north america states

TNC works across all 50 states to conserve the lands and waters on which life depends. North America Priority Landscapes. This game in English was played 19,780 times yesterday. North and Central America. Flag. North. The United States, 1830. Dixon Ryan Fox, Harper's Atlas of American History (New York, NY: Harper & Brothers Publishers, 1920). Downloaded from Maps ETC.

youtube video

50 States and Capitals of the United States of America - Learn geographic regions of the USA map

North america states -

How many countries are there in North America?

If you research how many countries are there in North America, you’ll find that the number 23 keeps coming up. Well, I agree – there are 23 countries in the North American continent. 

In terms of the continents, the ‘New World’, aka the Americas, is divided up into North and South American continents. It can be a little confusing because what about Central America, and the Caribbean? I’ll explain that further down. In this article, I’m focussing on the Continent of North America, if you want to check out how many countries in South America you’re in luck because I’ve just posted that list too.

North America is the third largest continent on the planet and covers over 9,000,000 square miles. The answer to how many countries are there in North America is 23, plus there are also a few dependent territories, which don’t make the cut as they’re not officially countries (like the British Virgin Islands, or BVI, for example). If you’re also wondering how many countries are there in the world, read my blog post about that. The answer is 197 by the way!

Me Visiting every country in North America

From April 2016 to March  2017 I visited all 23 countries in North America. Starting in Mexico, and Overlanding all the way down to Panama. From there, I flew to Colombia to study Spanish for a couple of months in Medellin, and then started the overland process again, all the way down to Ushuaia where I took a boat to Antarctica. After that, I flew from Ushuaia to Guiana and began to visit every country in the Caribbean. Quite the adventure, believe me!

Havana Classic Car Tour

So there are 23 countries in North America? What are they?

I’m sure that you don’t need me to tell you that the ‘big 3’ in North America are Canada, USA and Mexico. Canada occupies the most amount of land and the USA has the largest population. From a continental perspective, North America also includes both the regions of Central America and the Caribbean islands too. So, let’s look at all the countries in North America on my list of 23. 

  1. Antigua and Barbuda (Caribbean)
  2. Bahamas (Caribbean)
  3. Barbados (Caribbean)
  4. Belize (Central America)
  5. Canada
  6. Costa Rica (Central America)
  7. Cuba (Caribbean – don’t visit Cuba without experiencing the Havana Classic Car tour, so much fun!)
  8. Dominica (Caribbean)
  9. Dominican Republic (Caribbean)
  10. ElSalvador (Central America)
  11. Grenada (Caribbean)
  12. Guatemala (Central America)
  13. Haiti (Caribbean)
  14. Honduras (Central America)
  15. Jamaica (Caribbean)
  16. Mexico
  17. Nicaragua (Central America)
  18. Saint Kitts and Nevis (Caribbean)
  19. Panama (Central America)
  20. SaintLucia (Caribbean)
  21. Saint Vincent and the Grenadines (Caribbean)
  22. Trinidad and Tobago (Caribbean)
  23. United States of America 

Have a look for yourself here on the North America Countries Map:

How many countries in north america
How many countries make up North America

Why is Central America and the Caribbean counted as North America?

Prepare to be confused! Ok, sometimes people refer to North America and South America as Continental America, i.e together they are just 1 continent. However, most of the world use a 7 continent model, which means North and South America are broken up and considered as 2 separate continents, separating at the southern Panama border. With this in mind the 11 countries in Central America can’t be considered its own continent (it can be classed as a subcontinent since it lies within continental ‘America’). Equally then, geographically speaking, the Caribbean falls on top of the same tectonic plate as the rest of the North American countries listed, thereby including all of it within ‘North America’ too. 

If you’re curious about how many countries in the Caribbean specifically, the answer is 13! As well as 21 dependencies. You can read all about that in my blog post here. 

How many countries make up North America

Don’t Forget The 22 Dependent Territories In North America

If you’ve read some of my other articles then you’ll know all about territories that are dependencies of other countries. If you want to remind yourself about the definition of what a country is versus what a dependent territory is, then click here to read my simple explanation – you’ll soon see that it’s not easy to figure out what constitutes as a country. I know some people consider the following places countries, but unfortunately, they are not officially, or technically, countries!

The dependent territories in North America are:

  1. Anguilla (UK)
  2. Aruba (Netherlands)
  3. Bermuda (UK)
  4. Bonaire (Netherlands)
  5. British Virgin Islands (UK)
  6. Cayman Islands (UK)
  7. Clipperton Island (France)
  8. Curacao (Netherlands)
  9. Greenland (Denmark) – You maybe thought that Greenland was in Europe, but no, it’s in North America?
  10. Guadeloupe (France)
  11. Martinique (France)
  12. Montserrat (UK)
  13. Navassa Island (USA)
  14. Puerto Rico (USA)
  15. Saba (Netherlands)
  16. Saint Barthelemy (France)
  17. Saint Martin (France)
  18. Saint Pierre and Miquelon (France)
  19. Sint Eustatius (Netherlands)
  20. Sint Maarten (Netherlands)
  21. Turks and Caicos Islands (UK)
  22. US Virgin Islands (USA)

What’s Your Count of North America Countries?

I’m going to conclude that there are 23 countries in North America and 22 territories. How about you? It’d be interesting to hear what you guys think and also let me know how many of the 45 places above you’ve visited. Let me know what you’re thinking by popping your number in the comment section below along with your reasoning.

How many countries in North America?

Remember, never travel without travel insurance! And never overpay for travel insurance!

I use SafetyWing at $9 a week, and it's amazing. Also, it has great digital nomad insurance for people who are constantly travelling too! You can read my review here, and you can sign-up here

Also, if you want to start a blog...I CAN HELP YOU!

Also, if you want to start a blog, and start to change your life, I'd love to help you! Email me on [email protected] In the meantime, check out my super easy blog post on how to start a travel blog in under 30 minutes, here! And if you just want to get cracking, use BlueHost at a discount, through me.

Also, (if you're like me, and awful with tech-stuff) email me and my team can get a blog up and running for you, designed and everything, for $300 - email [email protected] to get started.

How about $55 free AirBnB credit?

Oh, one last thing! If you've never used AirBnB before, here's a $50 voucher for you! Enjoy!

sep-icons
teach-blog

So if you’re ready to…..

1) Change your life
2) Travel the world
3) Get paid to travel
4) Create a positive influence on others
5) Be free of offices and ‘real world’ rubbish

Then Sign Up Below and Let’s Get Started!

Related Articles on One Step 4Ward

Источник: https://onestep4ward.com/how-many-countries-are-there-in-north-america/

United States of America (US) - State/Province Table

The following table lists the valid state/province codes that you can use for the United States of America (<countryCode> = US):

Code

State/Province

AL

Alabama

AK

Alaska

AA

APO - AA

AE

APO - AE

AP

APO - AP

AZ

Arizona

AR

Arkansas

CA

California

CO

Colorado

CT

Connecticut

DE

Delaware

DC

District of Columbia

FL

Florida

GA

Georgia

HI

Hawaii

ID

Idaho

IL

Illinois

IN

Indiana

IA

Iowa

KS

Kansas

KY

Kentucky

LA

Louisiana

ME

Maine

MD

Maryland

MA

Massachusetts

MI

Michigan

MN

Minnesota

MS

Mississippi

MO

Missouri

MT

Montana

NE

Nebraska

NV

Nevada

NH

New Hampshire

NJ

New Jersey

NM

New Mexico

NY

New York

NC

North Carolina

ND

North Dakota

OH

Ohio

OK

Oklahoma

OR

Oregon

PA

Pennsylvania

RI

Rhode Island

SC

South Carolina

SD

South Dakota

TN

Tennessee

TX

Texas

UT

Utah

VT

Vermont

VA

Virginia

WA

Washington

WV

West Virginia

WI

Wisconsin

WY

Wyoming

Источник: http://www.factiva.com/CP_Developer/ProductHelp/FDK/FDK20/registration/shared_code_tables/state_province_table/united_states_state_province_table.htm
line icon of a light bulb

What is Doing Business North America?

The Doing Business North America (DBNA) project annually provides objective measures of the scale and scope of business regulations in 134 cities across 92 states, provinces, and federal districts of the U.S., Canada, and Mexico. It uses these measures to score and rank cities in regard to how easy or difficult it is to set up, operate, and shut down a business.

92

states, provinces and federal districts across the U.S., Canada and Mexico

111

variables spread over 6 categories

a person reading a book


Why is this report important now?

Over the years, researchers have begun to understand how robust measurement and ranking of regulations that either enhance business activity or constrain it can provide substantial insight into economic outcomes. Objective measurements of those regulations have been vital in this understanding. Unlike many studies that measure regulations at the state level, this annual study measures the impact at the city level and does so for over 100 municipal jurisdictions across North America.


Provide measurable benchmarks

This report will provide objective measurements of regulatory conditions and make them publicly-available to researchers and policymakers.


Encourage competition

This report will allow researchers and policymakers to track the improvement or decline in local regulatory conditions and provide a context for thinking about policy reform.


Increase economic well-being

The measures can help contribute to the understanding of which regulatory environments can produce the best economic outcomes for the largest number of people.

decorative icon of 10-pointed star made from interconnected circles


How is the data categorized?

This report collects data on 111 variables within the following six categories:

decorative icon


Explore the data sets

The Doing Business North America team collected data on 111 different regulatory and economic variables across six different categories. The data collected came entirely from official and publicly-available sources.

world map highlighting north america

View 2021 Report

Источник: https://dbna.asu.edu/

Platforms & Services

The Platforms & Services sector designs, develops, produces, supports, maintains, modernizes and upgrades armored combat vehicles, wheeled vehicles, naval guns, surface ship combatants, commercial vessels, missile launchers, artillery systems, military ordnance, and protective wear and armor.

With headquarters in Falls Church, Virginia, the global business has operations in the UK, Sweden and North America, with markets across the globe.

 

  • BAE Systems Platforms & Services HQ, 2941 Fairview Park Drive, Falls Church, Virginia, 22042 USA
  • BAE Systems Weapon Systems, 3317 8th Avenue, Aberdeen, South Dakota 57401 USA
    +1 605 226 2704
  • BAE Systems Combat Vehicles, 15 Windham Boulevard, Aiken, South Carolina 29805 USA
    +1 803 643 2500
  • BAE Systems Combat Vehicles, 2101 W. 10th Street, Anniston, Alabama 36201 USA
    +1 256 237 2841
  • BAE Systems Ship Repair, 8500 Heckscher Drive, Jacksonville, Florida 32226 USA
    +1 904 251 3111
  • BAE Systems Ship Repair, 1936 Bailey Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida 32228 USA
  • BAE Systems Weapon Systems, 163 Rochester Drive, Louisville, Kentucky 40214 USA
    +1 502 364 5797
  • BAE Systems Protection Systems, 120 McCammon Ridge Road, Highway 421, McKee, Kentucky 40447 USA
    +1 606 287 8361
  • BAE Systems Weapon Systems, 4800 East River Road, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55421 USA
    +1 763 571 9201
  • BAE Systems Ship Repair, 750 West Berkley Avenue, Norfolk, Virginia 23523 USA
    +1 757 494 4000
  • BAE Systems Combat Vehicles, 1100 Bairs Road, York, Pennsylvania 17405 USA
    +1 717 225 8000
  • BAE Systems Protection Systems, 7822 S. 46th Street, Phoenix, Arizona 85044 USA
    +1 602 643 7233
  • BAE Systems Ship Repair, 2205 East Belt, Foot of Sampson Street, San Diego, California 92113 USA
    +1 619 238 1000
  • BAE Systems Combat Vehicles, 6331 San Ignacio Ave., San Jose, California 95119 USA
  • BAE Systems Combat Vehicles, 34201 Van Dyke Avenue, Sterling Heights, Michigan 48312 USA
    +1 586 795 2220
Источник: https://www.baesystems.com/en-us/our-company/inc-businesses/platforms-and-services/locations/north-america

North America States 2021

Whether you're new to North America or you've been here for years, it's critical to know all 50 states that make up the United States. Each state is different from the last and varies in size and population. To understand them fully, here are the North American states.

Alabama

Alabama is one of the states in the southern region. The capital of the state is Montgomery, and it has 67 counties.

Alaska

Alaska is one of the lone states near Canada but is still part of the United States. The capital of the state is Juneau, and it has 27 counties.

Arizona

Arizona is one of the states in the southeast region. The capital of the state is Phoenix, and it has 15 counties.

Arkansas

Arkansas is one of the states in the Mid-South. The capital of the state is Little Rock, and it has 75 counties.

California

California is one of the largest states in the country. The capital of the state is Sacramento, and it has 58 counties.

Colorado

Colorado is one of the western states. The capital of the state is Denver, and it has 63 counties.

Connecticut

Connecticut is one of the northeastern states. The capital of the state is Hartford, and it only has 8 counties.

Delaware

Delaware is one of the smaller northeastern states. The capital of the state is Dover, and it has only 3 counties.

Florida

Florida is one of the most notable southeastern states. The capital of the state is Tallahassee, and it has 67 counties.

Georgia

Georgia is another state that's part of the south. The capital of the state is Atlanta, and it has 159 counties.

Hawaii

Hawaii is the second lone state and is located west of California. The capital of the state is Honolulu, and it has 67 counties.

Idaho

Idaho is one of the central states located in the northwest. The capital of the state is Boise, and it has 44 counties.

Illinois

Illinois is another notable northern state. The capital of the state is Springfield, and it has 102 counties.

Indiana

Indiana is another northern state that borders states like Illinois and Iowa. The capital of the state is Indianapolis, and it has 92 counties.

Iowa

Iowa is a northern state that borders states like Illinois and Minnesota. The capital of the state is Des Moines, and it has 99 counties.

Kansas

Kansas is a midwestern state that borders states like Colorado and Missouri. The capital of the state is Topeka, and it has 105 counties.

Kentucky

Kentucky is one of the southern states that border Tennessee and Virginia, just to name a few. The capital of the state is Frankford, and it has 120 counties.

Louisiana

Louisiana is one of the states located deep in the south and borders states like Texas and Mississippi. The capital of the state is Baton Rouge, and it has 64 counties.

Maine

Maine is a state in the northeastern part of the United States. The capital of the state is Augusta, and it has 16 counties.

Maryland

Maryland is one of the northeastern states that borders Pennsylvania and Delaware. The capital of the state is Annapolis, and it has 23 counties.

Massachusetts

Massachusetts is one of the well-known northeastern states that borders Connecticut and New York. The capital of the state is Boston, and it has 14 counties.

Michigan

Michigan is a northern state that borders states like Illinois and Indiana. The capital of the state is Lansing, and it has 83 countries.

Minnesota

Minnesota is a northern state that borders states like Iowa and Michigan. The capital of the state is St. Paul, and it has 87 counties.

Mississippi

Mississippi is a southern state that borders states like Tennessee and Alabama. The capital of the state is Jackson, and it has 82 counties.

Missouri

Missouri is a mid-southern state that borders states like Illinois and Arkansas. The capital of the state is Jefferson City, and it has 114 counties.

Montana

Montana is a northern state that borders states like Idaho and Colorado. The capital of the state is Helena, and it has 56 counties.

Nebraska

Nebraska is a northern state that borders states like Colorado and Kansas. The capital of the state is Lincoln, and it has 93 counties.

Nevada

Nevada is a western state that borders states like California and Arizona. The capital of the state is Carson City, and it has 17 counties.

New Hampshire

New Hampshire is a smaller northeastern state that borders states like Maine and Massachusetts. The capital of the state is Concord, and it has 10 counties.

New Jersey

New Jersey is a northeastern state that orders states like Delaware and New York. The capital of the state is Trenton, and it has 21 counties.

New Mexico

New Mexico is a southwestern state that borders states like Arizona and Colorado. The capital of the state is Santa Fe, and it has 33 counties.

New York

New York is a well-known northeastern state that borders states like Connecticut and New Jersey. The capital of the state is Albany, and it has 62 counties.

North Carolina

North Carolina is an eastern state that borders states like Georgia and Tennessee. The capital of the state is Raleigh, and it has 100 counties.

North Dakota

North Dakota is a northern state that borders states like South Dakota and Minnesota. The capital of the state is Bismarck, and it has 53 counties.

Ohio

Ohio is a midwestern state that borders states like Indiana and Kentucky. The capital of the state is Columbus, and it has 88 counties.

Oklahoma

Oklahoma is a southern state that borders states like Texas and New Mexico. The capital of the state is Oklahoma City, and it has 77 counties.

Oregon

Oregon is a western state that borders states like Washington and California. The capital of the state is Salem, and it has 36 counties.

Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania is a northeastern state that borders states like New York and New Jersey. The capital of the state is Harrisburg, and it has 67 counties.

Rhode Island

Rhode Island is a smaller northeastern state that borders states like Connecticut as Massachusetts. The capital of the state is Providence, and it has 5 counties.

South Carolina

South Carolina is an eastern state that borders states like North Carolina and Georgia. The capital of the state is Columbia, and it has 46 counties.

South Dakota

Such Dakota is a northern state that borders states like North Dakota and Iowa. The capital of the state is Pierre, and it has 66 counties.

Tennessee

Tennessee is a mid-southern state that borders states like Arkansas and Kentucky. The capital of the state is Nashville, and it has 95 counties.

Texas

Texas is a large southern state that borders states like Oklahoma and Arkansas. The capital of the state is Austin, and it has 254 counties.

Utah

Utah is a western state that borders states like Arizona and Colorado. The capital of the state is Salt Lake City, and it has 29 counties.

Vermont

Vermont is a small northeastern state that borders States like Massachusetts and New Hampshire. The capital of the state is Montpelier, and it has 14 counties.

Virginia

Virginia is an eastern state that borders states like Kentucky and Maryland. The capital of the state is Richmond, and it has 95 counties.

Washington

Washington is a northwestern state that borders states like Oregon and Idaho. The capital of the state is Olympia, and it has 39 counties.

West Virginia

West Virginia is the eastern state that's just above Virginia. The capital of the state is Charleston, and it has 55 counties.

Wisconsin

Wisconsin is the northern state that borders states like Iowa and Michigan. The capital of the state is Madison, and it has 72 counties.

Wyoming

Wyoming is the western state that borders states like Montana and Nebraska. The capital of the state is Cheyenne, and it has 23 counties.

Источник: https://worldpopulationreview.com/country-rankings/north-america-states

Contents

  1. The Vikings Discover the New World
  2. The Reformation, the Renaissance and New Trade Routes
  3. A Faster Route to the East 
  4. Portugal: Bartolomeu Dias, Vasco de Gama and Pedro Álvares Cabral
  5. Spain and Christopher Columbus
  6. Spanish Explorers After Columbus
  7. Religious Motivations
  8. France: Giovanni da Verrazano, Jacques Cartier and Samuel de Champlain
  9. The Netherlands: Henry Hudson Leads the Dutch
  10. England: John Cabot and Sir Walter Raleigh
  11. Sweden and Denmark
  12. Sources

The story of North American exploration spans an entire millennium and involves a wide array of European powers and uniquely American characters. It began with the Vikings’ brief stint in Newfoundland circa 1000 A.D. and continued through England’s colonization of the Atlantic coast in the 17th century, which laid the foundation for the United States of America. The centuries following the European arrivals would see the culmination of this effort, as Americans pushed westward across the continent, enticed by the lure of riches, open land and a desire to fulfill the nation’s manifest destiny.

The Vikings Discover the New World

The first attempt by Europeans to colonize the New World occurred around1000 A.D. when the Vikings sailed from the British Isles to Greenland, established a colony and then moved on to Labrador, the Baffin Islands and finally Newfoundland. There they established a colony named Vineland (meaning fertile region) and from that base sailed along the coast of North America, observing the flora, fauna and native peoples. Inexplicably, Vineland was abandoned after only a few years. 

Did you know? Explorer Henry Hudson died when his crew mutinied and left Hudson, his son and seven crewmembers adrift in a small open boat in the Hudson Bay.

Although the Vikings never returned to America, other Europeans came to know of their accomplishments. Europe, however, was made up of many small principalities whose concerns were mainly local. Europeans may have been intrigued by the stories of the feared Vikings’ discovery of a “new world,” but they lacked the resources or the will to follow their path of exploration. Trade continued to revolve around the Mediterranean Sea, as it had for hundreds of years.

The Reformation, the Renaissance and New Trade Routes

Between 1000 and 1650, a series of interconnected developments occurred in Europe that provided the impetus for the exploration and subsequent colonization of America. These developments included the Protestant Reformation and the subsequent Catholic Counter-Reformation, the Renaissance, the unification of small states into larger ones with centralized political power, the emergence of new technology in navigation and shipbuilding and the establishment of overland trade with the East and the accompanying transformation of the medieval economy.

The Protestant Reformation and the Catholic Church’s response in the Counter-Reformation marked the end of several centuries of gradual erosion of the power of the Catholic Church as well as the climax of internal attempts to reform the Church. Protestantism emphasized a personal relationship between each individual and God without the need for intercession by the institutional church. 

In the Renaissance, artists and writers such as Galileo, Machiavelli and Michelangelo adopted a view of life that stressed humans’ ability to change and control the world. Thus, the rise of Protestantism and the Counter-Reformation, along with the Renaissance, helped foster individualism and create a climate favorable to exploration.

At the same time, political centralization ended much of the squabbling and fighting among rival noble families and regions that had characterized the Middle Ages. With the decline of the political power and wealth of the Catholic Church, a few rulers gradually solidified their power. Portugal, Spain, France and England were transformed from small territories into nation-states with centralized authority in the hands of monarchs who were able to direct and finance overseas exploration.

As these religious and political changes were occurring, technological innovations in navigation set the stage for exploration. Bigger, faster ships and the invention of navigational devices such as the astrolabe and sextant made extended voyages possible.

A Faster Route to the East 

But the most powerful inducement to exploration was trade. Marco Polo’s famous journey to Cathay signaled Europe’s “discovery” of Chinese and Islamic civilizations. The Orient became a magnet to traders, and exotic products and wealth flowed into Europe. Those who benefited most were merchants who sat astride the great overland trade routes, especially the merchants of the Italian city-states of Genoa, Venice and Florence.

The newly unified states of the Atlantic–France, Spain, England and Portugal–and their ambitious monarchs were envious of the merchants and princes who dominated the land routes to the East. Moreover, in the latter half of the fifteenth century, war between European states and the Ottoman Empire greatly hampered Europe’s trade with the Orient. The desire to supplant the trade moguls, especially the Italians, and fear of the Ottoman Empire forced the Atlantic nations to search for a new route to the East.

Portugal: Bartolomeu Dias, Vasco de Gama and Pedro Álvares Cabral

Portugal led the others into exploration. Encouraged by Prince Henry the Navigator, Portuguese seamen sailed southward along the African coast, seeking a water route to the East. They were also looking for a legendary king named Prester John who had supposedly built a Christian stronghold somewhere in northwestern Africa. Henry hoped to form an alliance with Prester John to fight the Muslims. 

During Henry’s lifetime the Portuguese learned much about the African coastal area. His school developed the quadrant, the cross-staff and the compass, made advances in cartography and designed and built highly maneuverable little ships known as caravels.

After Henry’s death, Portuguese interest in long-distance trade and expansion waned until King John II commissioned Bartolomeu Dias to find a water route to India in 1487. Dias sailed around the tip of Africa and into the Indian Ocean before his frightened crew forced him to give up the quest. A year later, Vasco da Gama succeeded in reaching India and returned to Portugal laden with jewels and spices. 

In 1500, Pedro Álvares Cabral discovered and claimed Brazil for Portugal, and other Portuguese captains established trading posts in the South China Sea, the Bay of Bengal, and the Arabian Sea. These water routes to the East undercut the power of the Italian city-states, and Lisbon became Europe’s new trade capital.

Spain and Christopher Columbus

Christopher Columbus launched Spain’s imperial ambitions. Born in Genoa, Italy, around 1451, Columbus learned the art of navigation on voyages in the Mediterranean and the Atlantic. At some point he probably read Cardinal Pierre d’Ailly’s early fifteenth-century work, Imago mundi, which argued that the East could be found by sailing west of the Azores for a few days. 

Columbus, hoping to make such a voyage, spent years seeking a sponsor and finally found one in Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain after they defeated the Moors and could turn their attention to other projects.

In August 1492, Columbus sailed west with his now famous ships, Niña, Pinta and Santa María. After ten weeks he sighted an island in the Bahamas, which he named San Salvador. Thinking he had found islands near Japan, he sailed on until he reached Cuba (which he thought was mainland China) and later Haiti. 

Columbus returned to Spain with many products unknown to Europe–coconuts, tobacco, sweet corn, potatoes–and with tales of dark-skinned native peoples whom he called “Indians” because he assumed he had been sailing in the Indian Ocean.

Although Columbus found no gold or silver, he was hailed by Spain and much of Europe as the discoverer of d’Ailly’s western route to the East. John II of Portugal, however, believed Columbus had discovered islands in the Atlantic already claimed by Portugal and took the matter to Pope Alexander II. 

Twice the pope issued decrees supporting Spain’s claim to Columbus’s discoveries. But the territorial disputes between Portugal and Spain were not resolved until 1494 when they signed the Treaty of Tordesillas, which drew a line 370 leagues west of the Azores as the demarcation between the two empires.

Despite the treaty, controversy continued over what Columbus had found. He made three more voyages to America between 1494 and 1502, during which he explored Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Jamaica, and Trinidad. Each time he returned more certain that he had reached the East. 

Subsequent explorations by others, however, persuaded most Europeans that Columbus had discovered a “New World.” Ironically, that New World was named for someone else. A German geographer, Martin Waldseemüller, accepted the claim of Amerigo Vespucci that he had landed on the American mainland before Columbus. In 1507 Waldseemüller published a book in which he named the new land “America.”

READ MORE: The Ships of Christopher Columbus Were Sleek, Fast—and Cramped

Spanish Explorers After Columbus

More Spanish expeditions followed. Juan Ponce de León explored the coasts of Florida in 1513. Vasco Núñez de Balboa crossed the Isthmus of Panama and discovered the Pacific Ocean in the same year. 

Ferdinand Magellan’s expedition (in the course of which he put down a mutiny and was later killed) sailed around the tip of South America, across the Pacific to the Philippines, through the Indian Ocean and back to Europe around the southern tip of Africa between 1519 and 1522.

Two expeditions led directly to Spain’s emergence as sixteenth-century Europe’s wealthiest and most powerful nation. The first was headed by Hernán Cortés, who in 1519 led a small army of Spanish and Native Americans against the Aztec Empire of Mexico. Completing the conquest in 1521, Cortés took control of the Aztecs’ fabulous gold and silver mines. 

Ten years later, an expedition under Francisco Pizarro overwhelmed the Inca Empire of Peru, securing for the Spaniards the great Inca silver mines of Potosí.

In 1535 and 1536, Pedro de Mendoza went as far as present-day Buenos Aires in Argentina, where he founded a colony. At the same time, Cabeza de Vaca explored the North American Southwest, adding that region to Spain’s New World empire.

A few years later (1539-1542), Francisco Vásquez de Coronado discovered the Grand Canyon and journeyed through much of the Southwest looking for gold and the legendary Seven Cities of Cíbola. About the same time, Hernando de Soto explored southeastern North America from Florida to the Mississippi River. By 1650, Spain’s empire was complete and fleets of ships were carrying the plunder back to Spain.

Religious Motivations

As European powers conquered the territories of the New World, they justified wars against Native Americans and the destruction of their cultures as a fulfillment of the European secular and religious vision of the New World. The idea of “America” antedated America’s discovery and even Viking exploration. 

That idea had two parts: one paradisiacal and utopian, the other savage and dangerous. Ancient tales described distant civilizations, usually to the west, where European-like peoples lived simple, virtuous lives without war, famine, disease or poverty. Such utopian visions were reinforced by religious notions. Early Christian Europeans had inherited from the Jews a powerful prophetic tradition that drew upon apocalyptic biblical texts in the books of Daniel, Isaiah and Revelations. They connected the Christianization of the world with the second coming of Christ. Such ideas led many Europeans (including Columbus) to believe it was God’s plan for Christians to convert pagans wherever they were found.

If secular and religious traditions evoked utopian visions of the New World, they also induced nightmares. The ancients described wonderful civilizations, but barbaric, evil ones as well. Moreover, late medieval Christianity inherited a rich tradition of hatred for non-Christians derived in part from the Crusaders' struggle to free the Holy Land and from warfare against the Moors.

European encounters with the New World were viewed in light of these preconceived notions. To plunder the New World of its treasures was acceptable because it was populated by pagans. To Christianize the pagans was necessary because it was part of God’s plan; to kill them was right because they were Satan’s warriors. 

France: Giovanni da Verrazano, Jacques Cartier and Samuel de Champlain

While Spain was building its New World empire, France was also exploring the Americas. In 1524, Giovanni da Verrazzano was commissioned to locate a northwest passage around North America to India. He was followed in 1534 by Jacques Cartier, who explored the St. Lawrence River as far as present-day Montreal. 

In 1562, Jean Ribault headed an expedition that explored the St. Johns River area in Florida. His efforts were followed two years later by a second venture headed by René Goulaine de Laudonnière. But the Spanish soon pushed the French out of Florida, and thereafter, the French directed their efforts north and west. In 1608 Samuel de Champlain built a fort at Quebec and explored the area north to Port Royal and Nova Scotia and south to Cape Cod.

Unlike Spain’s empire, “New France” produced no caches of gold and silver. Instead, the French traded with inland tribes for furs and fished off the coast of Newfoundland. New France was sparsely populated by trappers and missionaries and dotted with military forts and trading posts. Although the French sought to colonize the area, the growth of settlements was stifled by inconsistent policies. 

Initially, France encouraged colonization by granting charters to fur-trading companies. Then, under Cardinal Richelieu, control of the empire was put in the hands of the government-sponsored Company of New France. The company, however, was not successful, and in 1663 the king took direct control of New France. Although more prosperous under this administration, the French empire failed to match the wealth of New Spain or the growth of neighboring British colonies.

The Netherlands: Henry Hudson Leads the Dutch

The Dutch were also engaged in the exploration of America. Formerly a Protestant province of Spain, the Netherlands was determined to become a commercial power and saw exploration as a means to that end. 

In 1609, Henry Hudson led an expedition to America for the Dutch East India Company and laid claim to the area along the Hudson River as far as present-day Albany. In 1614 the newly formed New Netherland Company obtained a grant from the Dutch government for the territory between New France and Virginia. About ten years later another trading company, the West India Company, settled groups of colonists on Manhattan Island and at Fort Orange. The Dutch also planted trading colonies in the West Indies.

England: John Cabot and Sir Walter Raleigh

In 1497 Henry VII of England sponsored an expedition to the New World headed by John Cabot, who explored a part of Newfoundland and reported an abundance of fish. But until Queen Elizabeth’s reign, the English showed little interest in exploration, being preoccupied with their European trade and establishing control over the British Isles. 

By the mid-sixteenth century, however, England had recognized the advantages of trade with the East, and in 1560 English merchants enlisted Martin Frobisher to search for a northwest passage to India. Between 1576 and 1578 Frobisher as well as John Davis explored along the Atlantic coast.

Thereafter, Queen Elizabeth granted charters to Sir Humphrey Gilbert and Sir Walter Raleigh to colonize America. Gilbert headed two trips to the New World. He landed on Newfoundland but was unable to carry out his intention of establishing military posts. A year later, Raleigh sent a company to explore territory he named Virginia after Elizabeth, the “Virgin Queen,” and in 1585, he sponsored a second voyage, this time to explore the Chesapeake Bay region. By the seventeenth century, the English had taken the lead in colonizing North America, establishing settlements all along the Atlantic coast and in the West Indies.

Sweden and Denmark

Sweden and Denmark also succumbed to the attractions of America, although to a lesser extent. In 1638, the Swedish West India Company established a settlement on the Delaware River near present-day Wilmington called Fort Christina. This colony was short-lived, however, and was taken over by the Dutch in 1655. The king of Denmark chartered the Danish West India Company in 1671, and the Danes established colonies in St. Croix and other islands in the cluster of the Virgin Islands.

READ MORE: America's Forgotten Swedish Colony 

Sources

Samuel Eliot Morison, The European Discovery of America: The Northern Voyages, a.d. 500-1600 (1971); John H. Parry, The Spanish Seaborne Empire (1966; 2nd ed., 1980); David B. Quinn, England and the Discovery of America, 1481-1620, from the Bristol Voyages of the Fifteenth Century to the Pilgrim Settlement at Plymouth: The Exploration, Exploitation, and Trial-and-Error Colonization of North America by the English (1974).

Источник: https://www.history.com

Northern United States

Region in the United States

The Northern United States, commonly referred to as the American North, the Northern States, or simply the North, is a geographical or historical region of the United States.

Geographic term[edit]

Geographically, the term includes the U.S. states and regions of the United States of America that are located across the northernmost part of the country. It includes states along the Canada–United States border.

Census Bureau[edit]

The United States Census Bureau divides some of the northernmost United States into the Midwest Region and the Northeast Region.[3] The Census Bureau also includes the northernmost states of the Northwest, that are within the West Region.[3]

Historical term[edit]

Before 19th-century westward expansion, the "Northern United States" corresponded to the present day New England region. By the 1830s it corresponded to the present day Northeast.

Before 1865, the North was distinguished from the South on the issue of slavery. In Southern states, slavery was legal until the ratification of the 13th Amendment in 1865. Northern states had all passed some form of legislation to abolish slavery by 1804. However, abolition did not mean freedom for some existing slaves. Due to gradual abolition laws, slaves would still appear in some Northern states as far as the 1840 United States Census.[4] Slavery would ultimately be the main cause of the American Civil War.

American Civil War[edit]

Main article: Union (American Civil War)

During the American Civil War, the Northern United States comprised the U.S. states that supported the United States of America (the Union states); in this context, "The North" is synonymous with "the Union," while "The South" refers to the states that seceded from the U.S. in order to form the Confederate States of America.

There is, however, some historical disagreement as to exactly which states comprised "The North" in the context of the Civil War as five slave-holding states remained with the union: the Border states of Missouri, Kentucky, West Virginia, Maryland, and Delaware, alongside the disputed Indian Territory; depending on the source, these states and territories may be included in either region.[5]

Climate[edit]

The Northern United States climate is mostly Humid continental climate and some of it has Humid subtropical climate. The Northern United states mostly gets snow during the winter.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^"United States Summary: 2010, Population and Housing Unit Counts, 2010 Census of Population and Housing"(PDF). United States Census Bureau. September 2012. pp. V–2, 1 & 41 (Tables 1 & 18). Retrieved February 7, 2014.
  2. ^"Population, Population Change, and Estimated Components of Population Change: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2019 (NST-EST2019-alldata)". Census.gov. United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on January 26, 2020. Retrieved 8 February 2020.
  3. ^ ab"Census Regions and Divisions of the United States"(PDF). United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original(PDF) on 2013-01-07. Retrieved 2009-10-27.
  4. ^Klein, Christopher. (Feb 5, 2019). Deeper Roots of Northern Slavery Unearthed - HISTORY. Retrieved Jul 28, 2020.
  5. ^"the North (region, United States)". Encyclopædia Britannica Online. 2009. Retrieved 2009-10-27.
Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northern_United_States
north america states

United States Regions north america states north america states

A region is an area of land that has common features. A region can be defined by natural or artificial features. Language, government, or religion can define a region, as can forests, wildlife, or climate. A common way of referring to regions in the United States is grouping them into 5 regions according to their geographic position on the continent: the Northeast, Southwest, West, Southeast, and Midwest. Geographers who study regions may also find other physical or cultural similarities or differences between these areas.

  1. According to the maps, which states are included in the Northeast region of the United States?

    • Answer

      Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Vermont.

  2. According to the maps, which states are included in the Southeast region of the United States?

    • Answer

      Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia.

  3. According to the maps, which states are included in the Midwest region of the United States?

    • Answer

      Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio, North Dakota, Nebraska, South Dakota, and Wisconsin.

  4. According to the maps, which states are included in the Southwest region of the United States?

    • Answer

      Arizona, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas.

  5. According to the maps, which states are included in the West region of the United States?

    • Answer

      Alaska, California, Colorado, Hawai'i, Idaho, Nevada, Montana, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.

Источник: https://www.nationalgeographic.org/maps/united-states-regions/

United States United States North AmericaCurrent Local Time & Date, Time Zone and Time Difference

The USA is located in North America, bordered to the south by Mexico and to the north by Canada. Hawaii, an island state, is in the Pacific Ocean and Alaska is separated from the rest of the country by Canada. The capital, Washington DC, is in the north east. The time zones for the mainland states are Eastern Time, Central Time, Mountain Time and Pacific Time. Unusually, Arizona does not observe Daylight Savings Time.

How many time zones does United States have?

United States has 29 time zones and a time difference from UTC-10 to UTC-5.

29 Time Zones

Time Zones (29)

Time ZoneUniversal Time CoordinatedCurrent local timeMajor Cities in Time Zone
America/AdakUTC-1010:33
Pacific/HonoluluUTC-1010:33Honolulu, East Honolulu, Pearl City, Hilo, Kailua
America/AnchorageUTC-911:33Anchorage, Fairbanks, Eagle River, Badger, Knik-Fairview
America/JuneauUTC-911:33Juneau
America/MetlakatlaUTC-911:33
America/NomeUTC-911:33
America/SitkaUTC-911:33Sitka, Ketchikan
America/YakutatUTC-911:33
America/Los_AngelesUTC-812:33Los Angeles, San Diego, San Jose, San Francisco, Seattle
America/BoiseUTC-713:33Boise, Meridian, Nampa, Idaho Falls, Pocatello
America/DenverUTC-713:33Denver, El Paso, Albuquerque, Colorado Springs, Aurora
America/PhoenixUTC-713:33Phoenix, Tucson, Mesa, Chandler, Gilbert
America/ChicagoUTC-614:33Chicago, Houston, San Antonio, Dallas, Austin
America/Indiana/KnoxUTC-614:33
America/Indiana/Tell_CityUTC-614:33Tell City
America/MenomineeUTC-614:33Menominee, Iron Mountain, Kingsford, Ironwood, Iron River
America/North_Dakota/BeulahUTC-614:33
America/North_Dakota/CenterUTC-614:33
America/North_Dakota/New_SalemUTC-614:33Mandan
America/DetroitUTC-515:33Detroit, Grand Rapids, Warren, Sterling Heights, Ann Arbor
America/Indiana/IndianapolisUTC-515:33Indianapolis, Fort Wayne, South Bend, Carmel, Bloomington
America/Indiana/MarengoUTC-515:33
America/Indiana/PetersburgUTC-515:33
America/Indiana/VevayUTC-515:33
America/Indiana/VincennesUTC-515:33Vincennes, Jasper, Washington, Huntingburg
America/Indiana/WinamacUTC-515:33
America/Kentucky/LouisvilleUTC-515:33Louisville, Jeffersonville, New Albany, Jeffersontown, Pleasure Ridge Park
America/Kentucky/MonticelloUTC-515:33Monticello
America/New_YorkUTC-515:33New York City, Brooklyn, Queens, Philadelphia, Manhattan
Источник: https://www.zeitverschiebung.net/en/country/us

Contents

  1. The Vikings Discover the New World
  2. The Reformation, the Renaissance and New Trade Routes
  3. A Faster Route to the East 
  4. Portugal: Bartolomeu North america states, Vasco de Gama and Pedro Álvares Cabral
  5. Spain and Christopher Columbus
  6. Spanish Explorers After Columbus
  7. Religious Motivations
  8. France: Giovanni da Verrazano, Jacques Cartier and Samuel de Champlain
  9. The Netherlands: Henry Hudson Leads the Dutch
  10. England: John Cabot and Sir Walter Raleigh
  11. Sweden and North america states
  12. Sources

The story of North American exploration spans an entire millennium and involves a wide array of European powers and uniquely American characters. It began with the Vikings’ brief stint in Newfoundland circa 1000 A.D. and continued through England’s colonization of the Atlantic coast in the 17th century, which laid the foundation for the United States of America. The centuries following the European arrivals would see the culmination of this effort, as Americans pushed westward across the continent, enticed by the lure of riches, open land and a desire to fulfill the nation’s manifest destiny.

The Vikings Discover the New World

The first attempt north america states Europeans to colonize the New World occurred around1000 A.D. when the Vikings sailed from the British Isles to Greenland, established a colony and then moved on to Labrador, the Baffin Islands and finally Newfoundland. There they established a colony named Vineland (meaning fertile region) and from that base sailed along the coast of North America, observing the flora, fauna and native peoples. Inexplicably, Vineland was abandoned after only a few years. 

Did you know? Explorer Henry Hudson died when his crew mutinied and left Hudson, his son and seven crewmembers adrift in a small open boat in the Hudson Bay.

Although the Vikings never returned to America, other Europeans came to know of their accomplishments. Europe, however, was made up of many small principalities whose concerns were mainly local. Europeans may have been intrigued by the stories of the feared Vikings’ discovery of a “new world,” but they lacked the resources or the will to follow their path of exploration. Trade continued to revolve around the Mediterranean Sea, as it had for hundreds of years.

The Reformation, the Renaissance and New Trade Routes

Between 1000 and 1650, a series of interconnected developments occurred in Europe that provided the impetus for the exploration and subsequent colonization of America. These developments included the Protestant Reformation and the subsequent Catholic Counter-Reformation, the Renaissance, the unification of small states into larger ones with centralized political power, the emergence of new technology in navigation and shipbuilding and the establishment of overland trade with the East and the accompanying transformation of the medieval economy.

The Protestant Reformation and the Catholic Church’s response in the Counter-Reformation marked the end of several centuries of gradual erosion of the power of the Catholic Church as well as the climax of internal attempts to reform the Church. Protestantism emphasized a personal relationship between each individual and God without the need for intercession by the institutional church. 

In the Renaissance, artists and writers such as Galileo, Machiavelli and Michelangelo adopted a view of life that stressed humans’ ability to change and control the world. Thus, the rise of Protestantism and the Counter-Reformation, along with the Renaissance, helped foster individualism and create a climate favorable to exploration.

At the same time, political centralization ended much of the squabbling and fighting among rival noble families and regions that had characterized the Middle Ages. With the decline of the political power and wealth of the Catholic Church, a few rulers gradually solidified their power. Portugal, Spain, France and England were transformed homes for sale in san pablo jacksonville fl small territories into nation-states with centralized authority in the hands of monarchs capital one costco credit card login were able to direct and finance overseas exploration.

As these religious and political changes were occurring, technological innovations in navigation set the stage for exploration. Bigger, faster ships and the invention of navigational devices such as the astrolabe and sextant made extended voyages possible.

A Faster Route to the East 

But the most powerful inducement to exploration was trade. Marco Polo’s famous journey to Cathay signaled Europe’s “discovery” of Chinese and Islamic civilizations. The Orient became a magnet to traders, and exotic products and wealth flowed into Europe. Those who benefited most were merchants who sat astride the great overland trade routes, especially the merchants of the Italian city-states of Genoa, Venice and Florence.

The newly unified states of the Atlantic–France, Spain, England and Portugal–and their ambitious monarchs were envious of the merchants and princes who dominated the land routes to the East. Moreover, in the latter half of the fifteenth century, war between European states and the Ottoman Empire greatly hampered Europe’s trade with the Orient. The desire to supplant the trade moguls, especially the Italians, and fear of the Ottoman Empire forced the Atlantic nations to search for a h&m stock price route to the East.

Portugal: Bartolomeu Dias, Vasco de Gama and Pedro tyra moore doggystyle Cabral

Portugal led the others into exploration. Encouraged by Prince Henry the Navigator, Portuguese seamen sailed southward along the African coast, seeking a water route to the East. They were also looking for a legendary king named Prester John who had supposedly built a Christian stronghold somewhere in northwestern Africa. Henry hoped to form an alliance with Prester John to fight the Muslims. 

During Henry’s lifetime the Portuguese learned much about the African coastal area. His school developed the quadrant, the cross-staff and the compass, made north america states in cartography and designed and built highly maneuverable little ocwen mortgage login gmac known as caravels.

After Henry’s death, Portuguese interest in long-distance trade and expansion waned until King John II commissioned Bartolomeu Dias to find a water route to India in 1487. Dias sailed around the tip of Africa and into the Indian Ocean before his frightened crew forced him to give up the quest. A year later, Vasco da Gama succeeded in reaching India and returned to Portugal laden with jewels and spices. 

In 1500, Pedro Álvares Cabral discovered and claimed Brazil for Portugal, and other Portuguese captains established trading posts in the South China Sea, the Bay of Bengal, and the Arabian Sea. These water routes to the East undercut the power of the Italian city-states, and Lisbon became Europe’s new trade capital.

Spain and Christopher Columbus

Christopher Columbus launched Spain’s imperial ambitions. Born in Genoa, Italy, around 1451, Columbus learned the art of navigation on voyages in the Mediterranean and the Atlantic. At some point he probably read Cardinal Pierre d’Ailly’s early fifteenth-century work, Imago mundi, which argued that the East could be found by sailing west of the Azores for a few days. 

Columbus, hoping to make such a voyage, spent years seeking 1990 donruss baseball cards worth money sponsor and finally found one in Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain after they defeated the Moors and could turn their attention to other projects.

In August 1492, Columbus sailed west with his now famous ships, Niña, Pinta and Santa María. After ten weeks he sighted an island in the Bahamas, which he named San Salvador. Thinking he had found islands near Japan, he sailed on until he reached Cuba (which he thought was mainland China) and later Haiti. 

Columbus returned to Spain with many products unknown to Europe–coconuts, tobacco, sweet corn, potatoes–and with tales of dark-skinned native peoples whom he called “Indians” because he assumed he had been sailing in the Indian Ocean.

Although Columbus found no gold or silver, he was hailed by Spain and much of Europe as the discoverer of d’Ailly’s western route to the East. John II of Portugal, however, believed Columbus had discovered islands in the Atlantic already claimed by Portugal and took the matter to Pope Alexander II. 

Twice the pope issued decrees supporting Spain’s claim to Columbus’s discoveries. But the territorial disputes between Portugal and Spain were not resolved until 1494 when they signed the Treaty of Tordesillas, which drew a line 370 leagues west of the Azores as the demarcation between the two empires.

Despite the treaty, controversy continued over what Columbus had found. He made three more voyages to America between 1494 and 1502, during which he explored Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Jamaica, and Trinidad. Each time he returned more certain that he had reached the East. 

Subsequent explorations by others, however, persuaded most Europeans that Columbus had discovered a “New World.” Ironically, that New World was named for someone else. A German geographer, Martin Waldseemüller, accepted the claim of Amerigo Vespucci that he had landed on the American mainland before Columbus. In 1507 Waldseemüller published a book in which he named the new land “America.”

READ MORE: The Ships of Christopher Columbus Were Sleek, Fast—and Cramped

Spanish Explorers After Columbus

More Spanish expeditions followed. Juan Ponce de León explored the coasts of Florida in 1513. Vasco Núñez de Balboa crossed the Isthmus of Panama and discovered the Pacific Ocean in the same year. 

Ferdinand Magellan’s expedition (in the course of which he put down a mutiny and was later killed) sailed around the tip of South America, across the Pacific to the Philippines, through the Indian Ocean and back to Europe around the southern tip of Africa between 1519 and 1522.

Two expeditions led directly to Spain’s emergence as sixteenth-century Europe’s wealthiest and most powerful nation. The first was headed by Hernán Cortés, who in 1519 led a small army of Spanish and Native Americans against the Aztec Empire of Mexico. Completing the conquest in 1521, Cortés took control of the Aztecs’ fabulous gold and silver mines. 

Ten years later, an expedition under Francisco Pizarro overwhelmed the Inca Empire of Peru, securing for the Spaniards the great Inca silver mines of Potosí.

In 1535 and 1536, Pedro de Mendoza went as far as present-day Buenos Aires in Argentina, where he founded a colony. At the same time, Cabeza de Vaca explored the North American Southwest, adding that region to Spain’s New World empire.

A few years later (1539-1542), Francisco Vásquez de Coronado discovered the Grand Canyon and journeyed through much of the Southwest looking for gold and the legendary Seven Cities of Cíbola. About the same time, Hernando de Soto explored southeastern North America from Florida to the Mississippi River. By 1650, Spain’s empire was complete and fleets of ships were carrying the plunder back to Spain.

Religious Motivations

As European powers conquered the territories of the New World, they justified wars against Native Americans and the destruction of their cultures as a fulfillment of the European secular and religious vision of the New World. The idea of “America” antedated America’s discovery and even Viking exploration. 

That idea had two parts: one paradisiacal and utopian, the other savage and dangerous. Ancient tales described distant civilizations, usually to the west, where European-like peoples lived simple, virtuous lives without war, famine, disease or poverty. Such utopian visions were reinforced by religious notions. Early Christian Europeans had inherited from the Jews a powerful https www t online de login tradition that drew upon apocalyptic biblical texts in the books of Daniel, Isaiah and Revelations. They connected the Christianization of the world with the second coming of Christ. Such ideas led many Europeans (including Columbus) to believe it was God’s plan for Christians to convert pagans wherever they were found.

If secular and religious traditions evoked utopian visions of the New World, they also induced nightmares. The ancients described wonderful civilizations, but barbaric, evil ones as well. Moreover, late medieval Christianity inherited a rich tradition of hatred for non-Christians derived in part from the Crusaders' struggle to free the Holy Land and from warfare against the Moors.

European encounters with the New World were viewed in light of these preconceived notions. To plunder the New World of its treasures was acceptable because it was populated by pagans. To Christianize the pagans was necessary because it was part of God’s plan; to kill them was right because they were Satan’s warriors. 

France: Giovanni da Verrazano, Jacques Cartier and Samuel de Champlain

While Spain was building its New World empire, France was also exploring the Americas. In 1524, Giovanni da Verrazzano was commissioned to locate a northwest passage around North America to India. He was followed in 1534 by Jacques Cartier, who explored the St. Lawrence River as far as present-day Montreal. 

In 1562, Jean Ribault headed an expedition that explored the St. Credit one visa login River area in Florida. His efforts were followed two years later by a second venture headed by René Goulaine de Laudonnière. But the Spanish soon pushed the French out of Florida, and thereafter, the French directed their efforts north and west. In 1608 Samuel de Champlain built a fort at Quebec and explored the area north to Port Royal and Nova Scotia and south to Cape Cod.

Unlike Spain’s empire, “New France” produced no caches of gold and silver. Instead, the French traded with inland tribes for furs and fished off the coast of Newfoundland. New France was sparsely populated by trappers and missionaries and dotted with military forts and trading posts. Although the French sought to colonize the area, the growth of settlements was stifled by inconsistent policies. 

Initially, France encouraged colonization by granting charters to fur-trading companies. Then, under Cardinal Richelieu, control of the empire was put in the hands of the government-sponsored Company of New France. The company, however, was not successful, and in 1663 the king took direct control of New France. Although more prosperous under this administration, the French empire failed to match the wealth of New Spain or the growth of neighboring British colonies.

The Netherlands: Henry Hudson Leads the Dutch

The Dutch were also engaged in the exploration of America. Formerly a Protestant province of Spain, the Netherlands was determined to become a commercial power and saw exploration as a means to that end. 

In 1609, Henry Hudson led an expedition to America for the Dutch East India Company and laid claim to the area along the Hudson River as far as present-day Albany. In 1614 the newly formed New Netherland Company obtained a grant from the Dutch government for the territory between New France and Virginia. About ten years later another trading company, the West India Company, settled groups of colonists on Manhattan Island and at Fort Orange. The Dutch also planted trading colonies in the West Indies.

England: John Cabot and Sir Walter Raleigh

In 1497 Henry VII of England sponsored an expedition to the New World headed by John Cabot, who explored a part of Newfoundland and reported an abundance of fish. But until Queen Elizabeth’s reign, the English showed little interest in exploration, being preoccupied with their European trade and establishing control over the British Isles. 

By the mid-sixteenth century, however, England had recognized the advantages of trade with the East, and in 1560 English merchants enlisted Martin Frobisher to search for a northwest passage to India. Between 1576 and 1578 Frobisher as well as John Davis explored along the Atlantic coast.

Thereafter, Queen Elizabeth granted charters to Sir Humphrey Gilbert and Sir Walter Raleigh to colonize America. Gilbert headed two trips to the New World. He landed on Newfoundland but was unable to carry out his intention of establishing military posts. A year later, Raleigh sent a company to explore territory he named Virginia after Elizabeth, the “Virgin Queen,” and in 1585, he sponsored a second voyage, this time to explore the Chesapeake Bay region. By the seventeenth century, the English had taken the lead in colonizing North America, establishing settlements all along the Atlantic coast and in the West Indies.

Sweden and Denmark

Sweden and Denmark also succumbed to the attractions of America, although to a lesser extent. In 1638, the Swedish West North america states Company established a settlement on the Delaware River near present-day Wilmington called Fort Christina. This colony was short-lived, however, and was taken over by the Dutch in 1655. The king of Denmark chartered the Danish West India Company in 1671, and the Danes established colonies in St. Fcbc worship and other islands in the cluster of the Virgin Islands.

READ MORE: America's Forgotten Swedish Colony 

Sources

Samuel Eliot Morison, The European Discovery of America: The Northern Voyages, a.d. 500-1600 (1971); John H. Parry, The Spanish Seaborne Empire (1966; 2nd ed., 1980); David B. Quinn, England and the Discovery of America, 1481-1620, from the Bristol Voyages of the Fifteenth Century to the Pilgrim Settlement at Plymouth: The Exploration, Exploitation, and Trial-and-Error Colonization of North America by the English (1974).

Источник: https://www.history.com

Platforms & Services

The Platforms & Services sector designs, develops, produces, supports, maintains, modernizes and upgrades armored combat vehicles, wheeled vehicles, naval guns, surface ship combatants, commercial vessels, missile launchers, artillery systems, military ordnance, and protective wear and armor.

With headquarters in Falls Church, Virginia, the global business has operations in the UK, Sweden and North America, with markets across my amazon payments account globe.

 

  • BAE Systems Platforms & Services HQ, 2941 Fairview Park Drive, Falls Church, Virginia, 22042 USA
  • BAE Systems Weapon Systems, 3317 8th Avenue, Aberdeen, South Dakota 57401 USA
    +1 605 226 2704
  • BAE Systems Combat Vehicles, 15 Windham Boulevard, Aiken, South Carolina 29805 USA
    +1 803 643 2500
  • BAE Systems Combat Vehicles, 2101 W. 10th Street, Anniston, Alabama 36201 USA
    +1 256 237 2841
  • BAE Systems Ship Repair, 8500 Heckscher Drive, Jacksonville, Florida 32226 USA
    +1 904 251 3111
  • BAE Systems Ship Repair, 1936 Bailey Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida 32228 USA
  • BAE Systems Weapon Systems, 163 Rochester Drive, Louisville, Kentucky 40214 USA
    +1 502 364 5797
  • BAE Systems Protection Systems, 120 McCammon Ridge Road, Highway 421, McKee, Kentucky 40447 USA
    +1 606 287 8361
  • BAE Systems Weapon Systems, 4800 East River Road, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55421 USA
    +1 763 571 9201
  • BAE Systems Ship Repair, 750 West Berkley Avenue, Norfolk, Virginia 23523 USA
    +1 757 494 4000
  • BAE Systems Combat Vehicles, 1100 Bairs Road, York, Pennsylvania 17405 USA
    +1 717 225 8000
  • BAE Systems Protection Systems, 7822 S. 46th Street, Phoenix, Arizona 85044 USA
    +1 602 643 7233
  • BAE Systems Ship Repair, 2205 East Belt, Foot of Sampson Street, San Diego, California 92113 USA
    +1 619 238 1000
  • BAE Systems Combat Vehicles, 6331 San Ignacio Ave., San Jose, California 95119 USA
  • BAE Systems Combat Vehicles, 34201 Van Dyke Avenue, North america states Heights, Michigan 48312 USA
    +1 586 795 2220
Источник: https://www.baesystems.com/en-us/our-company/inc-businesses/platforms-and-services/locations/north-america
line icon of a light bulb

What is Doing Business North America?

The Doing Business North America (DBNA) project annually provides objective measures of the scale and scope of business regulations in 134 cities across 92 states, provinces, and federal districts of the U.S., Canada, and Mexico. It uses these measures to score and rank cities in regard to how easy or difficult it is to set up, operate, and shut down a business.

92

states, provinces and federal districts across the U.S., Canada and Mexico

111

variables spread over 6 categories

a person reading a book


Why is this report important now?

Over the years, researchers have begun to understand how robust measurement and ranking of regulations that either enhance business activity or constrain it can provide substantial insight into economic outcomes. Objective measurements of those regulations have been vital in this understanding. Unlike many studies that measure regulations at american express delta bill pay state level, this annual study measures the impact at the city level and does so for over 100 municipal jurisdictions across North America.


Provide measurable benchmarks

This report will provide objective measurements of regulatory conditions and make them publicly-available to researchers and policymakers.


Encourage competition

This report will allow researchers and policymakers to track the improvement or decline in local regulatory conditions and provide a context for thinking about policy reform.


Increase economic well-being

The measures can help contribute to the understanding of which regulatory environments can produce the best economic outcomes for the largest pay my amazon credit card of people.

decorative icon of 10-pointed star made from interconnected circles


How is the data categorized?

This report collects data on 111 variables within the following six categories:

decorative icon


Explore the data sets

The Doing Business North America team collected data on 111 different regulatory and economic variables across six different categories. The data collected came entirely from official and publicly-available sources.

world map highlighting north america

View 2021 Report

Источник: https://dbna.asu.edu/

North America States 2021

Whether you're new to North America or you've been here for years, it's critical to know all 50 states that make up the United States. Each state is different from the last and varies in size and population. To understand them fully, here are the North American states.

Alabama

Alabama is one of the states in the southern region. The capital of the state is Montgomery, and it has 67 counties.

Alaska

Alaska is one of the lone states near Canada but is still part of the United States. The capital of the state is Juneau, and it has 27 counties.

Arizona

Arizona is one of the states in the southeast region. The capital of the state is Phoenix, and it has 15 counties.

Arkansas

Arkansas is one of the states in the Mid-South. The capital of the state is Little Rock, and it has 75 counties.

California

California is one of the largest states in the country. The capital of the state is Sacramento, and it has 58 counties.

Colorado

Colorado is one of the western states. The capital of the state is Denver, and it has 63 counties.

Connecticut

Connecticut is one of the northeastern states. The capital of the state is Hartford, and it only has 8 counties.

Delaware

Delaware is one of the smaller northeastern states. The capital of the state is Dover, and it has only 3 counties.

Florida

Florida is one of the most notable southeastern states. The capital of the state is Tallahassee, and it has 67 counties.

Georgia

Georgia is another state that's part of the south. The capital of the state is Atlanta, and it has 159 counties.

Hawaii

Hawaii is the second lone state and is located west of California. The capital of the state is Honolulu, and it has 67 counties.

Idaho

Idaho is one of the central states located in the northwest. The capital of the state is Boise, and it has 44 counties.

Illinois

Illinois is another notable northern state. The capital of the state is Springfield, and it has 102 counties.

Indiana

Indiana is how to sign up for north texas giving day northern state that borders states like Illinois and Iowa. The capital of the state is Indianapolis, and it has 92 counties.

Iowa

Iowa is a northern state that borders states like Illinois and Minnesota. The capital of the state is Des Moines, and it has 99 counties.

Kansas

Kansas is a midwestern state that borders states like Colorado and Missouri. The capital of the state is Topeka, and it has 105 counties.

Kentucky

Kentucky is one of the southern states that border Tennessee and Virginia, just to name a few. The capital of the state is Frankford, and it has 120 counties.

Louisiana

Louisiana is one of the states located deep in the south and borders states like Texas and Mississippi. The capital of the state is Baton Rouge, and it has 64 counties.

Maine

Maine is a state in the northeastern part of the United States. The capital of the state is Augusta, and it has 16 counties.

Maryland

Maryland is one of the northeastern states that borders Pennsylvania and Delaware. The capital of the state is Annapolis, and it has 23 counties.

Massachusetts

Massachusetts is one of the well-known northeastern states that borders Connecticut and New York. The capital of the state is Boston, and it has 14 counties.

Michigan

Michigan is a northern state that borders states like Illinois and Indiana. The capital of the state is Lansing, and it has 83 countries.

Minnesota

Minnesota is a northern state that borders states like Iowa and Usaa car insurance service number. The capital of the state is St. Paul, and it has 87 counties.

Mississippi

Mississippi is a southern state that borders states like Tennessee and Alabama. The capital of the state is Jackson, and it has 82 counties.

Missouri

Missouri is a mid-southern state that borders states like Illinois and Arkansas. The capital of the state is Jefferson City, and it has 114 counties.

Montana

Montana is a northern state that borders states like Idaho and Colorado. The capital of the state is Helena, and it has 56 counties.

Nebraska

Nebraska is a northern state that borders states like Colorado and Kansas. The capital of the state is Lincoln, and it has 93 counties.

Nevada

Nevada is a western state that borders states like California and Arizona. The capital of the state is Carson City, and it has 17 counties.

New Hampshire

New Hampshire is a smaller northeastern state that borders states like Maine and Massachusetts. The capital of the state is Concord, and it has 10 counties.

New Jersey

New Jersey is a northeastern state that orders states like Delaware and New York. The capital of the state is Trenton, and it has 21 counties.

New Mexico

New Mexico is a southwestern state that borders states like Arizona and Colorado. The capital of the state is Santa Fe, and it has 33 counties.

New York

New York is a well-known northeastern state that borders states like Connecticut and New Jersey. The capital of the state is Albany, and it has 62 counties.

North Carolina

North Carolina is an eastern state that borders states like Georgia and Tennessee. The capital of the state is Raleigh, and it has 100 counties.

North Dakota

North Dakota is a northern state that borders states like South Dakota and Minnesota. The capital of the state is Bismarck, and it has 53 counties.

Ohio

Ohio is a midwestern state that borders states like Indiana and Kentucky. The capital of the state is Columbus, and it has 88 counties.

Oklahoma

Oklahoma is a southern state that borders states like Texas and New Mexico. The capital of the state is Oklahoma City, and it has 77 counties.

Oregon

Oregon is a western state that borders states like Washington and California. The capital of the state is Salem, and it has 36 counties.

Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania is a northeastern state that borders states like New York and New Jersey. The capital of the state is Harrisburg, and it has 67 counties.

Rhode Island

Rhode Island is a smaller northeastern state that borders states like Connecticut as Massachusetts. The capital of the state is Providence, and it has 5 counties.

South Carolina

South Carolina is an eastern state that borders states like North Carolina and Georgia. The capital of the state is Columbia, and it has 46 counties.

South Dakota

Such Dakota is a northern state that borders states like North Dakota and Iowa. The capital of the state is Pierre, and it has 66 counties.

Tennessee

Tennessee is a mid-southern state that borders states like Arkansas and Kentucky. The capital of the state is Nashville, and it has 95 counties.

Texas

Texas is a large southern state that borders states like Oklahoma and Arkansas. The capital of the state is Austin, and it has 254 counties.

Utah

Utah is a western state that borders states like Arizona and Colorado. The capital of the state is Salt Lake City, and it has 29 counties.

Vermont

Vermont is a small northeastern state that borders States like Massachusetts and New Hampshire. The capital of the state is Montpelier, and it has 14 counties.

Virginia

Virginia is an eastern state that borders states like Kentucky and Maryland. The capital of the state is Richmond, and it has 95 counties.

Washington

Washington is a northwestern state that borders states like Oregon and Idaho. The capital of the state is Olympia, and it has 39 counties.

West Virginia

West Virginia is the eastern state that's just above Virginia. The capital of the state is Capital one venture credit increase, and it has 55 counties.

Wisconsin

Wisconsin is the northern state that borders states like Iowa and Michigan. The capital of the state is Madison, and it has 72 counties.

Wyoming

Wyoming is the western state that borders states like Montana and Nebraska. The capital of the state is Cheyenne, and it has 23 counties.

Источник: https://worldpopulationreview.com/country-rankings/north-america-states

5 Replies to “North america states”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *