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How to Sell Your Baseball Cards

We buy baseball cards from 1969 and older.*

* We can buy most 1970s sports cards, especially if they are part of a larger vintage sports card collection.

* Besides some complete sets, we rarely buy cards newer than 1980, as many do not hold enough value.

While Dean's Cards specializes in vintage baseball cards, we also buy and sell vintage football cards, basketball cards, hockey cards, and non-sports cards and sets. This information applies to all vintage sports and non-sports cards, even if our examples largely relate to baseball cards.

Whether you built your sports cards collection yourself, inherited it from a relative, or even stumbled upon a box of old baseball cards in an attic, selling vintage sports cards should not be taken lightly because they are a fascinating piece of American History and often hold sentimental value.  If considering selling your cards, you must first determine if they have value.  Then you must decide on a way to get the best return for not only the cards but also your time and effort.


How to Determine if Your Baseball Cards Have Value

Value can be oversimplified to two components: the rarity of the card and the popularity of the player depicted on the card.  The most important factors affecting rarity are (1) the year the baseball card was printed, (2) the card manufacturer and how many were produced, and (3) the baseball card's condition, or how new it looks.

These considerations make the value extremely situational, which is why asking about the value of a card will almost always initially warrant the answer: “it depends.”  For instance, a baseball card featuring a popular player may be worthless if easy to find (this is the case for most modern cards), and baseball cards normally bringing in a fair amount of cash might be worthless if in bad shape.  All these reasons make valuing vintage sports cards a meticulous process, so we’ll break this down it down step by step.

As an interesting side note, the most valuable baseball card by far is the famously rare T206 Honus Wagner (1909-1911) with only about 60 known examples. A T206 Honus Wagner baseball card recently sold for over $3 million, setting the record for the most expensive card. While this card is so rare that very few people have ever held one in their hand, here are a few of the valuable cards that actually turn up at Dean's Cards:

To learn about how much money you can expect to receive for your sports card collection, read more here: How Much Money to Expect When Selling My Baseball Cards?


STEP 1:  Identify the Baseball Cards in Your Collection

Before you can even begin to pin a value to your collection, identifying what you are working with is a crucial first step.  Trying to sell cards without knowing any details will either get you nowhere or warrant a low offer, as buyers take a risk when bidding on the unknown.  The more you know about your cards the better.

How to Determine the Print Year

The best place to start when determining the value of your cards is to identify what year they were printed.  The earliest baseball cards were produced in the late 1800s, with sizable batches first printed in 1909 and the first legitimate set rolling out in 1948.  The cards holding the greatest value are typically from the 1960s, 1950s, and older. 

The easiest way to find out what year(s) your cards are from is by examining the information on the back of the card, such as by looking at the last year of reported statistics.  The stats usually provide information from a few consecutive seasons, but pay attention to the last year, i.e., the most recent year before production of the card.  For example, if you have a card that lists batting statistics from 1962, 1963, and 1964 – you can conclude that the card is from 1965, as the card was printed after the conclusion of the 1964 season but before the 1965 season.  In addition, some trading cards list the year in which the copyright was established at the very bottom on the back, which isn't the case with this example.  The copyright can also be used to identify the manufacturer, but we will get to that a little later.

Some older cards do not list off yearly statistics on the back (such as the card in the example below), so another simple way to determine the year a card was printed is to conduct a simple online search. Look for the player's name as well as the card number (turn the card to its backside and look in the upper right or left-hand corner).  Type this information into a Google search as shown below.  The search results should disclose the year and manufacturer, but we also recommend looking at the image results to make sure you identified the correct card.

The "Four Eras" of Baseball Cards

Baseball cards are generally classified into four eras.  Although the exact definitions of these eras may vary from expert to expert, you will find the Dean’s Cards parameters consistent with almost any other source of knowledge.  Since the year of a card heavily influences value, cards from certain eras are treated differently and you should adjust your expectations for financial return accordingly.  Click on these links to read more about the era, or eras, in which your cards fall.

Dean’s Cards does not buy cards newer than 1980. However, some hold value. To read more, please click the link above.

Find the Manufacturer

Who printed your cards is important, as cards from the same year that are printed by different manufacturers can be valued very differently.  While the baseball card market is currently dominated by Topps (companies such as Panini print cards for other sports), various companies released sets of their own over the years.  Brands dominating the Pre-War baseball card era include Goudey and the many different tobacco, chocolate, or candy companies who included cards with their products.  Dean wrote a book covering many of these sets titled Before There Was Bubble Gum: Our Favorite Pre-World War I Baseball Cards.

Bowman came onto the scene in 1948 with the first post-war set, only to be challenged by the Topps Chewing Gum Company (known today as simply Topps) once they released their first set in 1952.  Topps and Bowman battled it out until Topps purchased Bowman after the 1955 season.  If interested in this fascinating story, check out Dean’s second book, The Bubble Gum Card War: The Great Bowman & Topps Sets from 1948 to 1955.  After the 1950s, few challenged Topps until the 1980s when the baseball card scene exploded, leading to hundreds of different sets and an oversaturated market.  Read more about this on the page about modern cards linked in the section above.

To determine the manufacturer, flip a card over to the back and look for the copyright (the same way we look for clues to indicate a card's print year.)  The copyright should say the company name, such as T.C.G. (Topps Chewing Gum).

Classify Your Baseball Cards by Set

Before submitting an appraisal form to Dean’s Cards, or trying to sell your vintage baseball cards in general, separate your cards by year and by set.  Topps printed baseball card sets, football card sets, basketball card sets, and hockey card sets, which all vary in value.  For example, your collection may consist of 1952 Topps Baseball Cards, 1953 Bowman Baseball Cards, 1953 Bowman Football Cards, and 1957 Topps Baseball Cards.  Knowing how many sports cards you have from each separate set is important.

Trading cards are generally released in sets.  Set sizes range over the years, but your typical vintage baseball card set consists of somewhere between 400-600 cards.  In the hobby, sets are used to classify and value sports cards, as cards are sold individually or in complete sets.  Due to our exclusive buying software, developed in-house, Dean’s Cards evaluates collections on a card-by-card basis, resulting in a more accurate offer.

Sometimes manufacturers release multiple types of sets in the same year.  For example, in 1964 Topps released the ‘Topps Giants’ baseball card set, that featured over-sized cards.  This was a special set that was issued in addition to the regular 1964 Topps baseball cards.  

Another famous example is Topps Traded, first issued as inserts and included in the wax packs of 1974 and 1976 Topps These insert sets featured players who were traded mid-season in their new uniforms.  Today, Topps has expanded the idea to exclude rookies and issues an Update set towards the end of the season.

The cards in these secondary sets often look somewhat similar to those in their corresponding main sets, but the designs are noticeably different.  If you have trouble identifying cards in your collection, keep in mind that you may be looking at items from one of these various obscure sets printed over the years.  This does not mean these cards are not worth anything, but they are valued completely differently than the mainstream sets.

Beyond Baseball – Other Trading Cards

Of the cards printed before 1970, about 80% were baseball cards.  However, we also buy and sell Football cards, Basketball cards, Hockey cards, and Non-Sports cards, all popular in their own right.  If your collection consists of cards for multiple sports, separate these and count how many you have of each.

Click the following links to find out more about selling a specific type of sports card other than baseball:

Non-sports cards can be hard to identify, as many obscure sets were produced with a wide range of themes.  However, searching the card name and number will most likely help you identify these sets.  Some of the most sought-after Non-Sports Sets in the hobby include 1938 Horrors of War, 1956 Davy Crockett (based on scenes in the motion picture) with Orange or Green back, 1962 Mars Attacks, 1962 Civil War News, and 1977 Star Wars.


STEP 2:  Consider Player Popularity and Rarity

The player(s) depicted on a card can make or break value.  Especially as Topps increased their set sizes throughout the 60s and 70s, players did not have to be good or popular to get on a card.  Most cards in each set depict entirely ordinary players, even some of who went on to barely play in the major leagues.  This is what makes finding a great player so much fun, whether in a wax pack in 1957 or in a shoebox today.  If Topps only printed cards of the best players then kids would not have experienced the excitement of ripping open packs of cards, hoping to find a gem. 

Star Cards

Baseball Cards with containing the image of the game's stars, and especially players who eventually were inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame, have more value than the cards featuring common players.  Rookie cards for Hall-of-Famers are typically the most valuable baseball cards in a given set.  

The sports cards featuring the ordinary (non-star) players are referred to as ‘commons’.  While cards depicting Hall of Fame players are almost always more valuable than the common cards in the set,  there are dozens of Hall-of-Famers in each vintage sports card set.

Pulling aside the star players is a good start to evaluating your collection, as they are the most important cards to value.  When placing a bid on a collection, Dean’s Cards focuses on these items since they make or break the final offer.  If you do not know a lot about baseball this step may be difficult, but you can use our website as a reference to find the Hall of Fame players for each set.  Products featuring these players are labeled HALL-OF-FAME in the Dean’s Cards inventory.  You can check the ‘Hall of Fame’ box at the top of a page for a certain year to only see products labeled as such.  This applies to cards of all sports, not just baseball.

Vintage baseball cards featuring future Hall-of-Fame players, such as Lou Gehrig, Babe Ruth, Cy Young, Ty Cobb, Mickey Mantle, Hank Aaron, Roberto Clemente, Stan Musial, Willie Mays, Nolan Ryan, and Ted Williams will almost always have some sort of value, even when found in below average conditions.  The same goes for Vintage Football Cards features Hall-of-Famers, such as Joe Namath, Jim Brown, Bart Starr, Walter Payton, Gale Sayers, Fred Biletnikoff, and Johnny Unitas.  As for Basketball cards and Hockey cards, depicting Hall-of-Fame players such as Wilt Chamberlain, Michael Jordan, Bill Russell, Jerry West, Gordie Howe, Wayne Gretzky, and Bobby Orr have seen their value increase over the years.  These are just a few well-known examples out of hundreds.

Rookie Cards

A player’s rookie card is their first ever card, sometimes printed before their first professional season.  One notable varation to this rule is the 1952 Topps Mickey Mantle, which is considered as his Topps rookie card even though ‘The Mick’ was first pictured in 1951 Bowman.  Both cards are some of the most valuable in the hobby, but the 1952 Topps version is worth much more since it is Mantle’s first appearance in a Topps set and was short-printed.  As noted above, rookie cards of Hall-of-Fame players are generally the most valuable in a set.  Other popular rookie baseball cards include 1951 Bowman Willie Mays, 1954 Topps Hank Aaron, 1955 Topps Sandy Koufax, and 1963 Topps Pete Rose.  Although not quite as electric as baseball rookies, popular examples from other sports include 1957 Topps Johnny Unitas, 1986-1987 Fleer Michael Jordan, 1969-1970 Topps Lew Alcindor (Kareem Abdul-Jabbar), and 1979-1980 O-Pee-Chee Wayne Gretzky.

Rare Cards - Short Prints and Variations

While not necessarily relating to player popularity, short-printed cards (fewer were printed than the rest of the set) and variations cards can be some of the most valuable in a set.  One of the most famous short-printed baseball cards is the 1954 Bowman #66 Ted Williams, as Bowman was forced to pull Williams off the set early into production when it was discovered that the slugger signed an exclusive contract with Topps.  The slot on the print sheet for card #66 was replaced by Jimmy Piersall, who also had another card in the set, making the Williams variation of card #66 much rarer.  

More traditional instances of card variations involve a card being released with two different font colors or player images, one scarcer than the other.  A more interesting example is 1969 Topps #151 Clay Dalrymple.  The remarkably ordinary Dalrymple started the calendar year with the Phillies but was traded to the Orioles in January.  Topps initially printed card #151 with a picture of the catcher in a Phillies uniform.  Topps quickly corrected the mistake, substituting in a hatless headshot of Dalrymple (with no Phillies logo visible) and changing the team name to the Orioles.  The latter variation was printed in larger numbers and is considered the 'common variation’ of card #151, while the Phillies version is the ‘rare variation’.

1952 Topps Mickey MantleA beautiful example of the 1952 Topps Mickey Mantle (image courtesy of Goodwin & Co.)

STEP 3:  Evaluate the Condition of Your Vintage Sports Cards

Condition is probably the single biggest factor which affects the value of vintage cards.  Some sellers assume that all old cards must be extremely valuable no matter their condition; these folks are disappointed to receive underwhelming bids for beat up cards. 

Grading Vintage Cards

Professional Sports Authentication (PSA) is regarded as the grading expert in the hobby, and their grading scale rates cards from 1 (Poor) to 10 (Gem Mint).  At Dean’s Cards, we evaluate cards on the same scale but keep Near Mint/Mint (8) as our highest grade.  Deciphering whether a card is an 8, 9, or 10 can be highly subjective, as cards of these grades look nearly the same. 

Casual sellers are not at all expected to grade the cards in their collection, but obtaining a basic understanding of your collection's condition makes you a more educated seller and helps set realistic expectations for a return value.  Since today’s cards are printed on higher quality material and people take better care of them, modern cards are expected to be in nearly perfect shape so their condition is generally a nonfactor.  The exception to this generalization is valuable modern rookie cards, as the prices vary dramatically amongst professionally graded 8’s, 9’s, and 10’s.

Our Grading Scale

Our standards lie at the upper end of the hobby, for we are known as conservative graders.  We set our standards high to ensure that our customers receive the best and are never disappointed.  Our cards come with their grades stuck on the back-side of their sleeves, and full scans of EVERY single vintage card in the Dean’s Cards inventory are available to the public eye, so what you see is what you get.

For more information, check out this page dedicated entirely to this topic:Dean’s Detailed Guide and Standards on Grading Sports Cards

Should I Have My Sports Cards Professionally Graded?

Many people looking to sell their collections are told that getting their cards professionally graded makes them more valuable.  While this is sometimes true for rare and expensive cards, sending a bunch of mid-grade common cards (featuring ordinary players) to PSA is not worth the expense.  With the expensive shipping and insurance fees the cost is routinely $14 - $17 per common card, and much more for stars.  At Dean’s Cards, we do not usually advise getting a card graded unless it is old, in great condition, or a star card (depending on the year).  We often see people that inherited collections spend far more on grading fees than the collection is actually worth.  The key is knowing which cards to submit for grading.  Dean says that if a card has a high value it's because of the card, not the graded case it's in!  Usually, the safer and more profitable move is to sell your cards ungraded.

For more information, check out this page dedicated entirely to this topic:Should I Get My Baseball Cards Graded by PSA?


Now that you’ve valued your collection, you can accurately assess if you’re willing to part with your cards based on the estimated return.  As Dean always says, the bottom line is that this is your collection and you do not have to sell it, especially if you are still emotionally attached.  If you have not looked at your cards in years then it may make sense to sell them and use the money for something useful.  Many collectors never sell their collections until there is a special event which encourages them to do so, such as a wedding, sending a kid to college, or paying off bills.  However, it is often the family members who inherited the cards which end up selling them.

What if I am Just Not Ready to Let Go?

If you are not to the point where you can emotionally part with your boyhood memories then my advice is not to sell.  Especially if you do not have any ideas for how to use the money, as you would probably be better off letting your cards continue to accrue value over time rather than putting your returns in a savings account with almost no interest.  Many collectors keep the cards until they die and let their heirs worry about what to do with the collection.  We certainly understand a man’s attachment to a boyhood sports card collection.

That being said, refusing to sell your collection simply because you’re banking on their value increasing is not necessarily a safe bet.  After all, that is what everyone said about internet stock a few years ago and we all know how that played out. 

For more information, check out this page dedicated entirely to this topic:When NOT to Sell Your Baseball Card Collection

Where and How Should I Sell My Old Baseball Cards?

After deciding you want to sell your collection, the process is not over.  You must decide where and how, as this is ultimately the most important part.  Trying to sell them on your own requires hours and hours of work, and does not guarantee you sell them at all.  The most painless way to sell your collection is through Dean’s Cards. We make the process quick and offer much more than other vendors.  However, not all cards fall within our specific interest. In that case, there are alternatives to selling to Dean’s Cards but require more effort with the risk of being ripped off. Dealers and vendors often give lowball offers on collections when they are unsure of the current market value. This is never the case when selling to Dean’s Cards, as our purchasing software generates a fair price based on what each item sells for. This eliminates the need for negotiation and haggling which was commonplace in pre-internet card transactions.

Selling to the Local Sports Card Shop

People used to ask why they shouldn’t sell their cards to the local sports card store.  Today, most of these shops are gone, due to efficiency. cost-effectiveness and ease of buying baseball cards online.  This article written by Dean around 2003 is still interesting: Should I Sell My Baseball Cards to the Neighborhood Card Store?

Should I Sell My Sports Cards Myself on eBay?

Many people wonder why they shouldn’t sell their cards themselves on eBay, and the answer is quite simple: it’s not nearly as easy as you might imagine.  Many of the card sellers on eBay are actual professionals, or at least part-time, who have dedicated years to mastering the online marketplace.  A few years ago, Dean made a list of the 21 steps Dean’s Cards takes to buy and sell a single baseball card.  Our procedures have changed since then, but this list (available in the ‘Selling Your Baseball Cards on eBay’ link) provides a good idea for the large workload of selling cards online.

Selling your cards on eBay can bring you a higher return through diligent work, but this is not always the case.  First-time sellers on eBay are not able to get a large return as it takes years to slowly build up enough credibility and feedback to sell for top prices.  Even experienced amateur eBay sellers cannot sell for the prices that Dean’s Cards can.  Also, keep in mind that our revenues because of the added value of convenience, selection, security and customer service that we can provide with our professional staff and award-winning website.  Dean's Cards has an 8,500 square foot office, an inventory of over one million cards, and a website running numerous custom-made and technologically advanced programs.  Our tough grading, quality insurance, and great service make this worthwhile, but it’s taken Dean decades to perfect the process.

All in all, we may encourage some sellers to turn to eBay if they are both knowledgeable about vintage cards and e-commerce, but generally, we say that Dean’s Cards will take care of you best.  You can count on us to offer you our best price upfront when we bid on your sports card collection.  We do everything we can to eliminate the hassles, confusion, and stress of selling a baseball card collection.

For more information, check out this page dedicated entirely to this topic:Selling Your Baseball Cards on eBay


The bottom line is that Dean's Cards sells thousands of cards every week. This means WE ALWAYS NEED CARDS and pay "top dollar" for collections. Based on the customer feedback that we receive, we pay more for cards than other dealers. We would appreciate the opportunity to bid on your collection (click here to see the seller testimonials for yourself).

Back in the day, selling at cards shows or card shops was a hassle, as you often had to drive several hours with your collection only to end up negotiating with dealers without a clear idea of what they need.  Dean's Cards keeps the process simple and straight forward.  You mail us your collection, our custom-made bid software generates an offer based on current market prices and availability, and we send you our best offer up front.  If you don't like our offer we will send it back, but sellers end up accepting our bid over 80% of time.

We do everything we can to eliminate the hassles, confusion, and stress of selling a baseball card collection.  Since purchasing private collections of vintage sports cards is our primary source of inventory replenishment, we take all steps necessary to make sure that every client that decides to sell their collection to us feels as though they have been treated fairly.

For details on the process and regarding what cards we are looking for, click on the 'Selling Your Baseball Cards to Dean' link below this paragraph.  After reading this page, if you have further questions or concerns regarding the sale of your vintage sports card collection, please do not hesitate to contact us.  A member of our Purchasing Department (click here to meet the buying team) would be happy to address your questions and concerns.  Please send an email to [email protected], or give us a call at (513) 898-0651.

For more information, check out this page dedicated entirely to this topic:Selling Your Baseball Cards to Dean's Cards

Источник: https://www.deanscards.com/sell-your-baseball-cards

Trading card

Picture cards that are collectable

Not to be confused with Trade card.

A trading card (or collectible card) is a small card, usually made out of paperboard or thick paper, which usually contains an image of a certain person, place or thing (fictional or real) and a short description of the picture, along with other text (attacks, statistics, or trivia).[1] There is a wide variation of different types of cards.

Trading cards are traditionally associated with sports; baseball cards are particularly common, but can also include subjects such as Pokémon and other non-sports trading cards. These often feature cartoons, comic book characters, television series and film stills. In the 1990s, cards designed specifically for playing games became popular enough to develop into a distinct category, collectible card games. These games are mostly fantasy-based gameplay. Fantasy art cards are a subgenre of trading cards that focus on the artwork.

History[edit]

Origins[edit]

Main articles: Trade card and Cigarette card

Trade cards are the ancestors of trading cards. Some of the earliest prizes found in retail products were cigarette cards—trade cards advertising the product (not to be confused with trading cards) that were inserted into paper packs of cigarettes as stiffeners to protect the contents.[2]Allen and Ginter in the U.S. in 1886, and British company W.D. & H.O. Wills in 1888, were the first tobacco companies to print advertisements.[3] A couple years later, lithograph pictures on the cards with an encyclopedic variety of topics from nature to war to sports — subjects that appealed to men who smoked - began to surface as well.[4] By 1900, there were thousands of tobacco card sets manufactured by 300 different companies. Children would stand outside of stores to ask customers who bought cigarettes for the promotional cards.[5] Following the success of cigarette cards, trade cards were produced by manufacturers of other products and included in the product or handed to the customer by the store clerk at the time of purchase.[4] World War II put an end to cigarette card production due to limited paper resources, and after the war cigarette cards never really made a comeback. After that collectors of prizes from retail products took to collecting tea cards in the UK and bubble gum cards in the US.[6]

Early baseball cards[edit]

Main article: Baseball card

The first baseball cards were trade cards printed in the late 1860s by a sporting goods company, around the time baseball became a professional sport.[7] Most of the baseball cards around the beginning of the 20th century came in candy and tobacco products. It was during this era that the most valuable baseball card ever printed was produced - the T206 tobacco card featuring Honus Wagner.[8] The T206 Set, distributed by the American Tobacco Company in 1909, is considered by collectors to be the most popular set of all time.[9] In 1933, Goudey Gum Company of Boston issued baseball cards with players biographies on the backs and was the first to put baseball cards in bubble gum.[10] The 1933 Goudey set remains one of the most popular and affordable vintage sets to this day.[11]Bowman Gum of Philadelphia issued its first baseball cards in 1948.

Modern trading cards[edit]

Topps Chewing Gum, Inc., now known as "The Topps Company, Inc.", started inserting trading cards into bubble gum packs in 1950 with such topics as TV and film cowboy Hopalong Cassidy; "Bring 'Em Back Alive" cards featuring Frank Buck on big game hunts in Africa; and All-American Football Cards. Topps produced its first baseball trading card set in 1951, with the resulting design resembling that of playing cards.[12] Topps owner and founder Sy Berger created the first true modern baseball card set, complete with playing record and statistics, the following year in the form of 1952 Topps Baseball.[13] This is one of the most popular sets of all time; its most valued piece was 1952 Topps Mickey Mantle #311, which is sometimes erroneously referred to as Mantle's rookie card, though he had in fact appeared in the 1951 Bowman Baseball set.[14]

Topps purchased their chief competitor, Bowman Gum, in 1956.[15] Topps was the leader in the trading card industry from 1956 to 1980, not only in sports cards but in entertainment cards as well. Many of the top selling non-sports cards were produced by Topps, including Wacky Packages (1967, 1973–1977), Star Wars (beginning in 1977)[16] and Garbage Pail Kids (beginning in 1985).[17] Topps inserted baseball cards as prizes into packs of gum until 1981, when cards were sold without the gum. Collectors were delighted, since the oil from the gum was ruining an otherwise pristine or valuable card.[18]

Digital trading cards[edit]

In an attempt to stay current with technology and digital trends, existing and new trading card companies started to create digital trading cards that lived exclusively online or as a digital counterpart of a physical card.

In 1995 Michael A. Pace produced "computer based" trading cards, utilizing a CD ROM computer system and floppy discs.[19]

In 2000, Topps launched a brand of sports cards, called etopps. These cards were sold exclusively online through individual IPO's (initial player offering) in which the card is offered for usually a week at the IPO price. That same year, Tokenzone launched a digital collectibles platform that was used by media companies to distribute content in the form of digital trading cards. The quantity sold depended on how many people offered to buy but was limited to a certain maximum. After a sale, the cards were held in a climate-controlled warehouse unless the buyer requests delivery, and the cards could be traded online without changing hands except in the virtual sense. In January 2012, Topps announced that they would be discontinuing their eTopps product line.[20]

Digital collectible card games were estimated to be a $1.3B market in 2013.[21] A number of tech start-ups have attempted to establish themselves in this space, notably Stampii (Spain, 2009),[22][23] Fantom (Ireland, 2011), Deckdaq (Israel, 2011), and 2Stic (Austria, 2013).

Panini launched their Adrenalyn XL platform with an NBA and NFL trading card collection. Connect2Media together with Winning Moves, created an iPhone Application to host a series of trading card collections, including Dinosaurs, James Bond - 007, Celebs, Gum Ball 3000, European Football Stars and NBA. In 2011, mytcg Technologies launched a platform that enabled content holders to host their content on.

On July 1, 2011, Wildcat Intellectual Property Holdings filed a lawsuit against 12 defendants, including Topps, Panini, Sony, Electronic Arts, Konami, Pokémon, Zynga and Nintendo, for allegedly infringing Wildcat's "Electronic Trading Card" patent.[24]

In 2012, Topps also launched their first phone application. Topps Bunt was an app that allowed users to connect with other fans in a fantasy league type game environment wherein they can collect their favorite players, earn points based on how well they play and trade and compete with other fans. Three years later, the same company launched a digital experiment in Europe (geotargeted to exclude the USA) with its Marvel Hero Attax, using digital as an overlay to its physical product.[25]

Value[edit]

Today, the development of the Internet has given rise to various online communities, through which members can trade collectible cards with each other. Cards are often bought and sold via eBay and other online retail sources. Many websites solicit their own "sell to us" page in hopes to draw in more purchase opportunities.[26]

The value of a trading card depends on a combination of the card's condition, the subject's popularity and the scarcity of the card. In some cases, especially with older cards that preceded the advent of card collecting as a widespread hobby, they have become collectors' items of considerable value. In recent years, many sports cards have not necessarily appreciated as much in value due to overproduction, although some manufacturers have used limited editions and smaller print runs to boost value. Trading cards, however, do not have an absolute monetary value. Cards are only worth as much as a collector is willing to pay.[27]

Condition[edit]

Card condition is one aspect of trading cards that determine the value of a card. There are four areas of interest in determining a card's condition. Centering, corners, edges and surface are taken into consideration, for imperfections, such as color spots and blurred images, and wear, such as creases, scratches and tears, when determining a trading card's value.[28] Cards are considered poor to pristine based on their condition, or in some cases rated 1 through 10.[29] A card in pristine condition, for example, will generally be valued higher than a card in poor condition.

Condition Description
Pristine Perfect card. No imperfections or damage to the naked eye and upon close inspection.
Mint condition No printing imperfections or damage to the naked eye. Very minor printing imperfections or damage upon close inspection. Clean gloss with one or two scratches.
Near Mint/Mint No printing imperfections or damage to the naked eye, but slight printing imperfections or damage upon close inspection. Solid gloss with very minor scratches.
Near Mint Noticeable, but minor, imperfections or wear on the card. Solid gloss with very minor scratches.
Excellent/Near Mint Noticeable, but minor, imperfections or wear on the card. Mostly solid gloss with minor scratches.
Excellent Noticeable imperfections or moderate wear on the card. Some gloss lost with minor scratches.
Very Good/Excellent Noticeable imperfections or moderate wear on the card. Heavy gloss lost with very minor scuffing, and an extremely subtle tear.
Very Good Heavy imperfections or heavy wear on the card. Almost no gloss. Minor scuffing or very minor tear.
Good Severe imperfections or wear on the card. No gloss. Noticeable scuffing or tear.
Poor Destructive imperfections or wear on the card. No gloss. Heavy scuffing, severe tear or heavy creases.

Popularity[edit]

Popularity of trading cards is determined by the subject represented on the card, their real life accomplishments, and short term news coverage as well as the specifics of the card.[27]

Scarcity[edit]

While vintage cards are truly a scarce commodity, modern-day manufacturers have to artificially add value to their products in order to make them scarce. This is accomplished by including serial-numbered parallel sets, cards with game-worn memorabilia, autographs, and more. Time can also make cards more scarce due to the fact that cards may be lost or destroyed.[8]

Catalogs[edit]

Trading card catalogs are available both online and offline for enthusiast.[30] They are mainly used as an educational tool and to identify cards. Online catalogs also contain additional resources for collection management and communication between collectors.

Terminology[edit]

Phrase Definition
9-pocket pageA plastic sheet used to store and protect up card in nine card slots, and then stored in a card binder
9-Up Sheet Uncut sheets of nine cards, usually promos.
Autograph Card Printed insert cards that also bear an original cast or artist signature.
Base Set Complete sets of base cards for a particular card series.
BinderA binder used to store cards using 9-card page holders.
Break An online service where someone (usually for the exchange of currency) opens packages of trading cards and sends them to the buyer. Breaks have "spots" for sale, typically sorted by team.
Blaster Box A factory sealed box with typically 6 to 12 packs of cards. Typically made for sale at large retail stores such as Walmart and Target.
Box Original manufacturer's containers of multiple packs, often 24 to 36 packs per box.
Box Topper Card Cards included in a factory sealed box.
Blister Pack Factory plastic bubble packs of cards or packs, for retail peg-hanger sales.
Card sleeveSleeves that cards are to be put in to protect the cards.
Cartophily Hobby of collecting trading cards, mostly cigarette cards.
Case Factory-sealed crates filled with card boxes, often six to twelve card boxes per case.
Chase Card Card, or cards, included as a bonus in a factory sealed case.
Common Card Non-rare cards that form the main set. Also known as base cards.
Factory Set Card sets, typically complete base sets, sorted and sold from the manufacturer.[27]
Hobby Card Items sold mainly to collectors, through stores that deal exclusively in collectible cards. Usually contains some items not included in the retail offerings.
Insert cardNon-rare to rare cards that are randomly inserted into packs, at various ratios (e.g. 1 card per 24 packs). An insert card is often different from the base set in appearance and numbering. Also known as chase cards.[31]
Master Set Not well defined; often a base set and all readily available insert sets; typically does not include promos, mail-in cards, sketch cards, or autograph cards.
Oversized Card Any base, common, insert, or other cards not of standard or widevision size.
Parallel Card A modified base card, which may contain extra foil stamping, hologram stamping that distinguishes the card from the base card.
Pack Original wrappers with base, and potentially insert, cards within, often called 'wax packs', typically with two to eight cards per pack. Today the packs are usually plastic or foil wrap.
Retail Card Cards, packs, boxes and cases sold to the public, typically via large retail stores, such as K-mart or Wal-Mart.
Rack Pack Factory pack of unwrapped cards, for retail peg-hanger sales.
Promo Card Cards that are distributed, typically in advance, by the manufacturer to promote upcoming products.
Redemption Card Insert cards found in packs that are mailed (posted) to the manufacturer for a special card or some other gift.
Sell Sheet Also 'ad slicks'. Usually one page, but increasingly fold-outs, distributed by the manufacturers to card distributors, in advance, to promote upcoming products. With the proliferation of the Internet, sell sheets are now typically distributed in digital form to trading card media outlets such as Beckett and The Cardboard Connection so that collectors can preview sets months before they are released.[32]
SinglesIndividual cards sold at hobby or online stores.
Sketch Card Insert cards that feature near-one-of-a-kind artists sketches.
Swatch Insert cards that feature a mounted swatch of cloth, such as from a sports player's jersey or an actor's costume.
Tin Factory metal cans, typically filled with cards or packs, often with inserts.
Top LoaderA hard plastic sleeve used to store a single card to prevent scratches, corner damage and other blemishes.
Unreleased Card Cards printed by the manufacturer, but not officially distributed for a variety of reasons. Often leaked to the public, sometimes improperly. Not to be confused with promo cards.
Uncut Sheet Sheets of uncut base, insert, promo, or other cards.
Wrapper Original pack covers, often with collectible variations.

Sports cards[edit]

Sports card is a generic term for a trading card with a sports-related subject, as opposed to non-sports trading cards that deal with other topics. Sports cards were among the earliest forms of collectibles. They typically consist of a picture of a player on one side, with statistics or other information on the reverse. Cards have been produced featuring most major sports, especially those played in North America, including, but not limited to, American football, association football (soccer), baseball, basketball, boxing, golf, ice hockey, racing and tennis.

The first set with a sporting theme appeared in 1896, a cricket series by W.D. & H.O. Wills of 50 cricketers. The tobacco companies soon realised that sports cards were a great way to obtain brand loyalty. In 1896 the first association football set, "Footballers & Club Colours", was published by Marcus & Company, a small firm in Manchester. Other football sets issued at that time were "Footballers & Club Colours" (Kinner, 1898); "Footballers" (J. F. Bell, 1902); "Footballers" (F. J. Smith, 1902) and "Footballers" (Percy E. Cadle, 1904).[33]

The first stage in the development of sports cards, during the second half of the 19th century, is essentially the story of baseball cards, since baseball was the first sport to become widely professionalized. Hockey cards also began to appear early in the 20th century. Cards from this period are commonly known as cigarette cards or tobacco cards, because many were produced by tobacco companies and inserted into cigarette packages, to stiffen cigarette packaging and advertise cigarette brands. The most expensive card in the hobby is a cigarette card of Honus Wagner in a set called 1909 T-206. The story told is that Wagner was against his cards being inserted into something that children would collect. So the production of his cards stopped abruptly. It is assumed that less than 100 of his cards exist in this set. The 1909 T-206 Honus Wagner card has sold for as much as $2.8 million.[34]

Sets of cards are issued with each season for major professional sports. Since companies typically must pay players for the right to use their images, the vast majority of sports cards feature professional athletes. Amateurs appear only rarely, usually on cards produced or authorized by the institution they compete for, such as a college.

Many older sports cards (pre-1980) command a high price today; this is because they are hard to find, especially in good quality condition. This happened because many children used to place their cards in bicycle spokes, where the cards were easily damaged. Rookie cards of Hall of Fame sports stars can command thousands of dollars if they have been relatively well-preserved.

In the 1980s, sports cards started to get produced in higher numbers, and collectors started to keep their cards in better condition as they became increasingly aware of their potential investment value. This trend continued well into the 1990s. This practice caused many of the cards manufactured during this era to stay low in value, due to their high numbers.

The proliferation of cards saturated the market, and by the late 1990s, card companies began to produce scarcer versions of cards to keep many collectors interested. The latest trends in the hobby have been "game used memorabilia" cards, which usually feature a piece of a player's jersey worn in a real professional game; other memorabilia cards include pieces of bats, balls, hats, helmets, and floors. Authenticated autographs are also popular, as are "serially numbered" cards, which are produced in much smaller amounts than regular "base set cards".

Autographs obtained by card manufacturers have become the most collected baseball cards in the hobby's history. This started in 1990 in baseball when Upper Deck randomly inserted autographs of Reggie Jackson into boxes. They are commonly referred to as "Certified Autographed Inserts" or "CAI's". Both the athlete's and card company's reputations are on the line if they do not personally sign these cards. This has created the most authentic autographs in existence.[citation needed] These cards all have some form of printed statements that the autographs are authentic, this way, no matter who owns the autograph there is no question of its authenticity. CAI's have branched out into autographs of famous actors, musicians, Presidents, and even Albert Einstein. Mostly these autographs are cut from flat items such as postcards, index cards, and plain paper. Then they are pasted onto cards. In 2001, a company called Playoff started obtaining autographs on stickers that are stuck on the cards instead of them actually signing the cards. There is strong opposition against these types of autographs because the players never even saw the cards that the stickers were affixed to.[citation needed]

The competition among card companies to produce quality sports cards has been fierce. In 2005, the long-standing sports card producer Fleer went bankrupt and was bought out by Upper Deck. Not long after that, Donruss lost its MLB license. Currently, Topps is the official baseball card of the MLB.[citation needed]

[edit]

Main article: Association football trading card

Early association football card by Churchman, 1909

The first association football (or "soccer") cards were produced in 1898 by the Marcus & Company Tobacco in Manchester, England.[35] The set consisted of over 100 cards and was issued under the title of "Club Colours". They featured illustrated images of players on the front of the card, and a tobacco advertisement on the back of the card. Many other cigarette companies quickly created their own series, beginning with Kinner in 1898.[36] A later series of cards was produced in 1934 by Ardath, which was a 50-card set called Famous Footballers featuring images of players on the front of the card, and a tobacco advertisement and short biography of the player on the back of the card.

Modern association football trading cards were sold with bubble gum in the United Kingdom from 1958 to 1975 by A&BC, and later by Topps, UK from 1975 to 1981. Similar smaller sized cards were issued in Spain and Italy beginning in the late 1940s. Cards have been produced from 1981 to present, save 1985 and 1986.[37][38][39][40] Under its Merlin brand, since 1994 Topps has held the licence to produce stickers for the Premier Leaguesticker album.[41] Launched by Topps in the 2007–08 season, Match Attax, the official Premier League trading card game, is the best selling boys collectable in the UK – with around 1.5m collectors in the UK – and with global sales it is also the biggest selling sports trading card game in the world.[41][42]

Other variations of football products exist, such as marbles, cut-outs, coins, stamps and stickers, some made of light cardboard and attached with glue or stickers, into sticker albums specifically issued for the products. Forming a partnership with FIFA in 1970, Panini first produced a World Cup sticker album for the 1970 World Cup.[43][44] Initiating a craze for collecting and trading stickers, since then, it has become part of the World Cup experience, especially for the younger generation.[45][46]The Guardian states, “the tradition of swapping duplicate [World Cup] stickers was a playground fixture during the 1970s and 1980s.”[45] Panini begins assembling World Cup squads for their sticker album a few months before they are officially announced by each nation, which means surprise call ups often don’t feature in their album. A notable example of this was 17-year-old Brazilian striker Ronaldo who was called up for the Brazil squad for the 1994 FIFA World Cup.[47]

Panini’s football trading card game Adrenalyn XL was introduced in 2009. In 2010 Panini released a UEFA Champions League edition of Adrenalyn XL, containing 350 cards from 22 of the competing clubs, including defending champions FC Barcelona. The fourth edition of Panini FIFA 365 Adrenalyn XL was released for 2019, featuring top clubs, teams and players.[48]

[edit]

Main article: Australian rules football card

Australian rules football cards are almost exclusively found in Australia as no top-level leagues are present outside the country. The first Australian rules football cards were produced in conjunction with Goodwin & Co's Old Judge Cigarettes in the late 1880s.[49] In the set were Australian celebrities which included Australian rules footballers from Victoria and South Australia.[50] Other companies that issued earlier football cards were W.D. & H.O. Wills in 1905,[51] and Sniders & Abrahams (featuring scenes of matches in 1908 and then releasing other sets with portraits of football players in the 1910s, all in full color). In the 1930s, the Australian division of British Godfrey Phillips Co. released a set of football cards. By the same time, Hoadleys, a local confectionery company, released a set of illustrated cards. Another confectionery company, Clarke-Ellis, also released its own set of cards.[52] Other companies that launched cards sets in the 1930s were Pals Periodical, Plaistowe & Co., Carreras (two illustrated sets in 1933, the first of them with footballers caricatures by Bob Miram), Giant Licorice Cigarettes, MacRobertson's and W.D. & H.O. Wills, among others.[52] The most popular set of Australian rules football cards are often the considered to be the 1963 Scanlens card set. Select Australia is currently the longest continuously operating and largest producer of Australian rules football cards.[53] Prices for Australian rules football cards can be relatively high compared to other sporting codes in Australia. This is illustrated for both vintage and modern cards, such as an 1894 American Tobacco Company card featuring Essendon player Will Crebbin which sold for $10,110 in 2018 and a 2004 Select AFL Conquest Triple Brownlow Medallist signature card featuring Nathan Buckley, Adam Goodes and Mark Ricciuto which was valued at $3,000 in 2018.[54][55]

Baseball[edit]

Main article: Baseball card

Baseball cards will usually feature one or more baseball players or other baseball-related sports figures. The front of the card typically displays an image of the player with identifying information, including, but not limited to, the player's name and team affiliation. The reverse of most modern cards displays statistics and/or biographical information. Cards are most often found in the United States but are also common in countries such as Canada, Cuba, and Japan, where baseball is a popular sport and there are professional leagues.

The earliest baseball cards were in the form of trade cards produced in 1868.[56] They evolved into tobacco cards by 1886.[57][58] In the early 20th century other industries began printing their own version of baseball cards to promote their products, such as bakery/bread cards, caramel cards, dairy cards, game cards and publication cards. Between the 1930s and 1960s the cards developed into trading cards, becoming their own product. In 1957, Topps changed the dimensions of its cards slightly, to 2-1/2 inches by 3-1/2 inches, setting a standard that remains the basic format for most sports cards produced in the United States.[59]

Basketball[edit]

Main article: Basketball card

. Basketball player collection cards

Basketball cards feature one or more players of the NBA, NCAA, Olympic basketball, WNBA, WBL, or some other basketball-related theme. The first basketball cards were produced in 1910, in a series cataloged as "College Athlete Felts B-33". The complete series included ten different sports, with only 30 cards being associated with basketball. The cards were issued as a cigarette redemption premium by Egyptiene Cigarettes.[60] The number of cigarette packages needed to redeem for the tobacco cards is not known.

The next series of basketball cards were issued in 1911, in two separate series; "T6 College Series", measuring approximately 6" by 8", and "T51 College Series", measuring approximately 2" by 3". These series included a variety of sports, with only 4 cards being associated with basketball,[61] one card from the T6 series and three cards from the T51 series. Both series were produced in two variations, one variation reading "College Series", the other, "2nd Series". The cards were acquired in trade for fifteen Murad cigarette coupons. The offer expired June 30, 1911.[62]

Basketball cards were not seen again until 1932, when C.A. Briggs Chocolate issued a 31-card set containing multiple sports. In exchange for a completed set of cards, Briggs offered baseball equipment.[63] The number of basketball cards in the set is not known.

Boxing[edit]

One of the first boxing cards on record in "America's Greatest Boxing Cards" and encyclopedia and check-list of boxing cards, was of John C. Heenan issued by photographs Charles D. Fredericks in the 1860s. The first set of boxer cards was issued by Goodwin & Company in 1886. Other companies, including Duke and Sons and the Lorillard Tobacco Company, also issued boxing cards in this period.[64] American company Allen & Ginter issued several boxing cards in the "World Champions" series, among other sportsmen.[64]

After the World War II, other companies took over the manufacturing of boxing cards, such as Leaf (1948), Topps (1951) and Donruss.[64]

More recently, Upper Deck released several boxing series.[65]

Cricket[edit]

Cricket cards usually feature one or more players or a cricket-related theme. One of the first cricket collections was released by tobacco company W.D. & H.O. Wills in 1896. Other companies that released cricket collections were AustralianSniders & Abrahams in 1905,[66] and Capstan (a Wills brand) in 1909–10.[67] Alexander Boguslavsky Ltd. also released an illustrated sports collection (that included cricket) in 1925.[68]

In modern times, cricket cards have been produced by Futera (1993–98)[69] and Topps.

Cycling[edit]

Panini released collections of some of the most famous bicycle races in Europe, such as the Tour de France[70] and the Giro d'Italia.[71]

[edit]

Main article: American Football Card

A gridiron football card is a type of collectible trading card typically printed on paper stock or card stock that features one or more American football, Canadian Football League all or World League of American Football players or other related sports figures. These cards are most often found in the United States and Canada where the sport is popular.

Most football cards features National Football League players. There are also Canadian Football League and college football cards. Player cards normally list the player's statistics.

Golf[edit]

Golf cards will usually feature one or more golf players or a golf-related theme. Golf cards were first introduced in 1901 by Ogden.[72]

Horse racing[edit]

Horse racing cards will usually feature jockeys or an equestrian related theme.

Ice hockey[edit]

Main article: Hockey card

The first hockey cards were included in cigarette packages from 1910 to 1913. After World War I, only one more cigarette set was issued, during the 1924–25 season by Champ's Cigarettes. NHL player Billy Coutu's biography includes an example of one of the 40 cards issued at that time.

During the 1920s, some hockey cards were printed by food and candy companies, such as Paulin's Candy, Maple Crispette, Crescent, Holland Creameries and La Patrie.

Through 1941, O-Pee-Chee printed hockey cards, stopping production for World War II. Presumably, the 1941 involvement of the US in the war affected the hockey card market, since Canada had been in the war since 1939.

Hockey cards next appeared during 1951–52, issued by Shirriff Desserts, York Peanut Butter and Post Cereal. Toronto's Parkhurst Products Company began printing cards in 1951, followed by Brooklyn's Topps Chewing Gum in 1954–1955. O-Pee-Chee and Topps did not produce cards in 1955 or 1956, but returned for 1957–58. Shirriff also issued "hockey coins."

Lacrosse[edit]

Lacrosse cards will usually feature one or more lacrosse players or another lacrosse-related theme.

Netball[edit]

With the Suncorp Super Netball competition in Australia Tap'n'Play decided to enter the Netball trading card market. In 2018 they produced their first very basic release but in 2019 they have ramped it with a release full of colour and signature cards.

Racing[edit]

Racing cards consist of a card stock with stats and pictures on it. Sometimes it shows the car, sometimes it shows the driver's face, and sometimes both. It also shows the endorsing companies for the car.

In September 2020, it was announced[73] that Topps has signed an exclusive worldwide agreement to become the Official Sticker and Trading Card Licensee of Formula 1.

Rugby[edit]

Main article: Rugby card

Rugby cards will usually feature one or more Rugby football players or another rugby-related theme.

Surfing[edit]

In 1993 Futera trading card company produced its first surfing trading card release Hot Surf with a similar release following in 1994 and 1995. These are the only three surfing trading card release for the Australian market.

Upper Deck has also produced surfing trading cards as a part of its annual Goodwins champion release and World of Sport series.

Sumo[edit]

Sumo cards consist of sports card that features one or more sumo wrestlers (sumoists) or another sumo-related theme.

Tennis[edit]

From the early 1900s through to the 1980s several companies produced tennis trading cards as part of general sports card promotional release or exclusive tennis card release. One of these being W.A. & A.C. Churchman tobacco company Men of the Moment in sport release of 1936. They also produced an exclusive lawn tennis release in 1928.

In 1983 Robinson's Barley Water produced a Sporting Records series which featured many tennis superstars of the era like Billie Jean King.

In 1986 Panini trading cards produced a Supersport series featuring Tennis trading cards.

In 1996 the Intrepid trading card company produced the only Australian market tennis trading card release " Blitz ".

During the 1990s and early 2000s the major players in the international tennis trading card market have been NetPro, Leaf and Ace Authentic. Upper Deck has also produced tennis trading cards as part of its Goodwin's Champions annual series.

Wrestling[edit]

Wrestling cards will usually feature one or more Wrestling players or another Wrestling-related theme.

Custom Trading Cards[edit]

Custom Trading Cards are cards more geared to the public to have personal cards.

Manufacturers[edit]

This list contains companies that produce, or have produced, sports trading cards. This list does not contain all the brand names associated with their respective manufacturers.

Notes
  1. ^In most cases, ATC commercialised its card through its several brands of cigarettes. In other cases, non-baseball cards appeared on collections including various sports.
  2. ^Gum, Inc. from 1939 to 1941. Bowman Gum from 1948 to 1955. Includes trading cards manufactured under Play Ball. Topps acquired the company in 1956.</ref>[78][79][80][81][82]
  3. ^Includes trading cards manufactured under Classic Games, Inc., Classic/Scoreboard and Score Board.</ref>[83][84][85]
  4. ^Includes trading cards manufactured under Donruss and Donruss/Playoff.</ref>[89][90]
  5. ^Manufactured trading cards from 1959 to 2005, save 1964, 1965 and 1967. Upper Deck acquired the brand name in 2005.[92]
  6. ^Manufactured trading cards from 1948 to 1960.</ref>[101]
  7. ^Manufactured trading cards from 1984 to 2005. Donruss/Playoff acquired their brand names in 2005.</ref>[107]
  8. ^Includes trading cards manufactured under Sportflics and Pinnacle/Score.</ref>[110][111]
  9. ^Manufactured trading cards from 1990 to 1995. Fleer acquired SkyBox in 1995.</ref>[121]
  10. ^Spanish company established in 2009 that released digital cards only.[22][23]

Non-sports cards[edit]

Further information: Non-sports trading card, Collectible card game, List of collectible card games, and List of non-sports trading cards

Non-sports trading cards feature subject material relating to anything other than sports, such as comics, movies, music and television.[133]Supersisters was a set of 72 trading cards produced and distributed in the United States in 1979 by Supersisters, Inc, featuring famous women from politics, media and entertainment, culture, and other areas of achievement. The cards were designed in response to the trading cards popular among children in the US at the time which mostly featured men.

The following list includes companies that, apart of producing sports cards, manufacture/have manufactured non-sports cards as well:

For companies that produce non-sports cards exclusively, see Non-sports manufacturers

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^"Baseball Card History, News, and Reviews". CardboardConnection.com. The Cardboard Connection. Archived from the original on 1 September 2012. Retrieved 16 May 2012.
  2. ^What is what we collect? by Sam Whiting, 26 Oct 2014
  3. ^Trading Card Central. 2007. 29 Jan. 2008
  4. ^ ab"The History of Cartophily". Archived from the original on May 23, 2013.
  5. ^"Cigarette Cards and Cartophily". Retrieved 14 February 2018.
  6. ^"Cigarette Card Guide (Collectibles) History and Grading". Retrieved 14 February 2018.
  7. ^"Early Trade Cards". www.cycleback.com.
  8. ^ ab"The History of the T206 Honus Wagner Baseball Card". CardboardConnection.com. The Cardboard Connection. 2 March 2012. Retrieved 16 May 2012.
  9. ^"Tobacco Baseball Cards". www.baseball-almanac.com. Retrieved 14 February 2018.
  10. ^"The History of Goudey Gum Company". Professional Sports Authenticator (PSA). Archived from the original on July 15, 2011.
  11. ^"1933 Goudey Baseball Cards". CardboardConnection.com. The Cardboard Connection. Retrieved 16 May 2012.
  12. ^"1951 Topps Baseball Cards". CardboardConnection.com. The Cardboard Connection. Retrieved 16 May 2012.
  13. ^"1952 Topps Baseball Cards". CardboardConnection.com. The Cardboard Connection. Retrieved 16 May 2012.
  14. ^"Mickey Mantle's Rookie Card Guide". CardboardConnection.com. The Cardboard Connection. Retrieved 16 May 2012.
  15. ^"Topps History". Archived from the original on 2010-04-01. Retrieved 2019-01-04.
  16. ^Star Wars Super Collector's Wish Book Identification and Values, Geoffrey T. Carlton, Collector Books, Paducah, KY, ISBN 1-57432-289-3
  17. ^"Barren AARON's GPK World". members.tripod.com. Retrieved 14 February 2018.
  18. ^"History of The Topps Company, Inc. – FundingUniverse". www.fundinguniverse.com. Retrieved 14 February 2018.
  19. ^Pace, Michael. "Computer-based trading card system and method". Michael Pace Digital. Retrieved 22 August 2021.
  20. ^"eTopps Brand Retired". etopps.com
Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trading_card

BUSINESS NAME

CITY

STATE

PHONE

Bosco’s Inc

Anchorage

AK

(907) 274-4112

Big Hits Sportscards

Spanish Fort

AL

(251) 510-3915

CSCE, INC 

Goodyear

AZ

(310) 463-1871

Hartman Enterprises

Phoenix

AZ

(703) 400-4471

North Valley Sports Cards

Glendale

AZ

(623) 979-2273

Showtime Cards

Tucson

AZ

(520) 296-3236

Showtime Sports Cards 

Tempe

AZ

(408) 820-2226

Sports Cards Etc.

Chandler

AZ

(480) 777-2688

Athletic Attitudes

San Francisco

CA

(415) 309-2489

Baseball Cards & Movie Collectables, Etc.

Woodland Hills

CA

(818) 610-2273

Burbank Sportscards

Burbank

CA

(818) 843-2600

California Card Sharks

Modesto

CA

(209) 602-4915

Collectorz City, LLC

Anaheim

CA

(714) 685-1865

El Dorado Hills Sports Card Co.

El Dorado Hills

CA

(916) 933-3987

Funkalicious

Carpinteria

CA

(805) 705-9722

H&H Baseball Cards

Bakersfield

CA

(661) 324-1062

MVP Sportscards

Laguna Hills

CA

(949) 837-7830

Peninsula Sports Cards

Belmont

CA

(650) 595-5115

SoCal Sportscards

Dana Point

CA

(949) 295-1624

South Bay Sports Cards

Sunnyvale

CA

(408) 530-8250

Southbay Baseball Cards 

Rancho Palos Verdes

CA

(310) 530-5818

Stevens Creek Sports Cards

San Jose

CA

(408) 243-1120

The OC Dugout

Anaheim

CA

(714) 527-6319

Three J’s Sportscards

Anaheim

CA

(714) 758-3803

Union Grove Music

Santa Cruz

CA

(831) 427-0670

Wax Czar

Reseda

CA

(818) 705-2255

Wozniak Dist, LLC

San Diego

CA

(760) 415-9699

Pastime Sports & Games

Langley

CAN

(604) 530-5507

All C’s Collectibles

Aurora

CO

(303) 751-6882

Bill’s Sports Collectibles

Denver

CO

(303) 733-4878

Dale’zKard’s

Colorado Springs

CO

(719) 528-5959

John’s Sports Collectibles

Colorado Springs

CO

(719) 574-7040

Mike’s Stadium Sportscards

Aurora

CO

(303) 699-9808

SolarFly Cards

Boulder

CO

(330) 714-6098

Ultimate Sports

Grand Junction

CO

(970) 314-2092

Edward Skinnon

Southington

CT

(860) 919-0879

Kevin’s Cards

North Haven

CT

(203) 239-1074

Omni Comics and Cards

Bristol

CT

(860) 571-0138

End Zone Sports

Milford

DE

(302) 335-3935

Dan’s Sports Cards & Games

Jacksonville

FL

(904) 777-4548

Dick & Jane’s Sportscards

Jacksonville

FL

(904) 725-2316

Eugene Man

Orlando

FL

(407) 923-3244

Jacksonville Stamp & Coin

Jacksonville

FL

(904) 234-0191

LIVECASEBREAK, LLC

Plantation

FL

(954) 617-0440

Price Busters Games

Pensacola

FL

(850) 912-8922

Heroes LLC

Newnan

GA

(678) 485-3861

Sports Legends

Fayetteville

GA

(678) 779-0540

AJTK Sportscards

Aiea

HI

(808) 487-6620

K-Kards

Honolulu

HI

(808) 228-0608

Paula’s Sports Cards

Honolulu

HI

(808) 533-4886

Sports Center

Honolulu

HI

(808) 593-0246

Chucks Sports Cards Plus

Des Moines

IA

(515) 480-1077

Midwest Collectables

Davenport

IA

(563) 823-1775

Ryanscardz

Urbandale

IA

(515) 491-8403

The Rookie

Windsor Heights

IA

(515) 255-4675

Jerry’s Rookie Shop

Boise

ID

(208) 338-3828

Baseball Card Collectibles

Shobonier

IL

(618) 349-8348

Bergie’s Sports Cards Dugout

Highland Park

IL

(847) 433-2250

Chicagoland Sports Cards

Buffalo Grove

IL

(847) 229-2626

Diamond Cards

Quincy

IL

(214) 222-1556

Frivolous Sells

Hoffman Estates

IL

(847) 757-9005

Galaxy Stores

Naperville

IL

(630) 637-0187

Jim & Steve’s Sportscards

Waukegan

IL

(847) 244-1981

Matt’s Sports Cards

Lockport

IL

(815) 729-4292

Miller’s Collector’s Corner

New Baden

IL

(618) 206-8777

Ripkings

Downers Grove

IL

(630) 930-2626

Super Sexy Cardboard

Kewanee

IL

(309) 525-0889

Triple Crown Trading Company 

Naperville

IL

(630) 357-7707

Whatnot Collectibles Shop

Chatham

IL

(217) 553-3278

Baseball Card Exchange

Indianapolis

IN

(317) 254-8681

Big Time Breaks

Lafayette

IN

(765) 588-8130

Don’s Dugout

Seymour

IN

(812) 522-4909

Gotta Have it Collectibles

Lake Station

IN

(219) 962-1900

Kam’s OTW Cards

Evansville

IN

(812) 402-2231

Snoopy 351

Zionsville

IN

(217) 590-9059

Collector’s Cache, LLC

lenexa

KS

(913) 338-2273

OliversSportscards & Memorabilia

Wichita

KS

(316) 425-1938

R&D Collectibles

Topeka

KS

(785) 233-2510

GNT Sportscards

Bowling Green

KY

(270) 991-5005

Mount Sterling Baseball Cards

Mount Sterling

KY

(859) 498-6582

Redman’s Dugout

Glasgow

KY

(270) 651-2308

Sports Card & Gaming Exchange

Dry Ridge

KY

(859) 322-2341

Jason’s Sports Cards

Baton Rouge

LA

(225) 291-4018

Primetime Sports

Baton Rouge

LA

(504) 874-7878

Sports Center Collectables LLC

Slidell

LA

(504) 439-0684

LJ’s Sportscards

Southbridge

MA

(508) 765-0533

LTD Sports

Westport

MA

(774) 319-5200

New England Sportscards

Pepperell

MA

(603) 249-9061

P&T Sportscards

Fairhaven

MA

(781) 447-0777

Southeastern Sports Cards

Westport

MA

(774) 319-5200

All in Cards

Baltimore

MD

(410) 484-5069

All Seasons Sports Cards

Frostburg

MD

(301) 689-5668

Baseball Card Outlet

Baltimore

MD

(401) 284-7922

Kencor

Fenton

MI

(734) 699-5065

Lou Brown Cards, Inc.

Grand Rapids

MI

(616) 940-8173 x104

Stadium Cards & Comics

Ypsilanti

MI

(734) 434-0283

Med City Memorabilia

Rochester

MN

(507) 202-3470

PSA Sports Auctions

Maple Grove

MN

(763) 553-2995

Sideline Sports Collectibles 

Saint Cloud

MN

(320) 217-2116

Three Stars Sportscards

Saint Paul

MN

(651) 633-6041

Centerfield Sports

Springfield

MO

(417) 831-7675

The Collector Store LLC

Saint Charles

MO

(636) 477-7800

Vettes and Cards

Pacific

MO

(636) 257-3486

D&M Sportscards

Moncton

NB

(506) 852-3244

All Things Collectible

Gastonia

NC

(704) 824-0010

Bryans Sportscards

Charlotte

NC

(704) 763-5495

Crane’s Cards

Winston Salem

NC

(336) 723-3420

EE Cards Unlimited

Charlotte

NC

(703) 798-2105

Gold Buyers Jewelry Coin & Collectibles

Cary

NC

(919) 900-7388

Greg’s Cards

Spruce Pine

NC

(828) 765-9778

Legends Autographs

Clayton

NC

(860) 614-5834

Scott’s Toys & Collectibles

Lexington

NC

(336) 731-6324

The Hobby Box

Wilmington

NC

(910) 350-2858

Dakota Gaming Supply

Bismarck

ND

(701) 226-4635

Matthew Myers

Omaha

NE

(402) 677-4210

Prep 2 Pro Sports (NE-PREP)

Norfolk

NE

(402) 371-3351

Wes’ Baseball Cards Inc.

Lincoln

NE

(402) 488-3775

East Coast Card Connection

Lyndhurst

NJ

(204) 438-4327

Northeast Sportscards

Basking Ridge

NJ

(973) 727-3741

On Deck Baseball Cards

Millville

NJ

(856) 825-8703

Perfectly Centered

Roselle Park

NJ

(908) 241-1112

RDC Cards

Cranford

NJ

(908) 709-0635

The Baseball Card Store, Inc.

Ramsey

NJ

(201) 445-9007

Charlie’s Cardz

Albuquerque

NM

(505) 269-4196

Legacy Sports Cards 

Las Vegas

NV

(702) 341-6525

A&S Sports 

Westbury

NY

(516) 398-7800

American Legends

Bronxville

NY

(914) 725-2225

BP Sportscards (NY-BPCARD)

Florida

NY

(845) 651-1660

Chameleon Comics

New York

NY

(212) 587-3411

First International Health Foods

Haverstraw

NY

(845) 323-2916

Izzy’s Cards

Bethpage

NY

(516) 428-5702

MattsBaseball.com

Watervliet

NY

(800) 675-1898

MMC Sports Cards

Baldwin

NY

(516) 546-1571

Never Enough Cards

Port Jefferson Station

NY

(631) 331-3629

Six Eight Cards

Tonawanda

NY

(716) 803-3323

  1. Breyer Unique, Inc.

Southold

NY

(631) 765-8124

The Bullpen

New Windsor

NY

(845) 569-3080

TNT Sportscards

Tallman

NY

(201) 390-1368

ToyWiz

Suffern

NY

(845) 624-1995

All-Pro Sportscards

Cuyahoga Falls

OH

(330) 922-4642

Antique Cards and Cars Inc.

Brookville

OH

(937) 833-4422

Bomber Sports Cards

Pepper Pike

OH

(216) 245-8799

Cards for Collectors

Cincinnati

OH

(513) 761-0593

Grand Slam Sports

Chagrin Falls

OH

(440) 543-2758

Hooked On Cards Wholesale 

North Ridgeville

OH

(877) 704-5609

Matthew Wahlert

Cincinnati

OH

(513) 245-2469

Off the Charts

Cincinnati

OH

(513) 403-1755

OH-DREAMS Cardboard Dreams

Akron

OH

(330) 699-2881

OTP Cards & Collectibles

Alliance

OH

(330) 356-0821

Over the Fence

Eastlake

OH

(440) 953-2700

Ice Box Cards & Collectibles

Barrie

Ontario

(705) 739-1010

Card Stadium

Harrisburg

PA

(717) 234-0655

Cards & Sports, Inc.

Media

PA

(610) 566-0655

Dave’s Sports Cards

Erie

PA

(814) 868-0826

Georgetown Card Exchange, Inc. 

Hatboro

PA

(215) 675-2813

Greentree Sports Cards

Pittsburgh

PA

(412) 937-0540

Hill’s Wholesale Gaming

Forbes Road

PA

(412) 610-1942

Joe’s Sports Cards & Collectibles 

Greensburg

PA

(724) 830-0873

Juniata Cards

Altoona

PA

(814) 944-0810

Kinem’s Collectibles

Eric

PA

(814) 864-2309

Peter Comparetto’s Cards

Levittown

PA

(215) 785-4967

SD Trading

Yardley

PA

(215) 530-4365

Sports Vault

Exton

PA

(610) 344-3260 x216

Sportscards Etc.

Mc Kees Rocks

PA

(412) 787-3235

Steele City Collectibles 

McKeesport 

PA

(412) 672-6200

Steele City Collectibles 

Pittsburgh

PA

(412) 366-5858

WoWo Cards

Erie

PA

(814) 566-1381

Legends Sports Cards

Sioux Falls

SD

(605) 376-3112

Mark’s Novelties

Johnson City

TN

(423) 929-0283

Marty’s Sportscard Exchange

Chattanooga

TN

(423) 648-7037

Sports Treasures

Knoxville

TN

(865) 688-2273

The Dugout

Sevierville

TN

(865) 429-3373

A&J Sportscards

Happy

TX

(541) 343-5561

Collector’s Den

Wichita Falls

TX

(940) 851-0777

Dllove Comics and Cards

Cypress

TX

(713) 560-3479

Empire Collectibles

Corpus Christi

TX

(361) 462-2924

Kenny’s Collectibles of Austin

Austin

TX

(512) 748-9718

Nick’s Sports Cards

Dallas

TX

(972) 248-2271

SATX Cards

San Antonio

TX

(210) 784-7821

SMP Sportscards

Grapevine

TX

(817) 251-1752

Sports Cards Plus

San Antonio

TX

(210) 524-2337

The Old Ball Park 

Alvin

TX

(281) 585-8800

Triple Cards & Collectibles

Plano

TX

(972) 509-5263

Overtime Cards

Midvale

UT

(801) 566-3100

Blowout Cards

Sterling

VA

(703) 953-3131

Chart Toppers Sports Cards

Virginia Beach

VA

(214) 686-7364

Collector’s Corner

Sterling

VA

(703) 450-7280

Collector’s Heaven

Richmond

VA

(804) 673-1127

Gene’s Dugout

Arlington

VA

(703) 534-1360

Heroes Sports Cards

Virginia Beach

VA

(757) 313-2694

Pigeons Sports Cards

Ashburn

VA

(803) 479-3292

Scott Sams

Glen Allen

VA

(804) 339-4426

The Card Cellar

Fredericksberg

VA

(540) 891-9549

Card Exchange

Seattle

WA

(206) 440-5466

Digital Heroes

Walla Walla

WA

(509) 525-0380

Mad AL Distributors

Fife

WA

(907) 274-4115

Mill Creek Sports

Mill Creek

WA

(425) 742-8500

The Baseball Card Shop 

Puyallup

WA

(253) 848-8662

Kryptonite Kollectibles 

Janesville

WI

(608) 758-2100

Power Sportscards

Plymouth

WI

(920) 893-9661

Sports Dome Kenosha

Kenosha

WI

(262) 697-9288

Card Express

China

Flash Shop

China

Lanxing Card House

Hong Kong

Mint Company Limited

Japan

Ricky’s Card Shop

China

Shanghai Ruika Trading Co., Ltd.

China

Источник: https://www.decision2016tradingcards.com/pages/find-a-dealer

Vintage Baseball Card Stores

Yes, some collectors still like to do business in person!  So we’ve assembled a collection of the best sports card stores that sell a large assortment of vintage cards. 

This list is based on my research and experience so if you have a store that’s not listed, please shoot me an email at [email protected] 

Please ensure they sell vintage cards and provide some notes if possible as to what sorts of cards they specialize in. 

This list will be frequently updated.  Feel free to drop a comment below on any of these stores or other vintage shops.

Cavalier Cards – Charlottesville, Virginia
If heading there, make sure the owner Jeff is there, he has a binder and other vintage for sale. 

Burbank Sports Cards – Burbank, California
Lot of vintage cards, also has online eBay store under the same name

Stevens Creek Sportscards – San Jose, California
Good assortment of vintage, ask for Kevin…. they also have an eBay store under the same name.

Sports Heroes – Cranston, Rhode Island
Sells single cards from all four major sports from the 1950s to the present

Baseball Card Exchange – Schererville, Indiana
These guys are the kings of unopened wax, so if you’re looking for any older wax this is the place to visit.

Kenmore Collectibles – Boston, Massachusetts
Has an extensive inventory of older vintage post- and pre-war cards

The Battersbox – Tomball, Texas 
Specializes in everything vintage and has been around for a while, since 1990

DJ’s Sports Cards – Renton, Washington
Great mix of new and vintage, gets great reviews from customers

Mike’s Stadium Sports Cards – Aurora, Colorado
Hosts trade nights, has lots of giveaways, and lots of vintage and pre-war cards for sale

Dugout Dreams – Danbury, Connecticut
Lots of vintage cards, from pre-war up until the 1970’s

Bases Loaded Sports Collectibles – Buffalo, New York
Awesome owners here, super friendly with a great assortment of vintage cards

Источник: https://allvintagecards.com/vintage-baseball-card-stores/

Where can i sell my postcards



where can i sell my postcards All orders have upfront price quotes, free shipping, and fast payment. Thank you for the help! Mar 22, 2021 · 14. Whether you need money for financial reasons such as a wedding, a down payment on a car or house, or if your heart just isn’t in it anymore, it can be a tough decision. 53 and up) to send. We actually recommend against selling on eBay so often that we created a resource called 7 reasons why you Most people choose to sell their gift cards for cash, either online or in person. We're the smart alternative to selling your posters at online auctions or auction houses. Earn the most money with our online trading card and limited edition collectibles program. offers the best prices for original vintage movie posters, classic lobby cards, music concert posters, vintage pictures and photography. You only pay a payment processing fee. Mar 22, 2021 · 14. com for cards and compare the pricing of other sellers on the marketplace. Etsy has a great search feature that ensures Selling to the Buy Bots. No Listing fees. For some of the more in-demand cards, a seller can make upto 90% of the face value of the card itself. Prices of cards range from as little as $3. Partner with us and sell ecards that can make ends meets or help your fundraising. You can reach our partners at BaseballCardBuyer. For instance, with Buyback Boss, you can sell your Pokémon cards without creating listings or paying to ship them to us. Always fill out the form above or call us at (231)-882-9173 to talk about your That being said, some postcards can be valuable. Most cards stand upright in stacks, so it’s vital that you Sell Your Sports Cards and Memorabilia to Us. Although trading in your gift card at a physical location allows you to get your hands on the cash sooner, it’s also a lot more inconvenient than doing the whole trade-in process from the comfort of your home. Feedback Welcome. The good news is that selling your sports card collection on Beckett is simple. $ 10 - $ 500. See reviews, photos, directions, phone numbers and more for Where Can I Go To Sell Pokemon Cards locations in Dallas, TX. 15. eBay is a popular place for collectors to buy cards, and it is a good place to sell your cards yourself. Get a quote for your old trading cards today. Jun 03, 2018 · We sell online what we can’t sell locally, so we adhere to the condition guidelines of whoever we’re working with (in this case, TCGPlayer). Atomic Mall is rated “Great” on Trustpilot, making it a legit place to sell basketball cards. From valuable single baseball cards to complete coin collections, rare entertainment memorabilia, comics, autographs and everything in between; here at Collectibles Investment Group, you Jul 22, 2014 · Selling an item or two using internet platforms such as eBay, Collectors Corner and the like is often as simple as setting up a seller's account. Shutterfly can turn your images into calendars, photo gifts, and other popular products. Outside of the truly rare cards, anything you likely possess is bought and/or sold on eBay quite often, so you can see exactly what similar cards have sold for in the recent weeks. Book stores. To qualify for postcard pricing, your mailer must be at least 3 ½” high, 5” long and 0. lunchbreaklaunch. From valuable single baseball cards to complete coin collections, rare entertainment memorabilia, comics, autographs and everything in between; here at Collectibles Investment Group, you Oct 28, 2021 · These 17 places to sell sports cards are all fantastic places for you to start. Sell your collectibles for cash. According to our past customers, selling to Bitpro is fast, safe & hassle-free. May 15, 2018 · If you have placed order (s) of $50 or more during the last 6 months through me, Lisa Brown of Ink and Inspirations, you will be receiving a new Stampin' Up! Catalog from me. And when you sell the card, the company will take a 12% cut—so even if you get someone to pay full value for your gift card If you are wanting to sell your cards individually by mail. Most postcards are worthless. So, the first thing you need to do is see if there are even enough places that can sell your cards. Oct 28, 2021 · These 17 places to sell sports cards are all fantastic places for you to start. We spent over $70 million dollars in the past five years. Up to 4 % off. +. If you accept the offer, the reseller takes the plastic and you walk away with the money. TCGPlayer allows you to either sell the cards yourself on the platform or sell the cards to the site’s buylist. Here’s what you can do to make use of the card: Oct 28, 2021 · These 17 places to sell sports cards are all fantastic places for you to start. Zazzle handles all of the product fulfillment and customer service while you Step 5: Research ways to sell your cards. The first one involves viewing the prices for each of the cards. Tourist information offices (or simply around tourist attractions) Museum and gift shops. ” - Audrey C • Girly Trend On Zazzle, you set the royalty rate* for your designs and you receive a royalty payout for every product sold with your design. Beckett is a popular marketplace for selling sports cards. Selling on eBay. $ 10 - $ 100. eBay and Etsy are also options for selling your photos online. 98 We Buy Baseball Cards & Sports Trading Cards. Most notable are the various new methods of buying and selling collectibles. Sell my card designs >. The tradeline buyer gets a quick credit boost, and you — the tradeline seller — make potentially hundreds of dollars for a few minutes of your time. You can buy postcards in many different places! Following is a small list of locations where our members have found them for sale: Post offices. You'll need to: 1. Here you’ll choose your store name, which will become your domain, or, the URL that your customers will go to when they want to purchase your gift card. com is one of the largest online vintage postcard dealers. However, selling your vintage baseball, football, basketball or hockey cards through those who specialize in buying is one way to go and there are several options to do that online. Find 419 listings related to Where Can I Go To Sell Pokemon Cards in Dallas on YP. How fast can I receive cash for my gift cards? Unlike online exchanges, Check Into Cash will put cash in your hand immediately, so there’s no waiting. Our fair market offers make sense for those looking to move graphics cards in bulk. List like a pro Sell your trading cards for cash. Oct 22, 2014 · Etsy is an online retailer that sells unique, hand-made, and other non-mass produced items. The first step is to visit shopify. Greeting cards can be printed in a variety of sizes. Up to 3. We are antique postcard buyers interested in buying whole collections of vintage postcards. 1 % off. If you need immediate cash for your gift cards from over 150 stores, then you can instantly exchange gift cards for cash right in your local grocery store at Coinstar Exchange kiosks. Luckily, there are also plenty of online platforms to choose between. This incites buyers to pick up additional cards, and you can up the margin per card sold by saving on postage costs. There are a variety of great causes like Cards2Kids out there, who can even get you a tax deduction for your donation. We do all lotting, pricing and describing, in other words, all the work. Because ITAD companies buy and sell used IT all day long, they always have the most up-to-date prices, easiest processes, and fastest ways for you to get paid. Tools built to streamline the process for large & small sellers. com. We have five official buy bots: These bots share credits with each other and with all of our sell bots. com May 02, 2021 · Sell vintage postcards and full collections Rare, Unusual & Historical postcards. In case of a sale, the seller needs to first enter details of his gift card on their site, post which he is mailed their best offer. Use them as a new source of revenue, a fundraising tool, or a way to engage with your members of clients to let them know that you care. Experts You Can Trust. This is how most of us “sold” our first Magic cards, by trading them with friends. A list should be created for higher value cards such as Ultra Rares, Hyper Rares, Full Art, Secret Rares & WOTC cards on the Troll & Toad website. Apr 17, 2013 · How to sell your cards. Postcard Mailing is a fast, easy and affordable way to get your marketing message out. Feb 14, 2017 · At retail, collectible postcards normally sell for anywhere from 25¢ to $1000 or more. Some can even bring thousands or hundreds of dollars, but again, they are EXTREMELY rare. Get An Offer For Your Graphics Cards . Takes seconds to list, manage, and ship your sports card. Ralph DeLuca. And by the way, the buyer’s authorized user credit card gets shipped to you Experts You Can Trust. You have your basket to which you will add the ones you want to sell. To move that many cards, you've got to have at least 25-50 stores selling your work. Cardcow. Card shops and shows Oct 28, 2021 · These 17 places to sell sports cards are all fantastic places for you to start. Most antique postcards from the early 1900s are worth $1 or less. We have cash now, and are looking for more collections to buy! To best help you, please choose between these two options: Oct 28, 2021 · These 17 places to sell sports cards are all fantastic places for you to start. 30% Store Credit Bonus. May 15, 2010 · Got Christmas cards, Valentines or other holiday cards to sell? Most card companies allow returns on unsold seasonal cards, and store buyers expect it. Before you trade with CardhoarderBuyBot, CardhoarderBuyBot2, CardhoarderBuyBot3, CardhoarderBuyBot4, or CardhoarderBuyBot5 first you need to determine what cards you want to sell. Popular gift cards on Gameflip are Steam cards, PSN, Xbox Live, Amazon, iTunes, and Google Play cards. No worrying about relisting cards, auctions timing out or complicated trade arrangements. If you have a large collection, one that might take time to sell, it might be worth your while to invest in a scanner. 1. Create your brand One of the first things to know is that the greeting card industry is incredibly competitive, but it's not impossible to break in as a new greeting card line. We even pay your Ecommerce fees. Show all variations of your products. 007” thick (approximately the thickness of an index card), but no more than 4 ¼” high, 6” long May 01, 2020 · At my local mall, there is a kiosk where gift cards can be sold for cash. While this method is the most popular one, you should know that you probably won’t get 100% of the card’s value. #448. Gift Card Granny Why Sell sports cards on SportsCardsPro. And can even include data encouraging home owners to sell their home. Earn a royalty on each card sold. 100 Bulk Voter Postcards 4x6” - One Vote Can Rock the Boat - Red, White and Blue Theme With Blank Back for Message to Voters - Encourage Voting In Your State 4. Start your 14-day free trial. Las Vegas, NV 89117. Gain access to many card buyers. Your Walmart gift card will be listed in front of the thousands of buyers participating in the marketplace. Create a marketable greeting card. Sell Your Products Online - Earn More Money with Wix Save Time and Make More Money with Wix's All-in-One eCommerce Platform! With Secure Payments and Simple Shipping You Can Convert More Users & Sell More! Selling your own greeting cards can be fun and profitable if you know what steps to take. Dec 25, 2017 · You can list any online gift card for free on the site; for physical gift cards, you'll pay $1 or 1% of the total balance, whichever is greater. (Don't forget to enter the card's condition manually. It is an extremely popular store that caters to up-and-coming crafters. It is highly unlikely you will have one of them in your stack of old postcards. Collecting sports cards and memorabilia has evolved dramatically over the years. The tried-and-true method is still effective today, and it guarantees you get 100% of the value of your card–I trade you my $10 Birds of Paradise and in return you trade me a $10 card in return. Apr 06, 2016 · The new Coinstar Exchange kiosks allow you to sell your gift cards for instant cash at your local grocery stores. 00 for one card, to $25. 2. Although your card may sell for less as a result, it is much better than deceiving a buyer who will give you negative feedback on eBay. Since tweeting about making money selling baseball cards several days ago, I had many people email and direct message me with questions. Want To Make Money Online But Don’t Know Where To Start?Click Here ️ ️ ️ https://success. It also constantly challenges me to create and promote new art and therefore grow as an artist and a designer. All you have to do is ship the postcards to us or we can pick up your large collection. Nov 20, 2018 · You can also visit those sites to sell cards, too. Jan 28, 2020 · Sell a gift card for almost its full value. Some of your card stock will become damaged in the store, or just be slow Oct 10, 2019 · Take your community behind-the-scenes using stories to see the hard work that goes into making your products. where can i sell my postcards


Источник: http://lescarnetsdulysse.com/tm5a/where-can-i-sell-my-postcards.html

Where can i sell my postcards



where can i sell my postcards All orders have upfront price quotes, free shipping, and fast payment. Thank you for the help! Mar 22, 2021 · 14. Whether you need money for financial reasons such as a wedding, a down payment on a car or house, or if your heart just isn’t in it anymore, it can be a tough decision. 53 and up) to send. We actually recommend against selling on eBay so often that we created a resource called 7 reasons why you Most people choose to sell their gift cards for cash, either online or in person. We're the smart alternative to selling your posters at online auctions or auction houses. Earn the most money with our online trading card and limited edition collectibles program. offers the best prices for original vintage movie posters, classic lobby cards, music concert posters, vintage pictures and photography. You only pay a payment processing fee. Mar 22, 2021 · 14. com for cards and compare the pricing of other sellers on the marketplace. Etsy has a great search feature that ensures Selling to the Buy Bots. No Listing fees. For some of the more in-demand cards, a seller can make upto 90% of the face value of the card itself. Prices of cards range from as little as $3. Partner with us and sell ecards that can make ends meets or help your fundraising. You can reach our partners at BaseballCardBuyer. For instance, with Buyback Boss, you can sell your Pokémon cards without creating listings or paying to ship them to us. Always fill out the form above or call us at (231)-882-9173 to talk about your That being said, some postcards can be valuable. Most cards stand upright in stacks, so it’s vital that you Sell Your Sports Cards and Memorabilia to Us. Although trading in your gift card at a physical location allows you to get your hands on the cash sooner, it’s also a lot more inconvenient than doing the whole trade-in process from the comfort of your home. Feedback Welcome. The good news is that selling your sports card collection on Beckett is simple. $ 10 - $ 500. See reviews, photos, directions, phone numbers and more for Where Can I Go To Sell Pokemon Cards locations in Dallas, TX. 15. eBay is a popular place for collectors to buy cards, and it is a good place to sell your cards yourself. Get a quote for your old trading cards today. Jun 03, 2018 · We sell online what we can’t sell locally, so we adhere to the condition guidelines of whoever we’re working with (in this case, TCGPlayer). Atomic Mall is rated “Great” on Trustpilot, making it a legit place to sell basketball cards. From valuable single baseball cards to complete coin collections, rare entertainment memorabilia, comics, autographs and everything in between; here at Collectibles Investment Group, you Jul 22, 2014 · Selling an item or two using internet platforms such as eBay, Collectors Corner and the like is often as simple as setting up a seller's account. Shutterfly can turn your images into calendars, photo gifts, and other popular products. Outside of the truly rare cards, anything you likely possess is bought and/or sold on eBay quite often, so you can see exactly what similar cards have sold for in the recent weeks. Book stores. To qualify for postcard pricing, your mailer must be at least 3 ½” high, 5” long and 0. lunchbreaklaunch. From valuable single baseball cards to complete coin collections, rare entertainment memorabilia, comics, autographs and everything in between; here at Collectibles Investment Group, you Oct 28, 2021 · These 17 places to sell sports cards are all fantastic places for you to start. Sell your collectibles for cash. According to our past customers, selling to Bitpro is fast, safe & hassle-free. May 15, 2018 · If you have placed order (s) of $50 or more during the last 6 months through me, Lisa Brown of Ink and Inspirations, you will be receiving a new Stampin' Up! Catalog from me. And when you sell the card, the company will take a 12% cut—so even if you get someone to pay full value for your gift card If you are wanting to sell your cards individually by mail. baseball card exchange store Most postcards are worthless. So, the first thing you need to do is see if there are even enough places that can sell your cards. Oct 28, 2021 · These 17 places to sell sports cards are all fantastic places for you to start. We spent over $70 million dollars in the past five years. Up to 4 % off. +. If you accept the offer, the reseller takes the plastic and you walk away with the money. TCGPlayer allows you to either sell the cards yourself on the platform or sell the cards to the site’s buylist. Here’s what you can do to make use of the card: Oct 28, 2021 · These 17 places to sell sports cards are all fantastic places for you to start. Zazzle handles all of the product fulfillment and customer service while you Step 5: Research ways to sell your cards. The first one involves viewing the prices for each of the cards. Tourist information offices (or simply around tourist attractions) Museum and gift shops. ” - Audrey C • Girly Trend On Zazzle, you set the royalty rate* for your designs and you receive a royalty payout for every product sold with your design. Beckett is a popular marketplace for selling sports cards. Selling on eBay. $ 10 - $ 100. eBay and Etsy are also options for selling your photos online. 98 We Buy Baseball Cards & Sports Trading Cards. Most notable are the various new methods of buying and selling collectibles. Sell my card designs >. The tradeline buyer gets a quick credit boost, and you — the tradeline seller — make potentially hundreds of dollars for a few minutes of your time. You can buy postcards in many different places! Following is a small list of locations where our members have found them for sale: Post offices. You'll need to: 1. Here you’ll choose your store name, which will become your domain, or, the URL that your customers will go to when they want to purchase your gift card. com is one of the largest online vintage postcard dealers. However, selling your vintage baseball, football, basketball or hockey cards through those who specialize in buying is one way to go and there are several options to do that online. Find 419 listings related to Where Can I Go To Sell Pokemon Cards in Dallas on YP. How fast can I receive cash for my gift cards? Unlike online exchanges, Check Into Cash will put cash in your hand immediately, so there’s no waiting. Our fair market offers make sense for those looking to move graphics cards in bulk. List like a pro Sell your trading cards for cash. Oct 22, 2014 · Etsy is an online retailer that sells unique, hand-made, and other non-mass produced items. The first step is to visit shopify. Greeting cards can be printed in a variety of sizes. Up to 3. We are antique postcard buyers interested in buying whole collections of vintage postcards. 1 % off. If you need immediate cash for your gift cards from over 150 stores, then you can instantly exchange gift cards for cash right in your local grocery store at Coinstar Exchange kiosks. Luckily, there are also plenty of online platforms to choose between. This incites buyers to pick up additional cards, and you can up the margin per card sold by saving on postage costs. There are a variety of great causes like Cards2Kids out there, who can even get you a tax deduction for your donation. We do all lotting, pricing and describing, in other words, all the work. Because ITAD companies buy and sell used IT all day long, they always have the most up-to-date prices, easiest processes, and fastest ways for you to get paid. Tools built to streamline the process for large & small sellers. com. We have five official buy bots: These bots share credits with each other and with all of our sell bots. com May 02, 2021 · Sell vintage postcards and full collections Rare, Unusual & Historical postcards. In case of a sale, the seller needs to first enter details of his gift card on their site, post which he is mailed their best offer. Use them as a new source of revenue, a fundraising tool, or a way to engage with your members of clients to let them know that you care. Experts You Can Trust. This is how most of us “sold” our first Magic cards, by trading them with friends. A list should be created for higher value cards such as Ultra Rares, Hyper Rares, Full Art, Secret Rares & WOTC cards on the Troll & Toad website. Apr 17, 2013 · How to sell your cards. Postcard Mailing is a fast, easy and affordable way to get your marketing message out. Feb 14, 2017 · At retail, collectible postcards normally sell for anywhere from 25¢ to $1000 or more. Some can even bring thousands or hundreds of dollars, baseball card exchange store again, they are EXTREMELY rare. Get An Offer For Your Graphics Cards. Takes seconds to list, manage, and ship your sports card. Ralph DeLuca. And by the way, the buyer’s authorized user credit card gets shipped to you Experts You Can Trust. You have your basket to which you will add the ones you want to sell. To move that many cards, you've got to have at least 25-50 stores selling your work. Cardcow. Card shops and shows Oct 28, 2021 · These 17 places to sell sports cards are all fantastic places for you to start. Most antique postcards from the early 1900s are worth $1 or less. We have cash now, and are looking for more collections to buy! To best help you, please choose between these two options: Oct 28, 2021 · These 17 places to sell sports cards are all fantastic places for you to start. 30% Store Credit Bonus. May 15, 2010 · Got Christmas cards, Valentines or other holiday cards to sell? Most card companies allow returns on unsold seasonal cards, and store buyers expect it. Before you trade with CardhoarderBuyBot, CardhoarderBuyBot2, CardhoarderBuyBot3, CardhoarderBuyBot4, or CardhoarderBuyBot5 first you need to determine what cards you want to sell. Popular gift cards on Gameflip are Steam cards, PSN, Xbox Live, Amazon, iTunes, and Google Play cards. No worrying about relisting cards, auctions timing out or complicated trade arrangements. If you have a large collection, one that might take time to sell, it might be worth your while to invest in a scanner. 1. Create your brand One of the first things to know is that the greeting card industry is incredibly competitive, but it's not impossible to break in as a new greeting card line. We even pay your Ecommerce fees. Show all variations of your products. 007” thick (approximately the thickness of an index card), but no more than 4 ¼” high, 6” long May 01, 2020 · At my local mall, there is a kiosk where gift cards can be sold for cash. While this method is the most popular one, you should know that you probably won’t get 100% of the card’s value. #448. Gift Card Granny Why Sell sports cards on SportsCardsPro. And can even include data encouraging home owners to sell their home. Earn a royalty on each card sold. 100 Bulk Voter Postcards 4x6” - One Vote Can Rock the Boat - Red, White and Blue Theme With Blank Back for Message to Voters - Encourage Voting In Your State 4. Start your 14-day free trial. Las Vegas, NV 89117. Gain access to many card buyers. Your Walmart gift card will be listed in front of the thousands of buyers participating in the marketplace. Create a marketable greeting card. Sell Your Products Online - Earn More Money with Wix Save Time and Make More Money with Wix's All-in-One eCommerce Platform! With Secure Payments and Simple Shipping You Can Convert More Users & Sell More! Selling your own greeting cards can be fun and profitable if you know what steps to take. Dec 25, 2017 · You can list any online gift card for free on the site; for physical gift cards, you'll pay $1 or 1% of the total balance, whichever is greater. (Don't forget to enter the card's condition manually. It is an extremely popular store that caters to up-and-coming crafters. It is highly unlikely you will have one of them in your stack of old postcards. Collecting sports cards and memorabilia has evolved dramatically over the years. The tried-and-true method is still effective today, and it guarantees you get 100% of the value of baseball card exchange store card–I trade you my $10 Birds of Paradise and in return you trade me a $10 card in return. Apr 06, 2016 · The new Coinstar Exchange kiosks allow you to sell your gift cards for instant cash at your local grocery stores. 00 for one card, to $25. 2. Although your card may sell for less as a result, it is much better than deceiving a buyer who will give you negative feedback on eBay. Since tweeting about making money selling baseball cards several days ago, I had many people email and direct message me with questions. Want To Make Money Online But Don’t Know Where To Start?Click Here ️ ️ ️ https://success. It also constantly challenges me to create and promote new art and therefore grow as an artist and a designer. All you have to do is ship the postcards to us or we can pick up your large collection. Nov 20, 2018 · You can also visit those sites to sell cards, too. Jan 28, 2020 · Sell a gift card for almost its full value. Some of your card stock will become damaged in the store, or just be slow Oct 10, 2019 · Take your community behind-the-scenes using stories to see the hard work that goes into making your products. where can i sell my postcards


Источник: http://lescarnetsdulysse.com/tm5a/where-can-i-sell-my-postcards.html
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Top Shot sales are just the start. Coming off his seventh Super Bowl victory, Brady announced this week the launch of his own NFT company called Autograph. Mavericks billionaire owner Mark Cuban started an NFT art gallery, and athletes including Kansas City Chiefs quarterback Patrick Mahomes and PGA Tour golfer Bryson DeChambeau have created and sold NFTs.

'More time on their hand'

For card dealers like Ron Gustafson, owner of MVP Sports Cards & Collectibles in Sebastian, Florida, the timing of Topps' plan to hit the public market is fascinating. From his 1,000-square-foot shop in a strip mall near the coast, Gustafson has witnessed firsthand the remarkable rebound of a business that in recent decades has trended more in the direction of traditional retail.

Gustafson, who has three daughters, opened his store in 2017 as a passion project and side gig to the tax business he's owned since 2008. He said that when the pandemic hit, things were very slow at first because of the shutdowns and concerns about the economy. The resurgence began around the time the NBA restarted its season in the Orlando bubble in July, he said.

"That really helped as far as getting sports fans back," Gustafson said. "The card market just completely skyrocketed. Maybe folks were home and more people had more time on their hand."

Even with store occupancy limits and appointment viewing, Gustafson said he recently recouped his initial $250,000 he put into the business and is now seeing gains. While Topps controls most of the baseball card market, the more popular products right now are football cards and the most expensive are basketball, he said. Panini America owns the licenses for those leagues.

A surprise customer

Gustafson said his most interesting appointment of the year came one Saturday in March, after he got a call from someone asking if his store had any boxes of Panini's Prizm football cards, which he sells for $1,500. Gustafson said he did, and the man told him he'd be there in a half hour.

When he arrived, the man asked Gustafson if he happened to have any rookie cards for Alex Bregman, an infielder for the Houston Astros. Gustafson said he didn't and asked why he was looking.

"He said, 'Because I'm Alex Bregman,'" Gustafson said. "Sure enough, he grabbed the last three Prizm boxes off the shelf and let us take a picture."

Alex Bregman of the Houston Astros at MVP Sports Cards & Collectibles in Sebastian, Florida.

Bregman was in Florida for Spring Training. The Astros play about 90 miles south of Sebastian, in West Palm Beach but had a game that day against the New York Mets in the nearby town of Port St. Lucie. Gustafson said he originally planned to attend the game that day and was going to let his store manager run the shop.

"Had I gone to the game I would have missed Alex Bregman," Gustafson said. Instead, he met Bregman and made a $4,500 sale.

Gustafson said he's still unsure about where the digital market is headed. Panini has a blockchain product with online card auctions, though it has very "niche popularity," he said. The physical card with a handwritten autograph is still what excites collectors, he said, and so does buying and owning boxes of packs that go up in value as rookies from that year turn into stars.

Still, there are plenty of ways that blockchain could make even the traditional card market more efficient and trustworthy, Gustafson said. For example, there's no good way to price old and rare cards. Sellers still tend to look on eBay to see the last transaction price. Others send cards off by mail and pay to have them graded by specialty authenticators. Those processes are tedious and imperfect.

"Folks are warming up to the digital side of things because of what digital currency is doing from an investment standpoint," said Gustafson, adding that he's invested a bit in cryptocurrencies bitcoin and ethereum. "Collectors still want something physical in return."

WATCH:The rise of NFTs and why people are collecting moments and assets differently

Источник: https://www.cnbc.com/2021/04/11/baseball-cards-collides-with-nfts-and-spacs.html

How baseball card mania is colliding with NFT boom to revive Topps and change the game for dealers

On a recent family ski trip in California, my kids and I popped into an old baseball card shop in the city of Sonora, a former gold mining town in the Sierra Nevada foothills.

As a former rabid card collector, I lit up when I saw the sign for BJ's Cards and Collectibles on the town's main drag. With baseball season about to begin, I bought each of my sons, ages 5 and 8, a pack of 2021 Topps cards.

Before ringing me up, the owner, Bill Wiley, was apologetic in informing me that each pack was $5.50. That's more than a 100% markup from pre-pandemic levels. During the lockdowns, he said, the popularity of sports cards had soared and small dealers like BJ's were having to pay top dollar to distributors to get inventory. It didn't matter whether you were talking about single packs or the rarest of collectibles.

"This is the busiest since I can remember," Wiley, who opened the store with his son in 1992, said in a phone interview this week. "I closed down for nine weeks and when I reopened, there was incredible demand for sports cards."

Those $5.50 packs I bought my kids in February would now cost $7, according to Wiley, who said he's paying $148 for a box of 24 packs to make $20 in profit. At the other end of the market, a 1952 Topps Mickey Mantle rookie card sold for a record $5.2 million in January. A month later came the most expensive basketball card transaction in history — a rookie trading card of Dallas Mavericks star guard Luka Doncic was purchased for $4.6 million. And in April, a rookie Tom Brady card was bought at an auction for $2.25 million, a record for football.

Wiley, 68, said buyers today are much different than they were during the heyday of the industry in the 1990s, when collectors would come in and spend hours looking through boxes of random cards.

"A lot of these people are new to the hobby and looking at it as a form of maybe a little bit of gambling," he said.

The unforeseen revival of the sports card industry that sellers like Wiley are experiencing is colliding headfirst with two other booming trends that have captured the attention of investors: non-fungible tokens (NFTs) and special purpose acquisition companies (SPACs).

On Tuesday, Topps said it's going public through a SPAC, meaning that it's being acquired by a publicly-traded blank check company. In the announcement, the 83-year-old sports card and chewing gum company touted both the popularity of physical collectibles and its expansion into NFTs, or digital items that live on blockchain technology.

Former Disney CEO Michael Eisner, who bought Topps 14 years ago, told CNBC's "Squawk Box" that the digital business, primarily apps, is growing rapidly and that blockchain will be a big part of the future. However, he said physical cards are still driving much of the current business.

"The cardboard cards are still baseball card exchange store popular — we appeal to kids," Eisner said. "The digital cards are very popular — we appeal to teenagers and young adults. And with blockchain, we think we'll appeal to everybody."

Topps' revenue in 2020 climbed 23% to $567 million, and the company is projecting sales growth of 22% this year followed by 12% expansion in 2022. Through next year, physical goods and confections (Bazooka Gum and Ring Pops) will still make up close to 90% of revenue. In addition to its flagship baseball cards, the company sells cards for Europe's UEFA Champions League, the National Hockey League, World Wrestling Entertainment and Star Wars.

Eisner said the company had settled on the SPAC transaction based on the trajectory of the existing business, and that the blockchain "explosion came after we made this decision."

By explosion, he's referring to products like NBA Top Shot, made by league partner Dapper Labs. Consumers are paying up to hundreds of thousands of dollars for a video highlight of a LeBron James dunk or a Zion Williamson blocked shot. The clips are purchased as NFTs, which have unique codes on blockchain that certify their authenticity.

LeBron James of the Los Angeles Lakers at a game against the LA Clippers at ESPN Wide World Of Sports Complex on July 30, 2020 in Lake Buena Vista, Florida.
Mike Ehrmann

The Beckett Blog

At The National: Turning $14 into $9,000 with The Baseball Card ExchangebyChris Olds
August 7, 2010, 11:07 pm
Filed under: Donruss, Fleer, the National, Topps

How to Sell Your Baseball Cards

We buy baseball cards from 1969 and older.*

* We can buy most 1970s sports cards, especially if they are part of a larger vintage sports card collection.

* Besides some complete sets, we rarely buy cards newer than 1980, as many do not hold enough value.

While Dean's Cards specializes in vintage baseball cards, we also buy and sell vintage football cards, basketball cards, hockey cards, and non-sports cards and sets. This information applies to all vintage sports and non-sports cards, even if our examples largely relate to baseball cards.

Whether you built your sports cards collection yourself, inherited it from a relative, or even stumbled upon a box of old baseball cards in an attic, selling vintage sports cards should not be taken lightly because they are a fascinating piece of American History baseball card exchange store often hold sentimental value.  If considering selling your cards, you must first determine if they have value.  Then you must decide on a way to get the best return for not only the cards but also your time and effort.


How to Determine if Your Baseball Cards Have Value

Value can be oversimplified to two components: the rarity of the card and the popularity of the player depicted on the card.  The most important factors affecting rarity are (1) the year the baseball card was printed, (2) the card manufacturer and how many were produced, and (3) the baseball card's condition, or how new it looks.

These considerations make the value extremely situational, which is why asking about the value of a card will almost always initially warrant the answer: “it depends.”  For instance, a baseball card featuring a popular player may be worthless if easy to find (this is the case for most modern cards), and baseball cards normally bringing in a fair amount of cash might be worthless if in bad shape.  All these reasons make valuing vintage sports cards a meticulous process, so we’ll break this down it down step by step.

As an interesting side note, the most valuable baseball card by far td bank lobby hours sunday the famously rare T206 Honus Wagner (1909-1911) with only about 60 known examples. A T206 Honus Wagner baseball card recently sold for over $3 million, setting the record for the most expensive card. While this card is so rare that very few people have ever held one in their hand, here are a few of the valuable cards that actually turn up at Dean's Cards:

To learn about how much money you can expect to receive for your sports card collection, read more here: How Much Money to Expect When Selling My Baseball Cards?


STEP 1:  Identify the Baseball Cards in Your Collection

Before you can even begin to pin a value to your collection, identifying what you are working with is a crucial first step.  Trying to sell cards without knowing any details will either get you nowhere or warrant a low offer, as buyers take a risk when bidding on the unknown.  The more you know about your cards the better.

How to Determine the Print Year

The best place to start when determining the value of baseball card exchange store cards is to identify what year they were printed.  The earliest baseball cards were produced in the late 1800s, with sizable batches first printed in 1909 and the first legitimate set rolling out in 1948.  The cards holding the greatest value are typically from the 1960s, 1950s, and older. 

The easiest way to find out what year(s) your cards are from is by examining the information on the back of the card, such as by looking at the last year of reported statistics.  The stats usually provide information from a few consecutive seasons, but pay attention to the last year, i.e., the most recent year before production of the card.  For example, if you have a card that lists batting statistics from 1962, 1963, and 1964 – you can conclude that the card is from 1965, as the card was printed after the conclusion of the 1964 season but before the 1965 season.  In addition, some trading cards list the year in which the copyright was established at the very bottom on the back, which isn't the case with this example.  The copyright can also be used to identify the manufacturer, but we will get to that a little later.

Some older cards do not list off yearly statistics on the back (such as the card in the example below), so another simple way to determine the year a card was printed is to conduct a simple online search. Look for the player's name as well as the card number (turn the card to its backside and look in the upper right or left-hand corner).  Type this information into a Google search as shown below.  The search results should disclose the year and manufacturer, but we also recommend looking at the image results to make sure you identified the correct card.

The "Four Eras" of Baseball Cards

Baseball cards are generally classified into four eras.  Although the exact definitions of these eras may vary from expert to expert, you will find the Dean’s Cards parameters consistent with almost any other source of knowledge.  Since the year of a card heavily influences value, cards from certain eras are treated differently and you should adjust your expectations for financial return accordingly.  Click on these links baseball card exchange store read more about the era, or eras, in which your cards fall.

Dean’s Cards does not buy cards newer than 1980. However, some hold value. To read more, please click the link above.

Find the Manufacturer

Who printed your cards is important, as cards from the same year that are printed by different manufacturers can be valued very differently.  While the baseball card market is currently dominated by Topps (companies such as Panini print cards for other sports), various companies released sets of their own over the years.  Brands dominating the Pre-War baseball card era include Goudey and the many different tobacco, chocolate, or candy companies who included cards with their products.  Dean wrote a book covering many of these sets titled Before There Was Bubble Gum: Our Favorite Pre-World War I Baseball Cards.

Bowman came onto the scene in 1948 with the first post-war set, only to be challenged by the Topps Chewing Gum Company (known today as simply Topps) once they released their first set in 1952.  Topps and Bowman battled it out until Topps purchased Bowman after the 1955 season.  If interested in this fascinating story, check out Dean’s second book, The Bubble Gum Card War: The Great Bowman & Topps Sets from 1948 to 1955.  After the 1950s, few challenged Topps until the 1980s when the baseball card scene exploded, leading to hundreds of different sets and an oversaturated market.  Read more about this on the page about modern cards linked in the section above.

To determine the manufacturer, flip a card over to the back and look for the copyright (the same way we look for clues to indicate a card's print year.)  The copyright should say the company name, such as T.C.G. (Topps Chewing Gum).

Classify Your Baseball Cards by Set

Before submitting an appraisal form to Dean’s Cards, or trying to sell your vintage baseball cards in general, separate your cards by year and by set.  Topps printed baseball card sets, football card sets, basketball card sets, and hockey card sets, which all vary in value.  For example, your collection may consist of 1952 Topps Baseball Cards, 1953 Bowman Baseball Cards, 1953 Bowman Football Cards, and 1957 Topps Baseball Cards.  Knowing how many sports cards you have from each separate set is important.

Trading cards are generally released in sets.  Set sizes range over the years, but your typical vintage baseball card set consists of somewhere between 400-600 cards.  In the hobby, sets are used to classify and value sports cards, as cards are sold individually or in complete sets.  Due to our exclusive buying software, developed in-house, Dean’s Cards evaluates collections on a card-by-card basis, resulting in a more accurate offer.

Sometimes manufacturers release multiple types of sets in the same year.  For example, in 1964 Topps released the ‘Topps Giants’ baseball card set, that featured over-sized cards.  This was a special set that was issued in addition to the regular 1964 Topps baseball cards.  

Another famous example is Topps Traded, first issued as inserts and included in the wax packs of 1974 and 1976 Topps These insert sets featured players who were traded mid-season in their new uniforms.  Today, Topps has expanded the idea to exclude rookies and issues an Update set towards the end of the season.

The cards in these secondary sets often look somewhat similar to those in their corresponding main sets, but the designs are noticeably different.  If you have trouble identifying cards in your collection, keep in mind that you may be looking at items from one of these various obscure sets printed over the years.  This does not mean these cards are not worth anything, but they are valued completely differently than the mainstream sets.

Beyond Baseball – Other Trading Cards

Of the cards printed before 1970, about 80% were baseball cards.  However, we also buy and sell Football cards, Basketball cards, Hockey cards, and Non-Sports cards, all popular in their own right.  If your collection consists of cards for multiple sports, separate these and count how many you blackberry key2 le t mobile of each.

Click the following links to find out more about selling a specific type of sports card other than baseball:

Non-sports cards can be hard to identify, as many obscure sets were produced with a wide range of themes.  However, searching the card name and number will most likely help you identify these sets.  Some of the most sought-after Non-Sports Sets in the hobby include 1938 Horrors of War, 1956 Davy Crockett (based on scenes in the motion picture) with Orange or Green back, 1962 Mars Attacks, 1962 Civil War News, and 1977 Star Wars.


STEP 2:  Consider Player Popularity and Rarity

The player(s) depicted on a card can make or break value.  Especially as Topps increased their set sizes throughout the 60s and 70s, players did not have to be good or popular to get on a card.  Most cards in each set depict entirely ordinary players, even some of who went on to barely play in the major leagues.  This is what makes finding a great player so much fun, whether in a wax pack in 1957 or in a shoebox today.  If Topps only printed cards of the best players then kids would not have experienced the excitement of ripping open packs of cards, hoping to find a gem. 

Star Cards

Baseball Cards with containing the image of the game's stars, and especially players who eventually were inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame, have more value than the cards featuring common players.  Rookie cards for Hall-of-Famers are typically the most valuable baseball cards in a given set.  

The sports cards featuring the ordinary (non-star) players are referred to as ‘commons’.  While cards depicting Hall of Fame players are almost always more valuable than the common cards in the set,  there are dozens of Hall-of-Famers in each vintage sports card set.

Pulling aside the star players is a good start to evaluating your collection, as they are the most important cards to value.  When placing a bid on a collection, Dean’s Cards focuses on these items since they make or break the final offer.  If you do not know a lot about baseball this step may be difficult, but you can use our website as a reference to find the Hall of Fame players for each set.  Products featuring these players are labeled HALL-OF-FAME in the Dean’s Cards inventory.  You can check the ‘Hall of Fame’ box at the top of a page for a certain year to only see products labeled as such.  This applies to cards of all sports, not just baseball.

Vintage baseball cards featuring future Hall-of-Fame players, such as Lou Gehrig, Babe Ruth, Cy Young, Ty Cobb, Mickey Mantle, Hank Aaron, Roberto Clemente, Stan Musial, Willie Mays, Nolan Ryan, and Ted Williams will almost always have some sort of value, even when found in below average conditions.  The same goes for Vintage Football Cards features Hall-of-Famers, such as Joe Namath, Jim Brown, Bart Starr, Walter Payton, Gale Sayers, Fred Biletnikoff, and Johnny Unitas.  As for Basketball cards and Hockey cards, depicting Hall-of-Fame players such as Wilt Chamberlain, Michael Jordan, Bill Russell, Jerry West, Gordie Howe, Wayne Gretzky, and Bobby Orr have seen their value increase over the years.  These are just a few well-known examples out of hundreds.

Rookie Cards

A player’s rookie card is their first ever card, sometimes printed before their first professional season.  One notable varation to this rule is the 1952 Topps Mickey Mantle, which is considered as his Topps rookie card even though ‘The Mick’ was first pictured in 1951 Bowman.  Both cards are some of the most valuable in the hobby, but the 1952 Topps version is worth much more since it is Mantle’s first appearance in a Topps set and was short-printed.  As noted above, rookie cards of Hall-of-Fame players are generally the most valuable in a set.  Other popular rookie baseball cards include 1951 Bowman Willie Mays, 1954 Topps Hank Aaron, 1955 Topps Sandy Koufax, and 1963 Topps Pete Rose.  Although not quite as electric as baseball rookies, popular examples from other sports include 1957 Topps Johnny Unitas, 1986-1987 Fleer Michael Jordan, 1969-1970 Topps Lew Alcindor (Kareem Abdul-Jabbar), and 1979-1980 O-Pee-Chee Wayne Gretzky.

Rare Cards - Short Prints and Variations

While not necessarily relating to player popularity, short-printed cards (fewer were printed than the rest of the set) and variations cards can be some of the most valuable in a set.  One of the most famous short-printed baseball cards is the 1954 Bowman #66 Ted Williams, as Bowman was forced to pull Williams off the set early into production when it was discovered that the slugger signed an exclusive contract with Topps.  The slot on the print sheet for card #66 was replaced by Jimmy Piersall, who also had another card in the set, making the Williams variation of card #66 much rarer.  

More traditional instances of card variations involve a card being released with two different font colors or player images, one scarcer than the other.  A more interesting example is 1969 Topps #151 Clay Dalrymple.  The remarkably ordinary Dalrymple baseball card exchange store the calendar year with the Phillies but was traded to the Orioles in January.  Topps initially printed card #151 with a picture of the catcher in a Phillies uniform.  Topps quickly corrected the mistake, substituting in a hatless headshot of Dalrymple (with no Phillies logo visible) and changing the team name to the Orioles.  The latter variation was printed in larger numbers and is considered the 'common variation’ of card #151, while the Phillies version is the ‘rare variation’.

1952 Topps Mickey MantleA beautiful example of the 1952 Topps Mickey Mantle (image courtesy of Goodwin & Co.)

STEP 3:  Evaluate the Condition of Your Vintage Sports Cards

Condition is probably the single biggest factor which affects the value of vintage cards.  Some sellers assume that all old cards must be extremely valuable no matter their condition; these folks are disappointed to receive underwhelming bids for beat up cards. 

Grading Vintage Cards

Professional Sports Authentication (PSA) is regarded as the grading expert in the hobby, and their grading scale rates cards from 1 (Poor) to 10 (Gem Mint).  At Dean’s Cards, we evaluate cards on the same scale but keep Near Mint/Mint (8) as our highest grade.  Deciphering whether a card is an 8, 9, or 10 can be highly subjective, as cards of these grades look nearly the same. 

Casual sellers are garnier skin active bb cream medium deep at all expected to grade the cards in their collection, but obtaining a basic understanding of your collection's condition makes you a more educated seller and helps set realistic expectations for a return value.  Since today’s cards are printed on higher quality material and people take better care of them, modern cards are expected to be in nearly perfect shape so their condition is generally a nonfactor.  The exception to this generalization is valuable modern rookie cards, as the prices vary dramatically amongst professionally graded 8’s, 9’s, and 10’s.

Our Grading Scale

Our standards lie at the upper end of the hobby, for we are known as conservative graders.  We set our standards high to ensure that our customers receive the best and are never disappointed.  Our cards come with their grades stuck on the back-side of their sleeves, and full scans of EVERY single vintage card in the Dean’s Cards inventory are available to the public eye, so what you see is what you get.

For more information, check out this page dedicated entirely to this topic:Dean’s Detailed Guide and Standards on Grading Sports Cards

Should I Have My Sports Cards Professionally Graded?

Many people looking to sell their collections are told that getting their cards professionally graded makes them more valuable.  While this is sometimes true for rare and expensive cards, sending a bunch of mid-grade common cards (featuring ordinary players) to PSA is not worth the expense.  With the expensive shipping and insurance fees the cost is routinely $14 - $17 per common card, and much more for stars.  At Dean’s Cards, we do not usually advise getting a card graded unless it is old, in great condition, or a star card (depending on the year).  We often see people that inherited collections spend far more on grading fees than the collection is actually worth.  The key is knowing which cards to submit for grading.  Dean says that if a card has a high value it's because of the card, not the graded case it's in!  Usually, the safer and more profitable move is to sell your cards ungraded.

For more information, check out this page dedicated entirely to this topic:Should I Get My Baseball Cards Graded by PSA?


Now that you’ve valued your collection, you can accurately assess if you’re willing to part with your cards based on the estimated return.  As Dean always says, the bottom line is that this is your collection and you do not have to sell it, especially if you are still emotionally attached.  If you have not looked at your cards in years then it may make sense to sell them and use the money for something useful.  Many collectors never sell their collections until there is a special event which encourages them to do so, such as a wedding, sending a kid to college, or paying off bills.  However, it is often the family members who inherited the cards which end up selling them.

What if I am Just Not Ready to Let Go?

If you are not to the point where you can emotionally part with your boyhood memories then my advice is not to sell.  Especially if you do not have any ideas for how to use the money, as you would probably be better off letting your cards continue to accrue value over time rather than putting your returns in a savings account with almost no interest.  Many collectors keep the cards until they die and let their heirs worry about what to do with the collection.  We certainly understand a man’s attachment to a boyhood sports card collection.

That being said, refusing to sell your collection simply because you’re banking on their value increasing is not necessarily a safe bet.  After all, that is what everyone said about internet stock a few years ago and we all know how that played out. 

For more information, check out this page dedicated entirely to this topic:When NOT to Sell Your Baseball Card Collection

Where and How Should I Sell My Old Baseball Cards?

After deciding you want to sell your collection, the process is not over.  You must decide where and how, as this is ultimately the most important part.  Trying to sell them on your own requires hours and hours of work, and does not guarantee you sell them at all.  The most painless way to sell your collection is through Dean’s Cards. We make the process quick and offer much more than other vendors.  However, not all cards fall within our specific interest. In that case, there are alternatives to selling to Dean’s Cards but require more effort with the risk of being ripped off. Dealers and vendors often give lowball offers on collections when they are unsure of the current market value. This is never the case when selling to Dean’s Cards, as our purchasing software generates a fair price based on what each item sells for. This eliminates the need for negotiation and haggling which was commonplace in pre-internet card transactions.

Selling to the Local Sports Card Shop

People baseball card exchange store to ask why they shouldn’t sell their cards to the local sports card store.  Today, most of these shops are gone, due to efficiency. cost-effectiveness and ease of buying baseball cards online.  This article written by Dean around 2003 is still interesting: Should I Sell My Baseball Cards to the Neighborhood Card Store?

Should I Sell My Sports Cards Myself on eBay?

Many people wonder why they shouldn’t sell their cards themselves on eBay, and the answer is quite simple: it’s not nearly as easy as you blue ridge bank and trust co raytown mo imagine.  Many of the card sellers on eBay are actual professionals, or at least part-time, who have dedicated years to mastering the online marketplace.  A few years ago, Dean made a list of the 21 steps Dean’s Cards takes to buy and sell a single baseball card.  Our procedures have changed since then, but this list (available in the ‘Selling Your Baseball Cards on eBay’ link) provides a good idea for the large workload of selling cards online.

Selling your cards on eBay can bring you a higher return through diligent work, but this is not always the case.  First-time sellers on eBay are not able to get a large return as it takes years to slowly build up enough credibility and feedback to sell for top prices.  Even experienced amateur eBay sellers cannot sell for the prices that Dean’s Cards can.  Also, keep in mind that our revenues because of the added value of convenience, selection, security and customer service that we can provide with our professional staff and award-winning website.  Dean's Cards has an 8,500 square foot office, an inventory of over one million cards, and a website running numerous custom-made and technologically advanced programs.  Our tough grading, quality insurance, and great service make this worthwhile, but it’s taken Dean decades to perfect the process.

All in all, we may encourage some sellers to turn to eBay if they are both knowledgeable about vintage cards and e-commerce, but generally, we say that Dean’s Cards will take care of you best.  You can count on us to offer you our best price upfront when we bid on your sports card collection.  We do everything we can to eliminate the hassles, confusion, and stress of selling a baseball card collection.

For more information, check out this page dedicated entirely to this topic:Selling Your Baseball Cards on eBay


The bottom line is that Dean's Cards sells thousands of cards every week. This means WE ALWAYS NEED CARDS and pay "top dollar" for collections. Based on the customer feedback that we receive, we pay more for cards than other dealers. We would appreciate the opportunity to bid on your collection (click here to see the seller testimonials for yourself).

Back in the day, selling at cards shows or card shops was a hassle, as you often had to drive several hours with your collection only to end up negotiating with dealers without a clear idea of what they need.  Dean's Cards keeps the process simple and straight forward.  You mail us your collection, our custom-made bid software generates an offer based on current market prices and availability, and we send you our best offer up front.  If you don't like our offer we will send it back, but sellers end up accepting our bid over 80% of time.

We do everything we can to eliminate the hassles, confusion, and stress of selling a baseball card collection.  Since purchasing private collections of vintage sports cards is our primary source of inventory replenishment, we take all steps necessary to make sure that every client that decides to sell their collection to us feels as though they have been treated fairly.

For details on the process and regarding what cards we are looking for, click on the 'Selling Your Baseball Cards to Dean' link below this paragraph.  After reading this page, if you have further questions or concerns regarding the sale of your vintage sports card collection, please do not hesitate to contact us.  A member of our Purchasing Department (click here to meet the buying team) would be happy to address your questions and concerns.  Please send an email to [email protected], or give us a call at (513) 898-0651.

For more information, check out this page dedicated entirely to this topic:Selling Your Baseball Cards to Dean's Cards

Источник: https://www.deanscards.com/sell-your-baseball-cards

Vintage Baseball card exchange store Card Stores

Yes, some collectors still like to do business in person!  So we’ve assembled a collection of the best sports card stores that sell a large assortment of vintage cards. 

This list is based on my research and experience so if you have a store that’s not listed, please shoot me an email at [email protected] 

Please ensure they sell vintage cards and provide some notes if possible as to what sorts of cards they specialize in. 

This list will be frequently updated.  Feel free to drop a comment below baseball card exchange store any of these stores or other vintage shops.

Cavalier Cards – Charlottesville, Virginia
If heading there, make sure the owner Jeff is there, he has a binder and other vintage for sale. 

Burbank Sports Cards – Burbank, California
Lot of vintage cards, also has online eBay store under the same name

Stevens Creek Sportscards – San Jose, California
Good assortment of vintage, ask for Kevin…. they also have an eBay store under the same name.

Sports Heroes – Cranston, Rhode Island
Sells single cards from all four major sports from the 1950s to the present

Baseball Card Exchange – Schererville, Indiana
These guys are the kings of unopened wax, so if you’re looking for any older wax this is the place to visit.

Kenmore Collectibles – Boston, Massachusetts
Has an extensive inventory of older vintage post- and pre-war cards

The Battersbox – Tomball, Texas 
Specializes in everything vintage and has been around for a while, since 1990

DJ’s Sports Cards – Renton, Washington
Great mix of new and vintage, gets great reviews from customers

Mike’s Stadium Sports Cards – Aurora, Colorado
Hosts trade nights, has lots of giveaways, and lots of vintage and pre-war cards for sale

Dugout Dreams – Danbury, Connecticut
Lots of vintage cards, from pre-war up until the 1970’s

Bases Loaded Sports Collectibles – Buffalo, New York
Awesome owners here, super friendly with a great assortment of vintage cards

Источник: https://allvintagecards.com/vintage-baseball-card-stores/

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