadership in the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, has died. She was 102. Family members said she “passed on to journey to the next world” late Sunday in Eagle Butte after experiencing problems with her digestive system and losing her appetite. LeBeau had remained active all of her life and earlier this month traveled to Oklahoma for a ceremony honoring her induction into the National Native American Hall of Fame. Her daughter, Gerri Lebeau, said the matriarch of her family demonstrated fortitude, as well as an ability to seek healing, as she overcame the abuses she faced at an Indian boarding school during her youth. She went on to treat front-line soldiers as an Army nurse in Europe during the Allied invasion of Normandy. After returning home, she became an outspoken advocate for health in the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe. “She was the foundation of our family,” said her grandson Ryman LeBeau. “She had a lifetime of good things that she had accomplished.” Lebeau was born in 1919 and grew up in Promise, South Dakota, as a member of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe. Her mother died when she was 10 years old, and her grandmother gave her the name Wigmunke’ Waste Win’, or Pretty Rainbow Woman. But LeBeau grew up at a time when the government was attempting to eradicate her culture – while her grandmother only spoke the Lakota language, she could be punished for speaking it at the boarding school.

Tennessee

Nashville: A historically Black medical college is giving students an early Thanksgiving gift – $10,000 in cash. Meharry Medical College President James E.K. Hildreth announced the gift Monday, telling students they would receive it Wednesday. The money comes from the Higher Education Emergency Relief Fund, part of a federal coronavirus aid package. Schools across the country have used their money to wipe out student debts, offer free tuition and give cash grants such as the one at Meharry. In a video message to the Nashville school’s 956 students, Hildreth said they can manage their money however they choose, but he strongly urged them to use it for their education and training. Rising senior Benson Joseph said he is still deciding how to use his gift, but he will definitely set a portion aside to help cover travel expenses when he interviews for residency programs next year and other expenses financial aid does not cover. “It feels like Christmas came a little bit early,” said Joseph, who plans to pursue neurosurgery. “The last two years have been quite a trial for a lot of us.” Hildreth said in the video announcement that he is thankful for those who work at Meharry and those who support the college with their resources. “But mostly, I’m thankful for you students and the future of health care that is entrusted to you,” he said.

Texas

Dallas: Students at a suburban high school are planning more demonstrations after four students were arrested last week at a protest against the school’s response to allegations of sexual harassment. Hundreds of students decided to walk out of their classes at Little Elm High School on Friday morning after a sophomore publicly accused a freshman of sexually harassing and abusing her. The sophomore’s friend posted on social media that she had reported the abuse to the school’s administration. The friend alleged the administration then suspended the sophomore for three days for falsely accusing the freshman, according to the post. In a joint statement with Little Elm Mayor Curtis Cornelious, Little Elm Superintendent Daniel Gallagher said the school’s investigation of the alleged abuse did not find sufficient evidence of a crime. He denied allegations the student received disciplinary action for reporting the harassment. Another junior, Kailey Heaton, said things turned violent when police officers attempted to corral the protesting students by linking arms. Heaton said the officers began attempting to push the teens back, but students eventually broke through the line. Videos widely shared on social media show officers forcibly holding a student on the ground while arresting him. Others show two officers pepper-spraying one student and firing their Tasers at him. Cornelious said in a video statement on Facebook that officers were justified in their use of force against the students.

Utah

&quot;The Bluest Eye&quot; by Toni Morrison

Salt Lake City: The American Civil Liberties Union of Utah is investigating complaints related to the removal of several books from high school library shelves after a parent complaint. The Canyons School District appears to have disregarded its own policy for responding to such complaints by pulling nine books off the shelves, including “The Bluest Eye” by Toni Morrison, before completing a full review, the organization said in a statement. The removals came after a parent of younger students in the district emailed about what she called sexually explicit material in several titles that she learned about from social media, KSL.com reports. She told the outlet she had asked for them to be reviewed for content, not necessarily pulled. The Canyons policy states that books should remain in use until a full review of any challenged material is complete. In this case, nine books were removed from shelves in four high schools while a review was still in process. District spokesman Jeff Haney has said the district decided does capital one have personal loans pull the books off the shelves of the school libraries while district officials review the policy itself, which also says that challenges to library materials cannot come from outside a school community. In a statement to KSL.com, he framed the district’s action as a “review for content.”

Vermont

Montpelier: Gov. Phil Scott signed into law Tuesday a bill that will allow the state’s municipalities to adopt temporary indoor mask mandates. Scott’s signature came a day after the Legislature held a special session in which the new law that allows a municipality to impose its own mask was introduced and approved. Scott said he called the special session at the request of the Vermont League of Cities and Towns as a compromise after some lawmakers urged him to reimpose a statewide mask mandate. “As you’ve heard me say repeatedly, masking when inside in public spaces is a good idea right now because masks work, but at this point in the pandemic, mandates won’t,” Scott said. “And I think they’ll be divisive and counterproductive.” Within hours contra costa county library login the new law taking effect, Burlington Mayor Miro Weinberger said he would propose requiring facial coverings in indoor public settings except for situations in which all employees and customers in city businesses are verified to be vaccinated against COVID-19. The ordinance will go before the Burlington City Council on Dec. 1.

Virginia

Richmond: A hospital has seen a surge in cases of a coronavirus-related complication in children, officials said. The Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU said 15 kids were hospitalized at the same time last month with a rare inflammatory condition in children linked with the virus, WRIC-TV reports. It was the hospital’s highest peak since the pandemic started, officials said. Previously, it had two or three children hospitalized with the condition at a time. Dr. Tiffany Kimbrough, director of the hospital’s Mother-Infant Unit, said the hospital has seen 50 cases since the pandemic began. The condition can occur two to six weeks after a child recovers from a mild or asymptomatic battle with COVID-19. Kids get symptoms like fever, trouble breathing, abdominal pain and vomiting “and can progress to full shock very quickly,” Kimbrough said. No children with the condition have died on the hospital’s watch, she said. Among the cases the facility has seen, a majority of the children affected are kids of color, she said. Despite the “concerning” numbers last month, Kimbrough said health workers are hopeful that as more children get vaccinated against COVID-19, they will see fewer infections in that age group.

Washington

Seattle: The City Council has approved a 2022 budget that cuts police department spending from previous years, drawing criticism from people who say city voters earlier this month endorsed more spending on public safety. In an 8-1 vote Monday, the council approved a $355.5 million budget for the department, saying there are no cuts functionally for the Seattle Police Department. KOMO reports the budget includes funds to hire 125 officers in 2022. But the police department’s budget is smaller compared to years past. In 2021 the budget was $363 million, and in 2020 it was $401.8 million. Outgoing Mayor Jenny Durkan criticized the new spending plan. “Every time council acts, they’re telling officers that are here today if they’re valued or not,” Durkan said. “Mayor-elect Harrell ran on adding more officers, and I’m trying to set him up for success as much as Boone county indiana republican party can.” Bruce Harrell easily won the race for Seattle mayor, running on a platform of increased spending on police services and criticizing opponents who advocated “defunding” the police. The new budget includes funds for 1,357 officers, and SPD reports currently having 1,120 officers on the force, which leaves 237 open jobs.

West Virginia

Snowshoe: A ski resort is opening some of its trails to the public on Thanksgiving. Snowshoe Mountain said it will start the ski season for the general public Thursday with a limited number of trails. The resort also will be open Wednesday to passholders and anyone who already purchased lift tickets for that day. The Pocahontas County facility will have 30 acres of available terrain to skiers and snowboarders with three lifts operating, the West Virginia Ski Areas Association said in a news release. Ski operations at Timberline resort could start as early as the weekend, while Canaan Valley and Winterplace resorts are scheduled to begin in the middle of next month, the statement said. Visitors are asked to check with individual resorts for COVID-19 safety requirements. The association again this year is offering a program that will let children in fourth and fifth grades ski or snowboard for free. Under the program, up to three junior lift tickets and one rental will be allowed at participating resorts during the 2021-22 season, the statement said. West Virginia resorts draw more than 800,000 skier visits a year, typically luring visitors from Virginia, North Carolina, Ohio and Florida. The ski and snowboard season traditionally runs through late March, weather permitting.

Wisconsin

Madison: Cities are looking for ways to care for an increased what banks can you open a checking account online of people experiencing homelessness this winter. Joe Volk, executive director of the Wisconsin Coalition Against Homelessness, said communities across the state have been allocating money to increase services for unsheltered people. He said much of the funding has come from federal pandemic recovery aid, often being used to provide hotel rooms and other temporary housing. Volk said there are more people experiencing homelessness this fall than prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, including families with children, Wisconsin Public Radio reports. “We’ve been through an unimaginable year and a half of social and economic disruption,” Volk said. “Certainly things would probably be a lot worse if the federal government hadn’t stepped in.” But he said that “a certain number of those folks are going to fall through the cracks and become homeless.” The La Crosse City Council has voted to allocate $700,000 to fund a temporary winter shelter from November to March. In Madison, city officials have been working to relocate people living in tents at a local park to a new city-owned encampment. The site has 30 prefabricated shelters with heating and electricity, as well as bathroom facilities and on-site support staff from local nonprofits.

Wyoming

Laramie: A student team at the University of Wyoming has been awarded $100,000 for its work on technology to track carbon in soil as part of efforts to help capture and store greenhouse gases, the Casper Star-Tribune reports.

From USA TODAY Network and wire reports

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Indigenous food, boycott anniversary: News from nwcu edu email our 50 states

Источник: https://finance.yahoo.com/news/indigenous-food-boycott-anniversary-herring-201547757.html

8 from GOP, 1 from Dems, unopposed in county for primary races

Eight Republican officeholders are unopposed in their primary bids, as is the lone Democrat seeking a county office.

On the township level, nine Republican township trustees face no primary opposition as they seek to retain their offices. The lone Democrat seeking to become a township trustee is also unopposed. In three townships, there are no candidates of either party seeking the trustee's office.

COUNTY OFFICES
Democrat Roxanna Murray, of Roanoke, is seeking her party's nomination for the first district seat on Huntington County Council. She did not respond to The TAB's request for information.

Republicans who are unopposed as they seek nominations for county offices are:

• Amy C. Richison, Huntington County prosecuting attorney. Richison, 42, was first elected prosecutor in 2006 and is completing her second term in the office.
Richison earned a Bachelor of Arts in psychology from Indiana University in 1993 and a Doctor of Jurisprudence from the Indiana University School of Law, Boomington, in 1996. She is a board member for the Association of Indiana Prosecuting Attorneys, serves on the community support team for Huntington County Youth for Christ and attends The Chapel.

• Kittie Keiffer, Huntington County clerk of courts. Keiffer, 61, is completing her first term as county clerk and previously served as a member of the Lancaster Township Advisory Board.

Keiffer graduated from Huntington North High School in 1970 and from the Bill Miller School of Real Estate in 1989. She is a member of the Association of Clerks of Circuit Courts, Association of Indiana Counties, National Association of Realtors and Upstar.

• Cheryl A. Schenkel, county recorder. Schenkel, 53, is completing her first term as county recorder.
She is a graduate of Huntington High School.

• Terry Stoffel, sheriff. Stoffel, 52, is completing his first term as sheriff. A former member of the Huntington Police Department, he served as city police chief for eight years.

Stoffel graduated from Huntington North High School and completed Indiana Law Enforcement Academy training in 1992. He has completed additional training in D.A.R.E. instruction, lie detection, advanced weapons, autism awareness, elder abuse and active shooter and school safety. He is a member of SS. Peter and Paul Catholic Church and served as F.O.P. president for two terms.

• Terri Boone, Huntington County Assessor. She did not respond to The TAB's request for information.

• Todd M. Landrum, Huntington County Council first district representative. Landrum did not respond to The TAB's request for information.

The county council's first district includes Union and Jackson Townships, as well as Huntington Township precincts 1, 1A, 10, 11A, 12A and 13. Landrum will be on the ballot only in that district.

• Kendall Mickley, Huntington County Council second district representative. Mickley, 44, was first elected to county council in 2010 and is currently serving as its president.

Mickley is employed as division controller for Gerdau in Huntington. A 1987 graduate of Huntington North High School, he holds a Bachelor of Science in business, with an accounting concentration, from the Kelley School of Business at Indiana University. He is a member of the Huntington Optimist Club and Indiana University Alumni Association and serves on the board of directors for the Parkview Huntington Family YMCA.

The county council's second district includes Clear Creek and Warren townships as well as Huntington Township precincts 7, 7A, 8, 9, 11 and 12. Mickley will be on the ballot only in that district.

• Don Davenriner, Huntington County Council fourth district representative. Davenriner, 80, is in his 12th year as a county council member.

Davenriner is a self-employed farmer and attends the Huntington Church of the Nazarene.

The county council's fourth district includes Dallas, Rock Creek, Lancaster, Salamonie, Jefferson, Wayne and Polk townships. Davenriner will be on the ballot only in those townships.
------

TOWNSHIP OFFICES
Kevin Murray, a Roanoke resident seeking the Democrat nomination as Jackson Township trustee, is one of two Democrats seeking township offices in the primary.

The second is Cathy Johnson, a candidate for the Dallas Township Advisory Board.

All nine incumbent trustees seeking re-election are on the Republican primary ballot. They are:

• Huntington Township trustee: Tim Guy, 62, who is in his third term as Huntington Township trustee. He also works as a school bus driver for the Huntington County Community School Corporation.

Guy is a member of and Sunday school teacher at the Huntington Church of the Nazarene. He serves as treasurer of the Historic Forks of the Wabash board of directors and served one term as vice chairman of the Huntington County Republican party.

• Jackson Township trustee: Sheila Hines, the current trustee and a former member of the township advisory board.

Hines has attended training sessions on township assistance and cemetery restoration. She is a member of the Indiana Township Association and Post 160 Legion Auxiliary, and attends Union Church.

• Clear Creek Township trustee: Jay R. Hammel, the incumbent. Hammel did not respond to The TAB's request for information.

• Dallas Township trustee: Brenda Kitt, the incumbent. Kitt did not respond to The TAB's request for information.

• Warren Township trustee: Kathy E. Morton, 67, who is completing her first term in that office. She also works part time at Town & Country Flowers and Gifts.

Morton is a 1965 graduate of Clear Creek High School and attended Manchester College. She is a member of Lions International-Bippus Lions Club and Clear Creek Community Church.

• Rock Creek Township trustee: Linda Mautz, 66, who has served as Rock Creek Township trustee since January of 2011.

Mautz graduated from Warren High School in 1965 and earned an Associate of Arts in business administration, Bachelor of Arts in psychology and Master of Science in education, all from the University of Saint Francis. She also completed school counseling internships and post-graduate studies in mental health counseling. She retired her practice in mental health counseling after working in that area for 14 years. She is a director of Creekview Farms, Inc., and assists with business aspects of the operation. She has volunteered with several area organizations.

• Union Township trustee: David I. Hornback. Hornback did not respond to The TAB's request for information.

• Lancaster Township trustee: Thomas J. Allred. Allred did not respond to The TAB's request for information.

• Polk Township trustee: Gary Miller. Miller did not respond to The TAB's request for information.

Republican candidates for the three-member township advisory boards are:

• Huntington Township - John L. Baker, Terry L. Miller and Andy Zay.

• Jackson Township - Wayne Fox, Larry G. Lahr and Steve Thomas.

• Clear Creek township - Eldon L. Bruner, Richard W. Michel and Roger L. Warner.

• Dallas Township - Forrest "Dale" Gray Jr. and Karen Rice.

• Warren Township - Jack Sell.

• Rock Creek Township - Jerry A. Mossburg and Robert "Rob" Raab.

• Union Township - Harold W. Kline and Neil R. Kline.

• Lancaster Township - Linda S. Couch, Richard D. Keiffer and Terry Updike.

• Polk Township - Joe Eisenhauer and Angie Tyner.

Источник: http://www.huntingtoncountytab.com/community/27422/8-gop-1-dems-unopposed-county-primary-races
Digits=6" alt="Hit Counter">(Note: This Hit Counter was effective October 25, 2013.)

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Watchdog Indiana LogoWatchdog Lebanon provides information about the revenues, spending, and long-term debt assumption of the local and county governments in Boone County. An online community is established where Boone County Hoosiers work together to help control government growth. This volunteer effort is non-party, non-connected, and non-profit. 

Watchdog Lebanon is an advocate for good government that focuses on the local tax burden of Boone County working families.

"The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena. . who at the best, knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat." - Theodore Roosevelt

Watchdog Lebanon was founded by Aaron Smith on November 14, 2001. Aaron's resides in Lebanon Indiana, and his biographical information can be found online at http://www.finplaneducation.net/aaron.htm. 

Subscribe!
 Subscribe to receive Watchdog Lebanon E-mail notifications whenever something comes up that is likely to affect local government taxes and spending in Boone County. Put WHAT'S NEW in the subject line of your E-mail sent to [email protected] 

Immediate action needed!
06/17/2019:
The City of Lebanon chose to accept the maximum permissible Payment In Lieu Of Taxes (PILOT) payments allowed by state law from our Lebanon Utilities every year beginning in 2011 when the City�s Resolution No. 2010-07 was adopted on December 13, 2010.

The following spreadsheet details how the maximum permissible 2011-2018 PILOT payments from our Lebanon Utilities to the City�s General Fund have totaled $3,564,988:

Lebanon Utilities PILOT History 2011-2018

PILOT = Payments In Lieu Of Taxes from Lebanon Utilities to the City of Lebanon General Fund

(Compiled June 13, 2019)

SOURCES:

(1) March 4, 2019, E-mail from the Lebanon Utilities Chief Financial Officer.

(2) May 17, 2019, E-mail from the Lebanon Utilities Chief Financial Officer.

Year

Electric

Water

Wastewater

Telecommunications

Total

2018 Actual

$164,823

$146,038

$206,142

$2,589

$519,592

2017 Actual

$164,899

$132,985

$208,877

$2,508

$509,269

2016 Actual

$139,574

$130,558

$207,619

$2,617

$480,368

2015 Actual

$136,728

$134,296

$214,070

$2,327

$487,421

2014 Actual

$109,175

$124,203

$207,814

$1,948

$443,140

2013 Actual

$96,950

$125,171

$208,240

$1,494

$431,855

2012 Actual

$80,880

$105,313

$185,181

$1,957

$373,331

2011 Actual

$64,021

$88,638

$165,397

$1,956

$320,012

TOTALS

$957,050

$987,202

$1,603,340

$17,396

$3,564,988

Electric

Water

Wastewater

Telecommunications

Grand Total

The current PILOT payments just add to the City�s General Fund cash balance because the City does not dedicate any of these payments to meet the City�s ongoing needs.

According to the Annual Financial Report data from the Indiana Gateway website, the City�s General Fund cash balance from 12/31/2010 to 12/31/2018 increased $3,960,760 (or 258 percent from $1,537,885 to $5,498,645). It is informative to note that the City�s 2011-2018 General Fund cash balance increased $395,772 WITHOUT the PILOT payments. Also, the 2011-2018 cash balance increases in the City�s other governmental activities funds totaled $10,021,602. It is clear that Lebanon City Council Members, Lebanon Mayors, and the Lebanon Clerk-Treasurer have so successfully managed the City�s finances that supplemental PILOT payments from our Lebanon Utilities are not currently needed.

Resolution 2019-02 was passed unanimously by your Lebanon Utilities Service Board (LUSB) on June 5 and recommends that the City revise its Resolution 2010-07 as follows:
    In accordance with Indiana Code � 8-1. 5-3-8(g), the Common Council of the City of Lebanon ("City") hereby elects to transfer to the City's General Fund, a payment in lieu of taxes from the rates and charges of Lebanon Utilities in an amount up to the taxes that would be due the City on the property owned by Lebanon Utilities as if the property were privately owned. The amount of PILOT collected from the Utility will be reviewed and determined by the City on an annual basis, after presentation from the Utility during the City's budget work sessions which shall include projected capital improvement projects to the Utility infrastructure.

This recommended revision to the City�s Resolution 2010-07 would change the City�s decision-making process regarding Lebanon Utilities PILOT payments as listed next.

1. Our Lebanon City Council, with the approval of our Lebanon Mayor, would have the option to decide each year whether the City needs to have any PILOT payments transferred to the City�s General Fund from our Lebanon Utilities. The City could accept on a yearly basis either (a) the maximum permissible PILOT payments, (b) no PILOT payments whatsoever, or (c) any amount less than the maximum permissible PILOT payments. Currently the City is required to accept the maximum permissible PILOT payments allowed by state law from our Lebanon Utilities every year.

2. Lebanon Utilities would present its planned utility infrastructure capital improvements to our City Council, Mayor, and Clerk-Treasurer during the City�s budget work sessions each year.

3. Our City Council, with the approval of our Mayor, would decide each year boone county indiana republican party or not to accept any PILOT payments from out Lebanon Utilities.

4. The PILOT payments not accepted by the City would be deposited in PILOT Reserve Funds established by our Lebanon Utilities.

5. The Lebanon Utilities PILOT Reserve Funds would all be spent on the planned utility infrastructure capital improvements so that the balance in each Reserve Fund would be zero by the end of the year.

If the City were to change its Resolution No. 2010-07 so that the PILOT payments made by our Lebanon Utilities to the City could be reduced or eliminated, then the PILOT amounts retained by our Lebanon Utilities would be spent on the capital project needs of our wastewater, electric, water, and telecommunications departments � while avoiding utility rate increases that would unnecessarily harm too many of our vulnerable neighbors.

The current $558,368 inPILOT payments from our Lebanon Utilities are not now needed to subsidize our City government because the able management of our elected officials, together with recent increases in existing taxes and the imposition of new taxes, have provided ample revenues to meet our City�s needs.

Our Mayor Matt Gentry ([email protected], 765-482-1201) has agreed that the City�s Resolution 2010-07 should be changed as recommended! You may want to contact Mayor Gentry and thank him for his ratepayer (and taxpayer) friendly decision � and contact our City Council members to express your opinion about changing the City�s Resolution 2010-07: Keith Campbell ([email protected]), John Copeland ([email protected]), Dan Fleming ([email protected]), Morris Jones ([email protected]), Mike Kincaid ([email protected] ), Dick Robertson ([email protected]), Brent Wheat ([email protected]).

Did You Know?
06/18/2020:
Two deadly force categories of neck restraints are recognized for use by law enforcement agencies: (a) the chokehold that restricts a suspect's ability to breathe by applying pressure to the suspect's windpipe and (b) the vascular neck restraint that temporarily cuts off blood flow to the brain causing a suspect to go unconscious for a short period (when properly applied to a healthy suspect). Relevant information about the use of neck restraints by the Lebanon Police Department can be found online at http://finplaneducation.net/LPD_Neck_Area.htm. Also, relevant information about the use of neck restraints by the Boone County Sheriff's Office can be found online at http://finplaneducation.net/BCSO_Neck_Area.htm.

  Lebanon Sanitary Sewer Backup Prevention

Raw sewage backups in Lebanon homes present serious health hazards from exposure to the pathogens and allergens that fester in sewage waste. The Indiana State Department of Health has identified the following diseases caused by raw sewage and sewage contaminated water: Campylobacteriosis, Cryptosporidiosis, Escherichia coli Diarrhea, Encephalitis, Gastroenteritis, Giardiasis, Hepatitis A, Leptospirosis, Methaemoglobinaemia, Poliomyelitis, Salmonellosis, Shigellosis, Paratyphoid Fever, Typhoid Fever, and Yersiniosis. Details regarding these dangerous diseases can be found online at http://www.in.gov/isdh/22963.htm.

The elimination of improper sump pump and other connections to the sanitary sewer system is an important first step in preventing Lebanon�s sanitary sewer backups. A Special Report has been prepared by Watchdog Lebanon regarding the prevention of sanitary sewer backups in Lebanon homes. The Special Report sections include (1) Introduction, (2) Lebanon Sanitary System Overview, (3) Lebanon Sanitary Sewer Backup Sources, (4) Lebanon Sanitary Sewer Backup Solutions, (5) Proper Storm Water Management For Morningside & Edgewood Homeowners, (6) Voluntary Compliance Is Important, (7) Home Sump Pumps A Likely Problem, (8) Disconnecting Home Sump Pumps Will Prevent Most Sanitary Sewer Backups, (9) Payment Options To Correct Improper Sanitary Sewer Connections. The Special Report can be found online at http://www.finplaneducation.net/sewer_backup_prevention.htm.

The raw sewage backups into some Lebanon homes during significant rain events must be eliminated because they create serious health hazards.

 

Lebanon Topics Index

Boone County Free Public Records Directory
Consumer Price Index
Family Meals Tax: Lebanon Food and Beverage Tax.
Free Speech Guarantees
Get-Ahead Wage
Greater Lebanon Community Vision Committee
Huck Lewis Campaign Contributions: 2010-2015 Summary and 2014 Receipts & Expenditures and 2015 Receipts & Expenditures
Huck Lewis Election Law Violations Complaint
Indiana Statewide COVID-19 Statistics
Lebanon Backyard Chickens
Lebanon Business Park: 2014 Property Taxes and 2014 School Taxes and Tax Increment Financing Area Impact.
Lebanon Candidate Information:
   2015 Lebanon Mayor Candidates: Matt Gentry, Harold "Huck" Lewis
   2015 Lebanon City Council Candidates: Keith A. Campbell, John Copeland, Dan Fleming, Larry A. Hysong, Mike Kincaid, Lana M. Kruse, Corey Kutz, Jeremy Lamar, Steve Large, Preston Myers, Kevin Van Horn
   2014 Lebanon Community School Corporation Board of Trustees Candidates: Allen D. Douglass, Elizabeth Padgett (Liz) Keith, Tom Merritt
   2011 Lebanon Candidates (Lebanon Clerk Treasurer)
   2007 Lebanon Candidates (November 6, 2007, Lebanon Mayor General Election)
   2003-2005 Lebanon City Council Voting Record
   2002-03 Lebanon Candidates (November 4, 2003, Lebanon Mayor and City Council General Election; November 5, 2002, Boone County Council District 3 General Election; May 7,2002, Boone County Commissioner District 1 Republican Primary)
Lebanon Cash Reserves
Lebanon City Attorney
Lebanon City Budgets: 2015 and 2016.
Lebanon City Council Election Districts
Lebanon City Expenditures Per Capita
Lebanon City Finances: 1997-2004 and 2004-2015
Lebanon Clerk-Treasurer Attorney
Lebanon Conservation League Purchase
Lebanon Eminent Domain Coercions
Lebanon "Gateways" - Indianapolis Avenue Project
Lebanon "Gateways" - SR 39 Bridge Project
Lebanon Growth Projections
Lebanon Hot Pond
Lebanon I-65 Corridor Annexation
Lebanon I-65 Corridor Master Drainage Plan
Lebanon Interchange Land Use Plan
Lebanon Iron Men Properties Projects: Memory Hall Flats, The Flats at Memory Hall, The 451 Flats.
Lebanon Memorial Park Swimming Pool
Lebanon Municipal Building
Lebanon Police Department Use of Force: Neck Area
Lebanon Property Tax Bills Database
Lebanon Property Tax Comparison: Residential and Farm.
Lebanon Property Tax Multiple Homestead Deductions
Lebanon Property Tax Rates
Lebanon Property Taxes
Lebanon Public Library Expansion
Lebanon Public Library Expenditures Per Capita
Lebanon Public Library Taxpayer Friendly Action Plan
Lebanon Redevelopment Commission
Lebanon Rental Inspections: Includes Lebanon 2014 & 2015 Fire Fatalities and Lebanon O.P.E.N. Rental Inspection Program.
Lebanon Schools - 2010 Referendum
Lebanon Schools - Alternative High School (The Crossing National, Inc.)
Lebanon Schools - Education Outcomes Comparison (Public School Corporations with Boone County Students): 2014 and 2013.
Lebanon Schools - Expenditures Per Capita & Student
Lebanon Schools - Finances
Lebanon Schools - Herman B Wells Community Conference Center
Lebanon Schools - Lebanon Business Park School Taxes
Lebanon Schools - New School Need
Lebanon Schools - Property Tax History
Lebanon Schools - Superintendent Compensation
Lebanon Sump Pump Program: Estimated Costs
Lebanon Storm Water Management - 2016 Proposed Fee Increases
Lebanon Storm Water Management - Overview
Lebanon Tax Abatements
Lebanon Taxpayer Friendly Smart Growth Plan
Lebanon Transportation Funding Increases
Lebanon Utilities - 2010 Operating Efficiency Analysis
Lebanon Utilities - Electric 2012 Rate Increase
Lebanon Utilities - Electric IURC Regulation
Lebanon Utilities - Elizaville Road Project
Lebanon Utilities - Fire Hydrants Analysis
Lebanon Utilities - Hydrant Rental Fee
Lebanon Utilities - New 69 kV Electric Transmission Line
Lebanon Utilities - Payments in Lieu of Taxes (PILOT)
Lebanon Utilities - Telecommunications Division Profitability
Lebanon Utilities - Wastewater 2015 Rate Increase
Lebanon Utilities - Wastewater (Sanitary Sewer) Backup Prevention
Lebanon Utilities - Wastewater (Sanitary Sewer) Financial Analysis 
Lebanon Utilities - Wastewater (Sanitary Sewer) Treatment Plant Operation
Lebanon Utilities - Water Financial Analysis
Lebanon Vincennes University Gene Haas Training and Education Center
Lebanon Watch Government Meetings Schedule
Lebanon Workforce Development Options
Lebanon Worth Annexation
Lebanon's FAILED "Vision"
Local Government Meetings Schedule
Petition and Remonstrance
Population Data: City Of Lebanon; Center Township; Boone County; State Of Indiana.
Public Access Laws
Related Sites: Boone County Area Plan Commission; Boone County Chamber of Commerce; Boone County Community Network; Boone County Economic Development Corporation; Boone County E-mail Directory; Boone County Farm Wells fargo checking account login page, Boone County Republicans; Boone county indiana republican party REMC; Lebanon (City Of), Indiana; Lebanon Community School Corporation; Lebanon Community Vision Committee.
Ronald Reagan Parkway
STATS Indiana: Provides easy, one-stop access to critical statistics for states, counties, cities and towns, townships, regions, census tracts, and more.
Unemployment Rates: Hoosiers By The Numbers.

 

Boone County Topics Index

Boone County Alcoholic Beverage Board
Boone County Appointed Local Government Boards
Boone County Candidate Information:
   2016 Boone County Commissioner Candidates: Andy Dardini, Larry Hysong, Don Lawson, Jeff Wolfe.
   2016 Boone County Council Candidates: Tad D. Braner, Brian Buchanan, Don Cooper, Steve Freeland, Jim Love, Elise Nieshalla, Dax Norton, Marcia C. Wilhoite.
   2014 Boone County Commissioner Candidates: Marc Applegate, Julia Evinger.
   2014 Boone County Council Candidates: Ken P. Campbell, Jon "Chip" Cravens, John W. Hamilton, John W. Hume, Jim Hundley, Steve Jacob, David Rodgers, Tom Santelli, Jay Schaumberg, Debby Shubert, Gene Thompson.
   2014 Boone County Superior Court 2 Judge Candidates: American savings bank hawaii Fundraising.
   2014 Center Township Board Candidates: Penny S. Bogan, Larry Hysong, Benjamin "Benjy" Johnson, Tami Richardson, Richard "Dick" Robertson, Jane Ann Taylor, Brent Wheat.
   2014 Center Township Trustee Candidates: Randall "Randy" Large, Eric R. Ping, Adam Walker, Robert L. Wirey.
   2012 Boone County Candidates (Boone County Council).
   2008 Boone County Candidates (Boone County Auditor Primary Election).
   2006 Boone County Candidates (Boone County Council General Election).
   2004 Boone County Candidates (November 2, 2004, Boone County Commissioners General Election; November 2, 2004, Boone County Council General Election; May 4, 2004, Boone County Commissioners Republican Primary; May homes for sale in mclennan county texas 4, 2004, Boone County Council Republican Primary).
   2002-03 Boone County Candidates (November 4, 2003, Lebanon Mayor and City Council General Election; November 5, 2002, Boone County Council District 3 General Election; May 7,2002, Boone County Commissioner District 1 Republican Primary).
   2002 Boone County Council Voting Record.
Boone County Campaign Contributions History (for selected local candidates within Boone County)
Boone County Commissioner Election Districts
Boone County Council 2014 Budget
Boone County Council 2015 Budget
Boone County Council 2021 Budget
Boone County Cumulative Capital Development Property Tax
Boone County Democratic Party Rules
Boone County Departments & Offices Employment: Compared With Twenty-Six Selected Indiana Counties.
Boone County Disbursements
Boone County Education Outcomes Comparison (Public School Corporations with Boone County Students): 2014 and 2013.
Boone County Expenditures Per Capita
Boone County Financial Analysis (Completed by Watchdog Indiana on April 19, 2012).
Boone County Growth Projections
Boone boone county indiana republican party County Highway Department
Boone County I-65 North Overlay District
   Overlay District for the Northern Portion of Interstate 65 
   I-65 North Overlay Zoning District Document 
   Land Owners Within I-65 North Overlay District 
   Overlay District Questions for I-65 North Corridor Land Owners
   I-65 North Overlay District Map
Boone County Key Bank Building Purchase
Boone County Local Governments Nepotism
Boone County Local Income Tax
Boone County Mapleview Rest Home
Boone County Park Tax
Boone County Police Departments
Boone County Property Tax Bills Database
Boone icici coral credit card visa vs mastercard County Property Tax Multiple Homestead Deductions
Boone County Property Taxes
Boone County Republican Party Rules
Boone County Sheriff: Use of Force: Neck Area and 2016 Business Plan and Office Management.
Boone County Solid Waste Management District
Boone County Tax Abatements
Boone County Tax Increment Financing Districts
Boone County Transportation Funding Increases
Boone County Utilities
Boone County Water Resources
Consumer Price Index
Convention Center
County Option Income Tax (COIT)
Duke Realty (Anson) Project.
Emergency Telephone System (E911) Fee
Free Speech Guarantees
Get-Ahead Wage
Indiana Statewide COVID-19 Statistics
Jeff Wolfe Campaign Contributions History
Local Government Meetings Schedule
Petition and Remonstrance
Population Data: City Of Lebanon; Center Township; Boone County; State Of Indiana.
Public Access Laws
Recount Commission: 2002 Boone County Commissioner District 1.
Related Sites: Boone County Area Plan Commission; Boone County Chamber of Commerce; Boone County Community Network; Boone County Economic Development Corporation; Boone County E-mail Directory; Boone County Farm Bureau, Boone County Republicans; Boone REMC; Lebanon (City Of), Indiana; Lebanon Community School Corporation; Lebanon Community Vision Committee.
Ronald Reagan Parkway
STATS Indiana: Provides easy, one-stop access to critical statistics for states, counties, cities and towns, townships, regions, census tracts, and more.
Thorntown Clerk-Treasurer Investigation
Unemployment Rates: Hoosiers By The Numbers.
Wheel Tax
Worth Township-Whitestown 2012 Reorganization (Approved Plan of Reorganization Town of Whitestown and Worth Township) (defeated by November 6, 2012 referendum).

 

Watchdog Salem LogoYou Can Help.
Listed below are several ways you can help control taxes and spending in Boone County.

Bookmark this website so you can easily visit Watchdog Lebanon often to help learn about cash revenues, cash spending, and long-term debt assumption in the various Boone County governmental units.

Suggest projects for Watchdog Lebanon to adopt. Please send an E-mail if you know of something that needs the attention of Watchdog Lebanon.

Register to vote. Send an E-mail to the Boone County Clerk to request information on how and where to register to vote.

Review the Watchdog Lebanon  "Boone County Candidate Information" and "Lebanon Candidate Information" (see the above Boone County Topics Index and Lebanon Topics Index) when deciding how to vote in a local Boone County election.

E-mail to the Editor of your local newspaper a letter or opinion article about local cash revenues, cash spending, and long-term debt assumption. Use Letters To The Editor Via E-mail to find the E-mail address of the Editor of your local newspaper.

Use the Local Government Factfinding List to understand and influence the revenues, spending, and long-term debt assumption decisions of your local government.

Watchdog Lebanon summarizes my use of Boone County, Indiana, as a case study to demonstrate how you can work to help control the revenue and spending growth of your local government. Understanding the Fundamental Watchdog Beliefs will help you understand the approach taken in this website. Please send an E-mail telling what you think about Watchdog Lebanon or anything else that comes to mind. Your comments, suggestions, problems, complaints, praise, and opinions are welcome.

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This page was last updated on 11/27/20.

Источник: http://www.finplaneducation.net/watchdog_lebanon.htm
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