keira knightley pirates of the caribbean at worlds end

In an increasingly shaky alliance, Will Turner (Orlando Bloom), Elizabeth Swann (Keira Knightley) and Captain Barbossa (Geoffrey Rush) begin a desperate quest. - for intense sequences of action/adventure violence and some frightening images. Director: Gore Verbinski Starring: Johnny Depp, Orlando Bloom, Keira Knightley. Things open in Singapore, where resurrected Captain Barbossa (Geoffrey Rush), Elizabeth Swann (Keira Knightley), and their nigh-untrackable lot.

Keira knightley pirates of the caribbean at worlds end -

BURBANK, California — When last we saw the Pirates of the Caribbean, things weren't looking too good. Captain Jack Sparrow had been swallowed whole by a giant sea monster, Will Turner and Elizabeth Swann's romance was on the rocks, and the evil Captain Barbossa had once again risen from the dead.

But judging from a stunning visit to the set of the third movie, "At World's End," things are about to start looking much, much better (see "Keira Knightley Could Tell You About 'Pirates 3,' But She'd Have To Kill You"). "I think you'll notice right away that we're not in the Caribbean any longer," Rick Heinrichs, the production designer for all three movies, beamed last year from the set, which doubled for Singapore. "We're on the other side of the world."

"Welcome to Singapore!" chimed in visual-effects supervisor John Knoll, looking over the small fishing town of cobblestone roads, precarious bridges and wares-selling huts. "This is a set that we spent two-and-a-half months building."

The wicker-and-water set is the primary location for "World's End," which sails into theaters May 25. In the film, the pirates travel to Singapore in their quest to find the literal end of the world, save Captain Jack and reclaim the Black Pearl. First, however, they'll need to grapple with Captain Sao Feng (Chow Yun-Fat), the Pirate Lord of Singapore.

"It was a lot of fun for us to research and come up with a new way of telling the story of pirates and what a pirate looks like in 1720s Singapore," Heinrichs said. "There's not much documentation about it. It's different shrubberies, Chinese and southeast Asian architecture, and so we came up with this Chinese/Malaysian mélange."

"Although we didn't have a direct reference from Singapore in the early part of the 18th century, we did have other stuff from the 19th century, the early 1800s, photographic-type research," Knoll added. "Singapore, anyway, is kind of at a crossroads in Southeast Asia, with many different cultural references. So we have Indonesian, Malaysian and Chinese — it's a melting pot."

But when most people think pirates, they imagine peg legs, parrots and pointy hats — not rainforests, roundhouse kicks and sticky rice. It goes without saying, then, that the new locale will result in a decidedly different pirate tale.

"This set is designed for an action scene right here, when all heck breaks loose," Knoll grinned like a proud papa, looking at the 3-foot-deep water and the narrow bridges hanging over it. "The Chinese pirates, our pirates, and the East India Trading Company troops all converge and fight, and people fall in the water and things get blown up."

Looking over at a small shanty, he added: "That's a fireworks hut right there, so I don't even need to tell you what happens to that."

The set was reinforced more than any of Knoll and Heinrichs' previous "Pirates" structures, in order to contain the quasi-kung-fu fighting that breaks out when all these enemies engage in their 17th-century Mexican standoff.

"We're not doing the Hong Kong high-wire stuff," Heinrichs cautioned. "There's no 'Crouching Tiger,' but we have a lot of Chinese influence in there ... that dictated how the sets were built. ... Our sets were built to withstand quite a bit of violence."

Once the sets were constructed, the stars came to play. On the afternoon we visited, director's chairs could be seen for all the major stars except Depp; Keira Knightley and Chow-Yun Fat shot scenes in a closed-off "bathhouse" just a few feet away. But, according to Heinrichs, even the on-set A-listers had stars in their eyes when a rock legend showed up to film his cameo.

"Everybody wanted to meet Keith Richards," he remembered. "But there was a policy thing. It would have been a big distraction. Still, everybody was trying to walk past his trailer, and I actually got to shake his hand — the guy is such an icon."

Heinrichs didn't get to speak with the Rolling Stones guitarist, but he said that's just as well — because he wouldn't know how to begin the conversation. "I wouldn't really know what to say to him," he shrugged. "When you actually meet a hero, it's a little difficult to just say, 'How's it going there, Keith?' "

The production designer was thrilled to create several "period" guitars for Richards to play (including one with a sea turtle's shell) and said that the crew was in awe while watching Johnny Depp and his "dad" play pirates.

"They're very talented, these pirates," Heinrichs grinned.

Check out everything we've got on "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End."

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Источник: http://www.mtv.com/news/1558319/pirates-of-singapore-details-from-un-caribbean-at-worlds-end-set/

Review: Pirates Of The Caribbean: At World’s End

entertainment

With Pirates 3, director Gore Verbinski lurches menacingly towards the same mes(s)merised schlock as Pirates 2, writes Vinayak Chakravarty.

Updated on Jun 02, 2007 01:30 PM IST

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Why Keira Knightley Probably Won't Appear In Another Pirates Of The Caribbean Movie

Keira Knightley's Elizabeth Swann was an integral part of the first three films in Disney's Pirates of the Caribbean series. The actress reprised the role for a cameo in last year's Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales, but the franchise has generally moved beyond Keira Knightley and co-star Orlando Bloom and has largely suffered for it, as the focus has been entirely on Johnny Depp's Captain Jack Sparrow. Yet, despite the creative decline, these films still make money, especially overseas, so a sixth entry is likely inevitable. But if there is another Pirates of the Caribbean movie, don't expect Keira Knightley to be a part of it because she simply doesn't want to commit the time.

Even though she made a brief return to the series in Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales, Keira Knightley does not expect to set sail for the high seas again as a part of the franchise. According to the Los Angeles Times, her reasoning is that the films simply take too long to shoot. The Pirates of the Caribbean films take five or more months of principal photography, which is considerably longer than a film that isn't on that blockbuster scale would take. Keira Knightley is a mother now, and blockbuster films like the Pirates series take a long time to shoot, so that probably factors into how much time she wants to commit to one specific project, especially one that she's done before multiple times.

Keira Knightley is also a prolific actress, and perhaps she prefers taking on lots of roles and creative challenges with shorter productions instead of having to pass up on parts because she's spending too much time shooting the next Pirates of the Caribbean film. It's understandable, even if it is a bummer for fans of her character that went from damsel in distress to badass pirate king over the course of the series.

Despite the fact that the last Pirates film suffered a $250 million drop from Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides, it does seem likely that a sequel will come at some point given the power of the brand and the fact that the last film still earned $795 million worldwide. I think fans might like Keira Knightley to be a part of it, if only because she was back when this franchise was performing stronger critically, but it seems that Elizabeth Swann will not be returning to right the ship. That said, there are directions that a sixth film could go in to try and reinvigorate and reinvent the franchise.

Keira Knightley may be done with Pirates of the Caribbean, but she isn't done with Disney. The actress will be seen later this year, in a perfect bit of casting, as the Sugar Plum Fairy in The Nutcracker and the Four Realms. Before that though, you can see her in Colette, which is now in limited release. Check out our premiere guide for all the biggest movies still to come this year.

Nick grew up in Maryland has degrees in Film Studies and Communications. His life goal is to walk the earth, meet people and get into adventures. He’s also still looking for The Adventures of Pete and Pete season 3 on DVD if anyone has a lead.

Источник: https://www.cinemablend.com/news/2458068/why-keira-knightley-probably-wont-appear-in-another-pirates-of-the-caribbean-movie

Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End

2007 fantasy film directed by Gore Verbinski

This article is about the film. For the video game, see Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End (video game). For the soundtrack, see Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End (soundtrack).

Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End is a 2007 American epicfantasyswashbuckler film directed by Gore Verbinski, the third installment in the Pirates of the Caribbean film series and the sequel to Dead Man's Chest (2006). It follows Will Turner, Elizabeth Swann, Hector Barbossa, and the crew of the Black Pearl as they seek to rescue Captain Jack Sparrow from Davy Jones' Locker. They then prepare to fight the East India Trading Company, led by Cutler Beckett, who controls Davy Jones and plans to extinguish piracy forever.

Two sequels to Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl were conceived in 2004, with Elliott and Rossio developing a story arc that would span both films. The film was shot in two shoots during 2005 and 2006, the former of which was released as Dead Man's Chest. This also marks the final film of the series to be directed by Verbinski. With a production budget of nearly US$ 300 million, it was, at time of production, the most expensive film ever made.

Walt Disney Pictures released the film in the United States on May 25, 2007. Critical reviews were mixed; the film was praised for its performances, direction, musical score, action scenes, humor and special effects, but was criticized for its plot, character development and long running time of 168 minutes. Despite this, At World's End was the highest-grossing film of 2007, bringing in over $960 million. It was nominated at the 80th Academy Awards for Best Makeup and Best Visual Effects. It won favourite movie actor for Johnny Depp in 2008 Kids' Choice Awards. A sequel, On Stranger Tides, was released May 20, 2011.

Plot[edit]

To control the oceans, Lord Cutler Beckett executes anyone associated with piracy in Port Royal and orders Davy Jones to destroy all pirate ships. Condemned prisoners sing "Hoist the Colours" to compel the nine Pirate Lords to convene at Shipwreck Cove to hold the Brethren Court. Because Captain Jack Sparrow, Pirate Lord of the Caribbean Sea, never named a successor before being dragged to Davy Jones' Locker, Hector Barbossa, Will Turner, Elizabeth Swann, Tia Dalma, and the surviving crew of the Black Pearl consisting of Marty, Cotton, Pintel, Ragetti, and Joshamee Gibbs plot to rescue Jack. In Singapore, the crew meet Captain Sao Feng, Pirate Lord of the South China Sea, who owns navigational charts to the Locker. Will secretly promises to give Jack to Feng in return for the Pearl, intending to use it to rescue his father Bootstrap Bill Turner from the Flying Dutchman.

The crew rescues Jack and recover the Pearl. As they depart, they encounter boats of dead souls, including Elizabeth's father Governor Swann, executed by Beckett. Tia Dalma reveals that the goddess Calypso charged Davy Jones with guiding the souls of those who died at sea to the next world. Every ten years he could come ashore to be with the woman he loved. Jones corrupted his purpose and was cursed to become a monster. The soul of Governor Swann reveals that whoever kills Jones, by stabbing his disembodied heart, must become the Dutchman's captain.

Returning to the living world, the Pearl stops at an island for fresh water. They are attacked by Sao Feng and Beckett's men. Jack secretly promises to make sure the pirate coven goes to battle against Beckett in exchange for his freedom. Elizabeth is handed over to Feng, who believes she is Calypso, while the rest of the crew make for Shipwreck Cove aboard the Pearl. Jack throws Will off the ship as part of a plan to seize control of the Dutchman. Sao Feng tells Elizabeth that the first Brethren Court bound Calypso in human form after she betrayed her lover, Davy Jones. Feng plans to release her to defeat Beckett. Jones attacks Feng's ship. Feng appoints Elizabeth his successor as Pirate Lord before dying.

Elizabeth and the crew are locked in the brig of the Dutchman, where she finds Bootstrap Bill losing himself to the Dutchman's curse. He tells her that Will must not come; by killing Jones he will bind himself to the ship. Admiral James Norrington frees Elizabeth and her crew from the Dutchman, but is killed by a crazed Bootstrap Bill.

The Pearl arrives at Shipwreck Cove, where Barbossa attempts to persuade the Brethren Court to release Calypso. Davy Jones visits Tia Dalma in the Pearl's brig, revealing she is Calypso. Jack's father Captain Teague, Keeper of the Pirate Code, informs the Court that only an elected Pirate King can declare war. To avoid a stalemate, Jack votes for Elizabeth, making her King. Elizabeth, Jack, Barbossa, Beckett, Jones, and Will parley, trading Will for Jack. Barbossa frees Calypso, but when Will reveals it was Jones who enabled the first Court to imprison her, Calypso vanishes and summons a maelstrom.

The Pearl and Dutchman battle in the maelstrom. Elizabeth and Will are wed by Barbossa. On the Dutchman, Jack and Jones duel for control of Jones' heart. Jones stabs Will, mortally wounding him. Jack helps Will stab the heart, killing Jones, whose body falls into the maelstrom. Jack and Elizabeth escape the Dutchman as it sinks into the maelstrom.

As Beckett's ship, the Endeavour, engages the Pearl, the Dutchman rises from the sea captained by Will; the crew has been freed from Jones' curse. The two pirate ships destroy the Endeavour. A stunned Beckett goes down with his ship while his navy retreats. With Will bound to guide souls lost at sea to the next world, he and Elizabeth bid farewell to each other. Will departs on the Dutchman, leaving Elizabeth pregnant and with the chest containing his heart.

Jack and Joshamee Gibbs discover Barbossa stole the Pearl again, but Jack stole Feng's charts prior after anticipating this. He departs from Tortuga to track down the Fountain of Youth.

In a post-credits scene set ten years later, Elizabeth and her son Henry watch Will return aboard the Dutchman.

Cast[edit]

Main articles: List of Pirates of the Caribbean cast members and characters

  • Johnny Depp as Captain Jack Sparrow: Sparrow and the Black Pearl have been dragged to Davy Jones' Locker by the Kraken; he is trapped there until his former crew mounts a rescue party. He is the Pirate Lord of the Caribbean Sea.
  • Geoffrey Rush as Hector Barbossa: Once first mate of the Black Pearl under Jack's command before leading a mutiny, Barbossa has been resurrected by Tia Dalma to captain the rescue of Jack Sparrow. He was also needed for his "piece of eight" to free Calypso. Rush said that in the film, Barbossa becomes more of a cunning politician.[3] He is the Pirate Lord of the Caspian Sea.
  • Orlando Bloom as Will Turner: A young blacksmith-turned-pirate, the son of "Bootstrap Bill" Turner, and later the husband of Elizabeth Swann. Turner becomes Captain of The Flying Dutchman after the ritual is performed to save his life.
  • Keira Knightley as Elizabeth Swann: Governor Swann's daughter and Will Turner's fiancée. Having tricked Jack Sparrow into being swallowed by the Kraken to save herself and the Black Pearl crew, she subsequently goes to his rescue. Swann becomes Captain of The Empress and Pirate Lord of the South China Seas as successor to Feng, and becomes the Pirate King by default as a result of the Bretheren Court vote.
  • Bill Nighy as Davy Jones: Malevolent ruler of the ocean realm, Captain of The Flying Dutchman. With his heart captured by James Norrington, he is now enslaved to Cutler Beckett who commanded him to kill the Kraken ("your pet"), and now serves the East India Trading Company, though he remains volatile and makes life difficult for the soldiers policing him.
  • Tom Hollander as Cutler Beckett: A powerful chairman of the East India Trading Company and now armed with a mandate from the King and in possession of Davy Jones' heart, Beckett attempts to control the world's oceans for the sake of sustainable business—and to end piracy.
  • Kevin R. McNally as Joshamee Gibbs: Jack's loyal, if superstitious, first mate.
  • Jack Davenport as James Norrington: Promoted to the rank of admiral in return for giving Beckett Jones' heart, he has allied himself with Beckett and the Company, although he still cares for Elizabeth, his former fiancée, and finds himself torn between his duty and his growing dislike for Beckett.
  • Jonathan Pryce as Weatherby Swann: Governor of Port Royal and father to Elizabeth Swann, he is now trapped in Beckett's service.
  • Naomie Harris as Tia Dalma/Calypso: An obeah witch who travels with the Black Pearl crew to rescue Jack; she also raised Barbossa from the dead at the conclusion of Dead Man's Chest and has a mysterious past connection to Davy Jones.
  • Lee Arenberg and Mackenzie Crook as Pintel and Ragetti: A mischievous and eccentric duo, part of Jack's crew.
  • Stellan Skarsgård as Bootstrap Bill Turner: Will's father, cursed to serve an eternity aboard Davy Jones' ship The Flying Dutchman. As he slowly loses hope, he also loses his humanity to the ship, and becomes mentally confused, barely recognizing his own son in the second half of the film.
  • Chow Yun-fat as Sao Feng: Pirate Lord of the South China Sea, he captains the Chinese ship The Empress and has a poor history with Sparrow. He is reluctant to aid in his rescue from Davy Jones' Locker. "Sao Feng" (嘯風) means "Howling Wind" in Chinese. Chow was confirmed to be playing Feng in July 2005 while production of the second film was on hiatus.[4] Chow relished playing the role, even helping out crew members with props.[5]
  • David Bailie as Cotton: Jack's loyal mute crewman who returns again to join the quest to bring back Sparrow.
  • Martin Klebba as Marty: Jack's dwarf crewman who also joins the quest to bring back Sparrow.
  • David Schofield as Mr. Mercer: Lord Beckett's henchman, assigned to hold Davy Jones' leash aboard the Dutchman.
  • Keith Richards as Edward Teague: Pirate Lord of Madagascar, Keeper of the Pirata Codex for the Brethren Court and Jack Sparrow's father. The other pirate lords are visibly terrified of him. Richards, who partially inspired Depp's portrayal of Sparrow,[6] was meant to appear in Dead Man's Chest, but there was no room for him in the story,[7] as well as his being tied up with a Rolling Stones tour. He almost missed filming a scene in At World's End, following injuries sustained by falling out of a tree.[8] In June 2006, Verbinski finally managed to make room in Richards' schedule to shoot that September.[9]
  • Greg Ellis as Theodore Groves: The second-in-command to Lord Beckett.
  • Lauren Maher and Vanessa Branch as Scarlett and Giselle
  • Angus Barnett and Giles New as Mullroy and Murtogg
  • Reggie Lee as Tai Huang
  • Ghassan Massoud as Captain Ammand, the Pirate Lord of the Black Sea
  • Marcel Iureș as Capitaine Chevalle, the Pirate Lord of the Mediterranean Sea
  • Sergio Calderón as Captain Eduardo Villanueva, Pirate Lord of the Adriatic Sea
  • Takayo Fischer as Mistress Ching, the Pirate Lord of the Pacific Ocean
  • Hakeem Kae-Kazim as Captain Jocard, the Pirate Lord of the Atlantic Ocean
  • Marshall Manesh as Sri Sumbhajee Angria, Pirate Lord of the Indian Ocean
  • Dominic Scott Kay as Young Henry Turner: the son of Will Turner and Elizabeth Swann. Scott Kay was credited as Young William Turner, and was retroactively named Young Henry Turner following the release of Dead Men Tell No Tales.

Production[edit]

Development[edit]

See also: Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest – Production

"I felt it important that the third film was the end of an era — like in a postmodernwestern where the railroad comes and the gunfighter is extinct. It seemed that we had an opportunity to take a look at a world where the legitimate has become corrupt and there is no place for honest thieves in that society, so you have darker issues and a little melancholy. The myths are dying. That seemed a great theme with which to complete the trilogy."

—Gore Verbinski[10]

Following The Curse of the Black Pearl's success in 2003, the cast and crew signed on for two sequels to be shot back-to-back.[11] For the third film, director Gore Verbinski wanted to return the tone to that of a character piece after using the second film to keep the plot moving.[5] Inspired by the real-life confederation of pirates, Elliott and Rossio looked at historical figures and created fictional characters from them to expand the scope beyond the main cast.[12] Finally embellishing their mythology, Calypso was introduced, going full circle to Barbossa's mention of "heathen gods" that created the curse in the first film.[13]

Filming[edit]

Parts of the third film were shot during location filming of Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest, a long shoot which finished on March 1, 2006.[14] During August 2005, the Singapore sequence was shot. The set was built on Stage 12 of the Universal Studios backlot, and comprised 40 structures within an 80 by 130-foot (24 by 40-m) tank that was 3+1⁄2 feet (1.1 m) deep. As 18th century Singapore is not a well-documented era, the filmmakers chose to use an Expressionist style based on Chinese and Malaysian cities of the same period. The design of the city was also intended by Verbinski to parody spa culture, with fungi growing throughout the set. Continuing this natural feel, the floorboards of Sao Feng's bathhouse had to be cut by hand, and real humidity was created by the combination of gallons of water and the lighting equipment on the set.[15]

Filming resumed on August 3, 2006, at the Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah[16] for 70 days off the California coast, as all the shooting required in the Caribbean had been conducted in 2005.[17]Davy Jones' Locker was shot at Utah, and it was shot in a monochromatic way to represent its different feeling from the usual colorful environment of a pirate.[18] The climactic battle was shot in a former air hangar at Palmdale, California,[19] where the cast had to wear wetsuits underneath their costumes on angle-tipped ships. The water-drenched set was kept in freezing temperatures, to make sure bacteria did not come inside and infect the crew.[20] A second unit was shot at Niagara Falls.[21]Industrial Light & Magic did 750 effects shots, while Digital Domain also took on 300. They spent just five months finishing the special effects. The film posed numerous challenges in creating water-based effects.[22]

Filming finished on December 12, 2006, in Molokai,[23] and the first assembly cut was three hours.[24] Twenty minutes were removed, not including end credits, though producer Jerry Bruckheimer maintained that the long running time was needed to make the final battle work in terms of build-up.[25]

Music[edit]

Hans Zimmer composed the score, as he did for the previous films, and wrote the music for The Simpsons Movie at the same time. Zimmer composed eight new motifs, including a new love theme for the At World's End soundtrack.[23] He scored scenes as the editors began work, so as to influence their choice of cutting to the music. Gore Verbinski helped on the score. He played the Ennio Morricone-influenced guitar music in the parley scene between Barbossa, Sparrow, Elizabeth and Will, Davy Jones, and Cutler Beckett.[26] He also co-wrote the song "Hoist the Colours" with Zimmer.[27]

Marketing[edit]

After a muted publicity campaign, the trailer finally debuted at ShoWest 2007.[28] It was shown on March 18, 2007, at a special screening of Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl named "Pirates Ultimate Fan Event", and was then shown on March 19 during Dancing with the Stars, before it debuted online.[29] Action figures by NECA were released in late April.[30]Board games such as a Collector's Edition Chess Set, a Monopoly Game, and a Pirates Dice Game (Liar's Dice) were also released. Master Replicas made sculptures of characters and replicas of jewellery and the Dead Man's Chest.[31] A video game with the same title as the film was released on May 22, 2007, on Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, Wii, PSP, PlayStation 2, PC, and Nintendo DS formats.[32]The soundtrack and its remix were also released on May 22.

Release[edit]

Theatrical[edit]

The world premiere of At World's End was held on May 19, 2007, at Disneyland, home of the ride that inspired the film and where the first two films in the trilogy debuted. Disneyland offered the general public a chance to attend the premiere through the sale of tickets, priced at $1,500 per ticket, with proceeds going to the Make-a-Wish Foundation charity.[33] Just a few weeks before the film's release, Walt Disney Pictures decided to move the United States opening of At World's End from screenings Friday, May 25, 2007, to Thursday at 8 pm, May 24, 2007.[34] The film opened in 4,362 theaters domestically, beating Spider-Man 3's theater opening record by 110 (this record was surpassed by The Dark Knight the following year).[35][36]

Censorship[edit]

At least one nation's official censors ordered scenes cut from the film. According to Xinhua, the state news agency of the People's Republic of China, ten minutes of footage containing Chow Yun-fat's portrayal of Singaporean pirate Sao Feng were trimmed from versions of the film which may be shown in China. Chow is onscreen for twenty minutes in the uncensored theatrical release of the film. No official reason for the censorship was given, but unofficial sources within China have indicated that the character gave a negative and stereotypical portrayal of Chinese people.[37]

Home media[edit]

The film was released on DVD and Blu-Ray on November 19, 2007, in the UK and December 4, 2007, in the United States and Canada. The 2-Disc Limited Edition DVD was in continuous circulation until it stopped on September 30, 2008. In contrast, the Blu-ray Disc release, containing all of the features from the 2-Disc DVD version (including some original scenes from the theatrical release, but excluding the writer's commentary) is still widely available. The initial Blu-ray Disc release was misprinted on the back of the box as 1080i, although Disney confirmed it to be 1080p. Disney decided not to recall the misprinted units, but to fix the error on subsequent printings.[38] DVD sales brought in $296,043,871 in revenue, marking the best-selling DVD of 2007, although it ranks second in terms of units sold (14,505,271) behind Transformers (16,234,195).[39]At World's End had its television premiere in the UK on Boxing Day 2009 on BBC One at 19:30,[40][41] and was watched by 6.06 million viewers.[42]

Reception[edit]

Critical response[edit]

On review aggregation website Rotten Tomatoes the film has an approval rating of 44% based on 228 reviews, with an average rating of 5.46/10. The site's critical consensus reads, "POTC: AWE provides the thrilling action scenes, but mixes in too many characters with too many incomprehensible plot threads."[43] At Metacritic, which assigns a weighted average rating to reviews, the film received an average score of 50 out of 100, based on 36 critics, indicating "mixed or average reviews".[44] Audiences polled by CinemaScore gave the film an average grade of "A–" on an A+ to F scale.[45]

Drew McWeeny praised the film's complexity as giving it repeat-viewing value, and its conclusion as "perhaps the most canny move it makes."[46] Todd Gilchrist found the story too similar to other cinematic trilogies such as Star Wars, but praised the production values.[47] Brian Lowry felt that "unlike last year's bloated sequel, it at least possesses some semblance of a destination, making it slightly more coherent – if no less numbing during the protracted finale."[48]Total Film praised the performances but complained that the twists and exposition made it hard to care for the characters.[49] Edward Douglas liked the film but had issues with its pacing,[50] while Blake Wright criticized the Davy Jones' Locker and Calypso segments.[51]James Berardinelli found it the weakest of the trilogy as "the last hour offers adventure as rousing as anything provided in either of the previous installments... which doesn't account for the other 108 minutes of this gorged, self-indulgent, and uneven production."[52]Peter Travers praised Richards and Rush but felt "there can indeed be too much of a good thing," regarding Depp's character.[53] Travers later declared the movie to be one of the worst films of the year.[54] Colm Andrew of the Manx Independent said the film was overall a disappointment and that "the final showdown ... is a non-event and the repetitive swordplay and inane plot contrivances simply become boring by the end".[55]Richard Roeper gave a positive review, saying "Gore Verbinski and the stunt and special effects crews have created one of the most impressive blends of live-action work and CGI wizardry ever put on film," and believing it "rarely drags and is almost always entertaining." He praised the performances of the actors as one of the best things about the film.[56]

Chow Yun-fat's character stirred controversy with the Chinese press. Perry Lam, of Hong Kong cultural magazine Muse, found an offensive resemblance between Chow's character and Fu Manchu: "Now Fu Manchu has returned after an absence of 27 years in the Hollywood cinema; except that, in a nod to political correctness and marketing realities, he is no longer called Fu Manchu."[57]

Box office[edit]

Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End earned $309,420,425 in North America and $654,000,000 in other countries, for a worldwide total of $963,420,425.[2] It is the highest-grossing film of 2007[58] and the third-highest-grossing film in the Pirates of the Caribbean series.[59] Compared to its predecessor, it grossed far less at the North American box office, but more outside North America. Still, its worldwide earnings are more than $100 million below Dead Man's Chest's.[60] During its worldwide opening weekend, it grossed $344.0 million, making it the seventh-largest opening.[61]

North America

At World's End was released in a then-record 4,362 theaters in North America,[62] and was shown on around 11,500 screens, which is still an all-time record.[63] On its first three-day weekend, it earned $114,732,820. It set a Memorial Day 4-day weekend record ($139,802,190), which it still retains. This record was previously held by X-Men: The Last Stand.[64] Including Thursday night previews, as well, At World's End earned $153,042,234 in 5 days,[65] and is the fourth-highest-grossing film of 2007.[66] Among May's Big Three (Spider-Man 3, Shrek 3 and Pirates 3),[67][68]Pirates 3 grossed the least both during its opening weekend[69] and in total earnings.[70] However, this was mainly attributed to the fact that it was released third, after the other two films, so there was already too much competition.[71] It is also the second-highest-grossing film in the Pirates series.[59]

Outside North America

It is the eighteenth-highest-grossing film, the sixth-largest film distributed by Disney,[72] and the second-highest-grossing Pirates of the Caribbean film.[59] During its opening weekend, it grossed an estimated $216.0 million, which stands as the sixth biggest opening outside North America.[73] It set opening-weekend records in South Korea with $16.7 million (surpassed by Transformers: Dark of the Moon),[74] Russia, and the CIS with $14.0 million (first surpassed by Samy luchshiy film),[75] and Spain with $11.9 million[76] (surpassed by The Impossible).[77] It dominated for three consecutive weekends at the box office outside North America.[78] By June 12, 2007, its 20th day of release, the film had grossed $500 million, breaking Spider-Man 3's record for reaching that amount the fastest.[79] This record was first overtaken by Avatar (15 days to $500 million).[80] Its highest-grossing countries after North America are Japan, where it earned $91.1 million, and became the last Hollywood film to earn more than 10 billion yen before Avatar,[81] and the UK, Ireland, Malta ($81.4 million), and Germany ($59.4 million).[82]

Accolades[edit]

See also: List of accolades received by the Pirates of the Caribbean

At the 80th Academy Awards, Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End was nominated for two awards, Best Makeup and Best Visual Effects.

At the 2008 MTV Movie Awards, the film was nominated for three awards, including one win: the Best Comedic Performance (Johnny Depp). At the 34th People's Choice Awards, it was nominated for five awards, including four wins: Favorite Movie, Favorite Threequel, Favorite Male Movie Star (Johnny Depp) and Favorite Female Action Star (Keira Knightley).[83] Also, at the Teen Choice Awards it won five awards, out of six nominations. Finally, at the 2008 Kids' Choice Awards, it achieved three nominations but won only the Favorite Movie Actor award (Johnny Depp). However, Orlando Bloom was nominated for a Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Supporting Actor.

Sequel[edit]

Main article: Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides

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External links[edit]

Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pirates_of_the_Caribbean:_At_World%27s_End

Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End

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Running time

170 minutes (2 hours 50 minutes)

Gross Revenue

$963,420,425

"At the End of the World, the Adventure Begins."
―Tagline[src]

Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End is the third installment in the Pirates of the Caribbeanfilm series, released on May 25, 2007 as the sequel to Dead Man's Chest—itself the sequel to The Curse of the Black Pearl. The film stars Johnny Depp (Captain Jack Sparrow), Orlando Bloom (Will Turner), Keira Knightley (Elizabeth Swann), with Chow Yun-Fat (Sao Feng), and Geoffrey Rush, (Barbossa). It was directed by Gore Verbinski, produced by Jerry Bruckheimer, and written by Ted Elliott and Terry Rossio. At World's End would be followed in 2011 by On Stranger Tides.

Synopsis[]

Just when he's needed most, Captain Jack Sparrow (Johnny Depp), that witty and wily charmer of a pirate, is trapped on a sea of sand in Davy Jones' Locker. In an increasingly shaky alliance, Will Turner (Orlando Bloom), Elizabeth Swann (Keira Knightley), and Captain Barbossa (Geoffrey Rush) begin a desperate quest to find and rescue him. Captain Jack's the last of the nine Pirate Lords of the Brethren Court who must all come together united in one last stand to preserve the freedom-loving pirates' way of life. From exotic Singapore to World's End and beyond, from Shipwreck Island to a titanic battle, this adventure's filled with over-the-edge action, irreverent humor, and seafaring myth and magic.

Plot[]

Hoist the Colours[]

Mass executions of pirates and pirate sympathizers are underway at Fort Charles in Port Royal, at the behest of LordCutler Beckett (Tom Hollander), who begins his War Against Piracy as he gains control of the Dead Man's Chest. Among those waiting at the gallows is a young cabin boy (Brendyn Bell), who begins singing a pirate shanty, Hoist the Colours. The song is picked up by the entire assembly, and its final line ("Never shall we die") continues to resonate as the singers are hanged. The boy's piece of eight falls to the ground.

Singapore[]

Meanwhile in Singapore, Elizabeth Swann (Keira Knightley) is rowing through the streets in a peapod canoe, singing further verses of Hoist the Colours. She is confronted by Tai Huang (Reggie Lee), but is revealed to be in the company of Hector Barbossa (Geoffrey Rush). Led by Huang, Swann and Barbossa make their way to a bath house presided over by the feared CaptainSao Feng (Chow Yun-Fat). Meanwhile, the surviving members of the motley crew, including Joshamee Gibbs (Kevin McNally), Marty (Martin Klebba), Cotton (David Bailie), Pintel (Lee Arenberg) and Ragetti (Mackenzie Crook), are infiltrating the lower levels of the bath house. The newest member of the crew, mystic Tia Dalma (Naomie Harris), is disguised nearby as a common hawker.

After being forced to remove their weapons, Barbossa and Elizabeth meet Sao Feng inside the bath house. He questions their intentions to bargain for his navigational charts, revealing that a thief had attempted to steal them earlier in the day. The thief is being held in the bath house, and is none other than William Turner (Orlando Bloom). Sao Feng makes to kill him, tricking Elizabeth into giving away their connection to him by gasping in fright. Barbossa takes charge, reminding Feng that the "song has been sung", and all Pirate Lords—of which Feng is one—are bound to convene at Shipwreck Cove. Barbossa requires the charts to reach World's End, and from there descend into Davy Jones' Locker to rescue the Pirate Lord, CaptainJack Sparrow (Johnny Depp). This angers Feng, who holds a grudge against Sparrow. The crew, hidden below the floorboards, do not help matters by throwing Barbossa and Elizabeth swords at the mention of the word "weapons". During the stand-off, Feng notices one of the bath house residents has a fake tattoo, though Barbossa claims the man is not his. At that moment, soldiers of the East India Trading Company burst in, led by Mercer (David Schofield).

A battle ensued in the bathhouse, which would later lead into the streets of Singapore. Throughout the battle, there have been casualties on both sides, including many EITC soldiers and both of Sao Feng's body guards Park and Lian. At one point, Mercer overhears a conversation between Sao Feng and Will. Turner promises Feng a chance to meet with Lord Beckett and spare himself from the EITC's attentions, and in exchange Will desires command of the Black Pearl. Feng gives Will the charts, and lends Barbossa both a ship, the Hai Peng, and a crew led by Tai Huang. They depart Singapore for World's End.

At World's End[]

"For certain, you have to be lost to find a place as can’t be found. Elseways, everyone would know where it was."
―Hector Barbossa[src]

Meanwhile, the Flying Dutchman is laying siege to a pirate fleet, utterly destroying its ships. In his office, Lord Beckett is musing on the significance of the piece of eight, wishing to know the location of the meeting place of the Brethren Court. GovernorWeatherby Swann (Jonathan Pryce) is being forced to sign execution orders. Beckett summons AdmiralJames Norrington (Jack Davenport), and reunites him with an "old friend"; his sword, forged over a year before by Will Turner.

The crew of the Hai Peng sails across a frozen ocean, and Tia Dalma explains to Pintel and Ragetti that Jack has been taken to a place "not of death, but punishment". Will tries in vain to decipher the cryptic instructions on the charts, while Barbossa, Gibbs and Pintel fill in with information on the "green flash"; the signal of a soul returning to the world.

Lord Beckett surveys the wrecks of the pirate fleet with consternation, and muses that Governor Swann is no longer of use to him. He orders the Dead Man's Chest to be brought aboard the Flying Dutchman, berating Davy Jones (Bill Nighy) for not leaving any survivors alive to question. Beckett reminds him that Jones is under his control, citing the death of the Kraken, on Beckett's command. Jones is clearly not happy with the situation, but has no choice but to serve the East India Trading Company in its War Against Piracy

"Don't be so unkind. You may not survive to pass this way again, and these be the last friendly words you'll hear."
―Hector Barbossa to Elizabeth Swann[src]

Under a clear, starry sky, the Hai Peng sails closer to World's End. Elizabeth remains unable to speak to Will, saying only that everything will be fine once Jack is rescued. Tia Dalma reminds Will that for what he wants most, "there is a cost must be paid in the end". The crew faces bigger problems, however, when Barbossa leads them towards a massive waterfall—World's End. The crew attempts to slow the ship, which plunges over the edge and into darkness.

Davy Jones' Locker[]

"I have no sympathy for any of you feculent maggots and no more patience to pretend otherwise. Gentlemen! I wash my hands of this weirdness."
―Jack Sparrow to his hallucinations[src]

In the maddening dimension of Davy Jones' Locker, Jack Sparrow is suffering under hallucinations onboard the Black Pearl. He sees multiple versions of himself crewing the ship, but cannot command any of them. He decides to take leave of his visions, and jumps off the ship. He finds himself in a vast, seemingly endless white-sand desert, where he encounters thousands upon thousands of crabs. Under sheer numbers, the crabs lift the Black Pearl and begin rolling it across the dunes, with Jack in pursuit. His former crew have meanwhile made it to the shore of the beach, having survived the fall into the Locker at the cost of the Hai Peng. The crabs retreat to Tia Dalma, just as the Black Pearl crests a nearby dune, Captain Jack Sparrow standing high on its mainmast.

The Black Pearl rolls into the ocean, and Jack is reunited with his crew, whom he initially mistakes for further hallucinations—until Elizabeth, steps forward and tells him they are real and he recoils at seeing the woman who left him to die. He takes Barbossa's resurrection in stride, and soon learns of what's going on in the living realm and begins choosing his new crew members, including Tai Huang's men but neglecting Barbossa, Will, Elizabeth, Pintel and Ragetti, all of them having been enemies and trying to kill him in the past. During this exchange, he also reveals to Will that Elizabeth betrayed him. However, as Barbossa holds the navigational charts, and Jack finds his compass useless in the Locker, he has no choice but to accept them as well.

The crew sets sail across the boundless seas of the Locker, with Jack and Barbossa competing for captaincy of "their" ship. Will encounters Elizabeth below decks, and they have what is possibly their first real conversation together since Jack's death. Will realizes that Elizabeth is not in love with Jack, but instead feels guilty for abandoning him to the Kraken. Nevertheless, Will finds himself unable to trust Elizabeth, and they part, their problems unresolved. As night falls, Pintel and Ragetti spot bodies floating in the doldrums, which Tia Dalma identifies as the souls of men and women drowned at sea. She further explains that it was the duty of Davy Jones, once a man, to care for these souls and usher them into the afterlife. In return, he would be able to reunite, every ten years, with "she who love him, truly". Following the floating bodies come boats occupied by a single soul. Elizabeth spots her father, and believes they are back in the land of the living, until Weatherby informs her that he thinks he is dead. He explains that he had learned about the Dead Man's Chest—that if one were to stab the heart within, their heart was bound to take its place—considering it a "silly thing to die for", though both Jack and Will find the news very interesting. Elizabeth attempts to bring her father aboard, but his boat sails on, Weatherby promising to give Elizabeth's love to her mother. Tia Dalma states that Weatherby is now at peace.

Up is Down[]

"Up is down. Well that’s just maddeningly unhelpful. Why are these things never clear?"
―Jack Sparrow[src]

With the water and the rum gone, the situation aboard the Black Pearl is becoming dire. Jack continues to experience hallucinations, during which he begins to form a plan to kill Davy Jones and captain the Flying Dutchman himself, thus ensuring immortality. He receives inspiration, and is able to decipher the charts ("Up is Down"). He lures the crew into rocking the ship, tipping it upside down in the water just as the sun sets in the Locker. The Black Pearl is transported back into the land of the living at sunrise, where the crew immediately pull out their guns in a tense stand-off. Barbossa informs Jack that the Brethren Court is gathering, though Sparrow is adamant he will not be attending. He assures Barbossa he will not be returning to the Locker, and attempts to shoot him… finding that his pistol has become water logged and will not fire. The rest of the crew have suffered the same setback, and are forced to cooperate. Will locates a fresh water spring on a nearby island, to which the crew sails.

Just Good Business[]

"There is no honor in remaining with the losing side, leaving it for the winning side…that's just good business."
"The
losin' side, ye say?"
―Sao Feng and Hector Barbossa.[src]

There, they discover the corpse of the Kraken, over which Jack reflects on his own mortality. They locate the spring, but at that moment, the Empress, flagship of Sao Feng, is spotted off-shore—and Tai Huang reveals his true colours and ambushes Jack's crew. They are brought aboard the Black Pearl, where Feng greets Jack by punching him on the nose, before claiming that an "old friend" wishes to speak with him: directing his attention to the HMS Endeavour. Onboard, Jack meets Cutler Beckett, who reminds Jack that Davy Jones will still want his debt settled. Onboard the Black Pearl, Mercer claims the ship for the East India Trading Company, despite it having been promised to both Feng and Will. Beckett attempts to persuade Jack to give him information concerning the Brethren Court, while Barbossa tries to sway Feng into ending his deal with the Company. Barbossa reminds Feng that the Brethren has the power to release Calypso, and thus bring the "power of the seas" to bear against Beckett. Jack agrees to lead Beckett to Shipwreck Cove, in exchange for the loyal members of his crew, though

Beckett is interested in what Jack wishes for Elizabeth. Feng himself is also interested in Elizabeth, having been regarding her curiously while Barbossa spoke of Calypso. Over Will's objections, both Barbossa and Elizabeth agree to Feng's terms, while Beckett threatens to kill Jack, in order to use Jack's compass to find Shipwreck Cove. Jack warns him that if he does this, he will face the very difficult task of taking Shipwreck Cove by force, and offers to lure the Pirate Lords out of the fortress, in exchange for his debt to Jones being withdrawn. Feng finally agrees, able to take Elizabeth aboard the Empress and allow the Black Pearl to escape, and his men launch a broadside on the Endeavour. Barbossa duels with Mercer and fearing for his life, Mercer jumps off the ship.

Betrayal and Redemption[]

During the confusion, Jack seals his deal with Beckett and makes a swashbuckling escape back to the Black Pearl. Beckett orders the Flying Dutchman to pursue the Empress, though his own pursuit of Sparrow's crew is delayed by the damage suffered by his ship. Onboard the Empress, Feng has Elizabeth dressed in fine Chinese silks, and calls her "Calypso". Elizabeth plays along, though rebuffs Feng's romantic advances. The Pirate Lord becomes angry, and forces himself on her. At that moment, the ship comes under attack from the Flying Dutchman, and the Captain's cabin is hit. Elizabeth recovers to find Feng knocked against a wall, impaled on a piece of wood. He implores her to go to Shipwreck Cove in his place, giving her his piece of eight and names her his successor both as a Pirate Lord and captain of the Empress. He dies, still believing her to be Calypso, though Tai Huang is not ready to accept his new captain. The crew are rounded up on deck, where Elizabeth is reunited with Norrington. He claims to be unaware of Weatherby's death, and though he spares Elizabeth from Davy Jones, Elizabeth is unable to forgive him for choosing the side of the enemy.

Elizabeth and her new crew are locked in the brig of the Flying Dutchman while the Empress is towed behind. Elizabeth encounters William "Bootstrap Bill" Turner (Stellan Skarsgård), who has fallen into a state of madness, able only to recall his name, and that Will promised to free him. He manages to identify Elizabeth as the girl his son loves, and despairs that Will would never choose to bind himself to the Flying Dutchman and free his father, when he could remain with Elizabeth. He lapses back into insanity, forgetting the conversation completely, stating only that Will is coming for him.

Meanwhile, Beckett and LieutenantGreitzer (David Meunier) are following a trail of bodies tied to barrels, evidently as a path to Shipwreck Cove. Beckett considers it to be a "gambit by a skilled opponent". It turns out that it is Will who is leaving the trail, and is confronted by Jack, who mocks Will's decision to do as promised at lead Beckett to Shipwreck Cove. He then reveals his intention to replace Jones as captain of the Flying Dutchman, thus allowing Will to "avoid the choice" between Elizabeth and "Bootstrap". Jack considers binding himself to the Flying Dutchman to be a form of freedom, though is not prepared to do the duty. He hands Will his compass, then sends him overboard, intending him to be picked up by the Endeavour.

Onboard the Flying Dutchman, Elizabeth is surprised to find Norrington has re-evaluated his position, and helps she and her crew escape the ship. Elizabeth is initially dubious, though implores him to come with her back to the Empress when he decides to remain aboard the ship and hold off "Bootstrap Bill". Will's father is unable to realize Norrington is helping Elizabeth, adamant only that "no one leaves the ship". Norrington shoots the line linking the Empress to the Flying Dutchman, stopping Elizabeth from re-boarding to help him, and he is stabbed by the confused "Bootstrap". Dying, James is confronted by Davy Jones, who seems set to offer him the choice of service aboard the ship. In response, James thrusts his sword into Jones' shoulder before dying. Jones keeps the sword for himself, and with the admiral dead, believes command of the ship has returned to him. However, he enters his cabin only to find Mercer has taken the key to the Dead Man's Chest, becoming the Flying Dutchman's new commander.

The Brethren Court[]

The Black Pearl arrives at the shore of Shipwreck Island, where Barbossa confronts Tia Dalma. He names her as Calypso, and orders Pintel and Ragetti to lock her in the brig, ensuring she is unable to escape before Barbossa can free her. He is left contemplating the reason he was brought back from the dead by Dalma, and his fate should he fail to free Calypso.

Meanwhile, Davy Jones is summoned aboard the HMS Endeavour, where Cutler Beckett is drinking tea with Will. Turner informs Jones of Jack's continued survival, though Beckett soon turns the conversation to the subject of Calypso. Jones is particularly vehement in lambasting his former love, and is enraged to learn the Brethren intends to release her. Jones reveals that it was he who showed the first Brethren Court how to bind her, thus matching Calypso's betrayal with one of his own. Will now strikes a bargain of his own. In return for the freedom of his father, Elizabeth, and himself, Will will help lead Beckett and Jones to Shipwreck Cove—with the help of Jack's compass. An additional price from Jones is that he would have Calypso murdered.

The fourth meeting of the Brethren Court is officially opened by Barbossa, who asks his fellow eight Lords to present their pieces of eight—symbols of their Lordship, though in actuality are little more than pieces of junk. Ragetti hands over his wooden eye as Barbossa's piece, though Jack attempts to stall for time in order to avoid handing in his piece. Elizabeth Swann interrupts at that moment, proclaiming the death of Sao Feng, and her position as his successor. The Brethren do not take well to this news, and do not take Elizabeth's warning that the Flying Dutchman is approaching, or her suggestion to fight seriously, believing Shipwreck Cove to be an impregnable fortress. Barbossa, however, voices his plan to free Calypso to use her wrath against Lord Beckett. The Court opposes the notion, and as arguments turn into provocations, the meeting descends into a brawl.

While the meeting continues, Davy Jones arrives onboard the Black Pearl, to confront Tia Dalma. He angrily asks her why she did not meet him on his one day ashore, and Dalma simply replies that it is her nature. She momentarily reverts Jones back to his human form, promising to give him her heart when she is freed. She also vows to turn against the Brethren Court, and show them the full extent of her cruelty.

The Court stops fighting for a moment to listen to a rambling monologue by Jack, who agrees with Elizabeth, stating that the pirates must fight, if only to run away, pointing out the dangers of the other two plans; Calypso may not be too friendly towards the pirates, and they may kill each other off if they hole up in Shipwreck Cove. However, Barbossa reminds the Court that a declaration of war can only be passed by the Pirate King—and no one has held that title since the first Brethren. To settle the matter, Barbossa calls upon Captain Teague, Keeper of the Code, who confirms Barbossa's statement. Jack calls for a vote, upon which each Pirate Lord votes for him or herself…until Jack seconds Elizabeth's vote, thus electing her Pirate King by popular vote. The Brethren is stunned, and was surely set to have overruled the Code had the infamous Teague not been present. With no other choice, Elizabeth accepts her new position, and declares war at dawn. As the meeting comes to a close, Jack asks Teague about the nature of immortality. Teague states that the trick of it is not simply living forever, but living forever with yourself. Their brief reunion ends with Teague reuniting Jack with his mother—now reduced to a shrunken head carried on Teague's belt.

Parley[]

"Advise your Brethren: you can fight, and all of you will die, or you can not fight, in which case only most of you will die."
―Cutler Beckett to Elizabeth Swann[src]

As all the pirates get ready to fight, they see the horizon filled with Lord Beckett's massive fleet and became dumbstruck. Jack calls for a temporary parley, and he along with Elizabeth and Barbossa go to a small sand bar to meet up with Beckett, Jones, and Will. Jack's deal with Beckett is revealed, and in a fit of anger Barbossa slashes his sword at Jack, cutting off his Piece of Eight. Jack the monkey quickly grabs the piece. Elizabeth decides to trade Jack for Will. Jack is turned over to Jones, just as he had planned. As Barbossa, Elizabeth, and Will walk away Jack the monkey secretly hands Jack's Piece of Eight to Barbossa. Seeing an easy way out of the battle, Barbossa then frees Tia Dalma/Calypso and asks her to help in the battle between the pirates, Davy Jones, the Royal Navy, and the East India Trading Company with Will revealing Jones' betrayal of which she was unaware. However, Calypso disperses and Barbossa sees their last hope lost.

Maelstrom battle[]

However, Elizabeth didn't give up hope and tells the other pirates to "Hoist the Colours". As both fleets prepared for attack, a violent maelstrom emerges between the two fleets, implied to be the work of Calypso. The Black Pearl and the Flying Dutchman then steer into the storm and battle each other fiercely. During the battle, Davy Jones takes command of the Dutchman completely when he kills Mercer and takes the key to his chest, but is caught in a fight with Jack Sparrow who escapes the brig thanks to a trick Will taught him.

Jack is able to seize the chest holding Jones' heart, though he is confronted by Jones himself. The two captains battle while their crews eventually leap on the Dutchman and the Pearl and do battle. During this, Elizabeth and Will are joined in matrimony by Captain Barbossa while fighting the crew of the Flying Dutchman. While Barbossa is busy decapitating a crew member of the Flying Dutchman, the two ship's masts crash together.

Soon after, Will arrives on the Dutchman to only be in a duel with his father in which he defeats but doesn't kill his father. Jones defeats Elizabeth, but Will stabs him through the back, forgetting his heart is no longer there and is defeated by Jones who goes to kill him after seeing the love between him and Elizabeth. However, this allows Jack to get both the Key and the Chest and remove the heart which he threatens, but Jones stabs Will anyway. This breaks Bootstrap out of his insanity and he attacks Jones, allowing Jack time to help Will stab the heart, killing Davy Jones. Jones's last words are "Calypso", and he falls from the ship into the darkness of the maelstrom. Barbossa then orders the crew to shoot a chain at the masts, allowing him to safely guide the Black Pearl out of the Maelstrom. Jack and Elizabeth manage to escape the Dutchman by using a sail as a makeshift parasail and watch as the Flying Dutchman sinks into the Malestrom which then subsides.

Fate and the Fountain[]

Therefore Will is now the captain of the Flying Dutchman. Elizabeth is heartbroken, thinking Will is dead, but as the Flying Dutchman emerges from within the sea, Will is alive and the crew has returned to normal. The pirates of the Black Pearl and the Flying Dutchman then turn to face Cutler Beckett, and blow his ship apart, sinking it down to the watery depths. Beckett himself is consumed in the explosion and his body is blown overboard.

"There's more than one way to live forever. Gents, I give you the Fountain of Youth."
―Barbossa to the crew of the Black Pearl[src]

The pirates emerge victorious, but learn that the Flying Dutchman must stay in the undersea-world and can only come to shore for one day, every ten years. Will frees his father, but Bootstrap Bill decides to remain with his son on the ship of his own free will. Will and Elizabeth spend their "last day" together on a beach and she promises she will wait for him and keep his heart safe. After discovering that Barbossa has made off with the Black Pearl, Jack sails off in a dinghy. Barbossa attempts to show the crew where the Fountain of Youth is on Sao Feng's charts, but he discovers a large chunk has been removed from the charts by Jack himself. Jack, who anticipated Barbossa's actions begins his own voyage to the Fountain of Youth himself.

Epilogue[]

Ten years later, Elizabeth and her son reside in Port Royal. The boy sings a pirate song, with Elizabeth following behind. They both stand at the edge of a cliff, looking at the horizon, waiting for the sun to set. Finally, they see a flash of green light as the Flying Dutchman reappears, signifying Will Turner's return from the Land of the Dead.

  • In the film, it is unclear whether Elizabeth's supposed fidelity would allow Will to be with her. Later, the writers, Ted Elliott and Terry Rossio, confirmed that the flash of green light seen at the end is the sign that Will's soul has returned to the world of the living, and that they can live together as a family; with their one day stretched to a lifetime.[1][2] However, this was overruled by the fifth film, Dead Men Tell No Tales, as the prologue to the film, which took place after this epilogue, showed that Will was still under the effect of the curse, and was only freed when the Trident of Poseidon was destroyed by his son.

Cast[]

Singing Gallows pirates[]

  • Lawrence Cummings
  • Chris M. Allport
  • Jim Raycroft
  • Robert Hovencamp
  • Geoffrey Alch
  • Ned Wertimer
  • Samela A. Beasom
  • Jessica-Elisabeth
  • Caesar Peters

Pirates[]

  • Kimo Keoke
  • Rick Mali
  • David Prak
  • Henry T. Yamada
  • Jonathan Limbo
  • Mick Gallagher
  • Shioung Shin Li
  • Huynh Quang
  • Ronnie Cruz
  • Thomas Isao Morinaka
  • Lidet Viravong
  • Ova Saopeng
  • Stuart 'Phoenix' Wong

Uncredited[]

Appearances[]

For character appearances with known portrayers see the "Cast" section.

Individuals[]

 

Locations[]

Organizations and groups[]

Ships[]

Miscellanea[]

Promotional[]

For more promotional images and videos, go to the Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End/Gallery.

Behind the scenes[]

Title[]

The subtitle, At World's End, was decided by visitors to the message boards of Wordplay, the website created by screenwriters Ted Elliott and Terry Rossio. The two proposed titles, World's End and At World's End, were given as the final choices, with a further choice to include or exclude the apostrophe.[3] In 2014, a late production draft was posted on Wordplay Archives, under the title Calypso's Fury. According to Terry Rossio, the title was never in serious contention, simply a working title, until marketing deadlines forced the eventual title to be determined.[4]Uncharted Waters was at one point rumored to be a proposed title.

Music[]

Main article: Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End (soundtrack)

The film's score was composed by Hans Zimmer, and built on established cues while introducing several new ones. Most prominent of these is Hoist the Colours, which repeats in various permeations throughout the film. An original song, the lyrics were written by Ted Elliott and Terry Rossio, and several lines are sung by characters in the film.

The soundtrack also includes a new love theme for Elizabeth Swann and William Turner (first heard during the cue "At Wit's End" and more prominently in "One Day"), and oriental-styled music for Sao Feng ("Singapore"). The cue "Parley" was inspired by and based on "Man With the Harmonica" by Ennio Morricone from Once Upon a Time in the West".

Reprised themes include "The Medallion Calls", "Jack Sparrow", "Davy Jones" and "He's a Pirate".

Releases[]

Worldwide release[]

The film premiered on May 19, 2007 at Disneyland

Источник: https://pirates.fandom.com/wiki/Pirates_of_the_Caribbean:_At_World%27s_End

youtube video

  • Johnny Depp,
  • Bill Nighy,
  • Keira Knightley,
  • Orlando Bloom,
  • Geoffrey Rush,
  • Yun-Fat Chow,
  • Jonathan Pryce,
  • Jack Davenport,
  • Tom Hollander,
  • Stellan Skarsgard,
  • Naomie Harris,
  • Kevin McNally,
  • Mackenzie Crook,
  • David Schofield
  • Cannily, many scenes for .At World’s End were shot during the filming of .Dead Man’s Chest, so the two films share a few locations.

    Interiors were filmed at Universal Studios in Los Angeles, where the port of ‘Singapore’ – including the harbour, stilt houses and the bathhouse – was constructed atop a vast water tank on Stage 12.

    And, as before, seagoing scenes with the Black Pearl were shared between the tank on Grand Bahama, and the waters off of San Pedro and Redondo Beach, California.

    The film also returns to the main ‘Tortuga’ set in Wallilabou Bay, on the island of St Vincent in the West Indies, though only for a short scene toward the end of the film.

    It’s back to Dominica for the ominous approach to ‘Shipwreck Island’, which was filmed at Capucin Point, on the northwesterly tip of the island.

    Over on the northeastern coast of Dominica, Londonderry Bay provided the black sand beach where Jack's crew lands, and finds the remains of the dead Kraken.

    When the pirates and the forces of the East India company meet up for a ‘parlay’ – and the film briefly pays homage to Sergio Leone – the tiny sand spit is south of White Cay in The Exumas, where the .Dead Man’s Chest was buried in the previous film.

    A decidedly water-free location is ‘Davy Jones’s Locker’, the bleached-out desert where a whole shipload of jack Sparrows are stranded in an arid limbo.

    This spot is ten miles into the Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah, famous as the site of rocket-powered land vehicles setting all kinds of speed records.

    Covering over 30,000 acres or 45 square miles, the Salt Flats were formed when the ancient Lake Bonneville receded and evaporation left large concentrations of dissolved minerals deposited in surrounding soils.

    Although the layers that form the salt flats are almost five feet thick near the center, the crust can be only an inch or two at the edges. Take care when visiting – these outer edges become brown mud flats which can be hazardous. Once on the salt flats themselves, you’re very much on your own – remember there are no facilities or signs.

    The Salt Flats, across which Will Smith dragged the unconscious alien in Independence Day, are 120 miles west of Salt Lake City. There’s a 3.5 mile access road north from I-80 before you reach the state border of town of Wendover.

    The sand dunes, over which the army of crabs carries the stranded Black Pearl to the shore, are the Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes, on the Central Coast of California, in San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara Counties.

    In 1923, the Dunes were the location for Cecil B DeMille's silent version of The Ten Commandments. This was long before the strict environmental rules that now govern filming, and the sets were not entirely removed but buried in the sand. They’re starting to peek through the dunes and, amazingly, the 90-year-old remains have now become an archaeological site in their own right.

    For the climactic Maelstrom – the apocalyptic battle between the pirate and the East India Company armadas that takes place in a supernaturally-induced storm – the filmmakers needed to find a space large enough to contain full-sized replicas (from the decks up) of both the Black Pearl and Flying Dutchman.

    They ended up at Building #703 of a facility called Site 9, 2825 East Avenue P in Palmdale, California. A 600-foot-long, 300-foot-wide and 70-foot-tall hangar built in 1983 by Rockwell International for the assembly of 100 B-1 bombers, it had previously housed the vast airport set for Steven Spielberg’s The Terminal.

    A couple of second unit images include the ‘Frozen Ocean’, filled with icebergs and glaciers that the crew sails through to find ‘Davy Jones' Locker’, which was filmed in Greenland; and, if you needed a waterfall to provide a basis for the digitally rendered edge of the world, where could be better than Niagara Falls?

    There’s a coda in Hawaii, as Elizabeth and Will take their leave of each other for ten years at Pohaku Mauliuli Beach off Liu Place in Maunaloa, on the northwest tip of Molokai, one of the smaller islands in the center of the Hawaiian chain. The beach is overlooked by the large cinder cone of Pohaku Mauliuli – ‘black rock’ in the Hawaiian language – which is quite crumbly and loose in places, so it’s probably best to avoid the base of the hill.

    See also:
    Pirates Of The Caribbean: The Curse Of The Black Pearl
    Pirates Of The Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest
    Pirates Of The Caribbean: On Stranger Tides


     

    Источник: http://movie-locations.com/movies/p/Pirates-Of-The-Caribbean-3.php
    2007
    Pirates Of The Caribbean, At World's End location: Bonneville Salt Flats, Utah
    Pirates Of The Caribbean, At World's End location: a shipful of Jack Sparrows stranded in ‘Davy Jones’s Locker’: Bonneville Salt Flats, Utah

    Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End

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    Running time

    170 minutes (2 hours 50 minutes)

    Gross Revenue

    $963,420,425

    "At the End of the World, the Adventure Begins."
    ―Tagline[src]

    Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End is the third installment in the Pirates of the Caribbeanfilm series, released on May 25, 2007 as the sequel to Dead Man's Chest—itself the sequel to The Curse of the Black Pearl. The film stars Johnny Depp (Captain Jack Sparrow), Orlando Bloom (Will Turner), Keira Knightley (Elizabeth Swann), with Chow Yun-Fat (Sao Feng), and Geoffrey Rush, (Barbossa). It was directed by Gore Verbinski, produced by Jerry Bruckheimer, and written by Ted Elliott and Terry Rossio. At World's End would be followed in 2011 by On Stranger Tides.

    Synopsis[]

    Just when he's needed most, Captain Jack Sparrow (Johnny Depp), that witty and wily charmer of a pirate, is trapped on a sea of sand in Davy Jones' Locker. In an increasingly shaky alliance, Will Turner (Orlando Bloom), Elizabeth Swann (Keira Knightley), and Captain Barbossa (Geoffrey Rush) begin a desperate quest to find and rescue him. Captain Jack's the last of the nine Pirate Lords of the Brethren Court who must all come together united in one last stand to preserve the freedom-loving pirates' way of life. From exotic Singapore to World's End and beyond, from Shipwreck Island to a titanic battle, this adventure's filled with over-the-edge action, irreverent humor, and seafaring myth and magic.

    Plot[]

    Hoist the Colours[]

    Mass executions of pirates and pirate sympathizers are underway at Fort Charles in Port Royal, at the behest of LordCutler Beckett (Tom Hollander), who begins his War Against Piracy as he gains control of the Dead Man's Chest. Among those waiting at the gallows is a young cabin boy (Brendyn Bell), who begins singing a pirate shanty, Hoist the Colours. The song is picked up by the entire assembly, and its final line ("Never shall we die") continues to resonate as the singers are hanged. The boy's piece of eight falls to the ground.

    Singapore[]

    Meanwhile in Singapore, Elizabeth Swann (Keira Knightley) is rowing through the streets in a peapod canoe, singing further verses of Hoist the Colours. She is confronted by Tai Huang (Reggie Lee), but is revealed to be in the company of Hector Barbossa (Geoffrey Rush). Led by Huang, Swann and Barbossa make their way to a bath house presided over by the feared CaptainSao Feng (Chow Yun-Fat). Meanwhile, the surviving members of the motley crew, including Joshamee Gibbs (Kevin McNally), Marty (Martin Klebba), Cotton (David Bailie), Pintel (Lee Arenberg) and Ragetti (Mackenzie Crook), are infiltrating the lower levels of the bath house. The newest member of the crew, mystic Tia Dalma (Naomie Harris), is disguised nearby as a common hawker.

    After being forced to remove their weapons, Barbossa and Elizabeth meet Sao Feng inside the bath house. He questions their intentions to bargain for his navigational charts, revealing that a thief had attempted to steal them earlier in the day. The thief is being held in the bath house, and is none other than William Turner (Orlando Bloom). Sao Feng makes to kill him, tricking Elizabeth into giving away their connection to him by gasping in fright. Barbossa takes charge, reminding Feng that the "song has been keira knightley pirates of the caribbean at worlds end, and all Pirate Lords—of which Feng is one—are bound to convene at Shipwreck Cove. Barbossa requires the charts to reach World's End, and from there descend into Davy Jones' Locker to rescue the Pirate Lord, CaptainJack Sparrow (Johnny Depp). This angers Feng, who holds a grudge against Sparrow. The crew, hidden below the floorboards, do not help matters by throwing Barbossa and Elizabeth swords at the mention of the word "weapons". During the stand-off, Feng notices one of the bath house residents has a fake tattoo, though Barbossa claims the man is not his. At that moment, soldiers of the East India Trading Company burst in, led by Mercer (David Schofield).

    A battle ensued in the bathhouse, which would later lead into the streets of Singapore. Throughout the battle, there have been casualties on both sides, including many EITC soldiers and both of Sao Feng's body guards Park and Lian. At one point, Mercer overhears a conversation between Sao Feng and Will. Turner promises Feng a chance to meet with Lord Beckett and spare himself from the EITC's attentions, and in exchange Will desires command of the Black Pearl. Feng gives Will the charts, and lends Barbossa both a ship, the Hai Peng, and a crew led by Tai Huang. They depart Singapore for World's End.

    At World's End[]

    "For certain, you have to be lost to find a place as can’t be found. Elseways, everyone would know where it was."
    ―Hector Barbossa[src]

    Meanwhile, the Flying Dutchman is laying siege to a pirate fleet, utterly destroying its ships. In his office, Lord Beckett is musing on the significance of the piece of eight, wishing to know the location of the meeting place of the Brethren Court. GovernorWeatherby Swann (Jonathan Pryce) is being forced to sign execution orders. Beckett summons AdmiralJames Norrington (Jack Davenport), and reunites him with an "old friend"; his sword, forged over a year before by Will Turner.

    The crew of the Hai Peng sails across a frozen ocean, and Tia Dalma explains to Pintel and Ragetti keira knightley pirates of the caribbean at worlds end Jack has been taken to a place "not of death, but punishment". Will tries in vain to decipher the cryptic instructions on the charts, while Barbossa, Gibbs and Pintel fill in with information on the "green flash"; the signal of a soul returning to the world.

    Lord Beckett surveys the wrecks of the pirate fleet with consternation, and muses that Governor Swann is no longer of use to him. He orders the Dead Man's Chest to be brought aboard the Flying Dutchman, berating Davy Jones (Bill Nighy) for not leaving any survivors alive to question. Beckett reminds him that Jones is under his control, citing the death of the Kraken, on Beckett's command. Jones is clearly not happy with the situation, but has no choice but to serve the East India Trading Company in its War Against Piracy

    "Don't be so unkind. You may not survive to pass this way again, and these be the last friendly words you'll hear."
    ―Hector Barbossa to Elizabeth Swann[src]

    Under a clear, starry sky, the Hai Peng sails closer to World's End. Elizabeth remains unable to speak to Will, saying only that everything will be fine once Jack is rescued. Tia Dalma reminds Will that for what he wants most, "there is a cost must be paid in the end". The crew faces bigger problems, however, when Barbossa leads them towards a massive waterfall—World's End. The crew attempts to slow the ship, which plunges over the edge and into darkness.

    Davy Jones' Locker[]

    "I have no sympathy for any of you feculent maggots and no more patience to pretend otherwise. Gentlemen! I wash my hands of this weirdness."
    ―Jack Sparrow to his hallucinations[src]

    In the maddening dimension of Davy Jones' Locker, Jack Sparrow is suffering under hallucinations onboard the Black Pearl. He sees multiple versions of himself crewing the ship, but cannot command any of them. He decides to take leave of his visions, and jumps off the ship. He finds himself in a vast, seemingly endless white-sand desert, where he encounters thousands upon thousands of crabs. Under sheer numbers, the crabs lift the Black Pearl and begin rolling it across the dunes, with Jack in pursuit. His former crew have meanwhile made it to the shore of the beach, having survived the fall into the Locker at the cost of the Hai Peng. The crabs retreat to Tia Dalma, just as the Black Pearl crests a nearby dune, Captain Jack Sparrow standing high on its mainmast.

    The Black Pearl rolls into the ocean, and Jack is reunited with his crew, whom he initially mistakes for further hallucinations—until Elizabeth, steps forward and tells him they are real and he recoils at seeing the woman who left him to die. He takes Barbossa's resurrection in stride, and soon learns of what's going on in the living realm and begins choosing his new crew members, including Tai Huang's men but neglecting Barbossa, Will, Elizabeth, Pintel and Ragetti, all of them having been enemies and trying to kill him in the past. During this exchange, he also reveals to Will that Elizabeth betrayed him. However, as Barbossa holds the navigational charts, and Jack finds his compass useless in the Locker, he has no choice but to accept them as well.

    The crew sets sail across the boundless seas of the Locker, with Jack and Barbossa competing for captaincy of "their" ship. Will encounters Elizabeth below decks, and they have what is possibly their first real conversation together since Jack's death. Will realizes that Elizabeth is not in love with Jack, but instead feels guilty for abandoning him to the Kraken. Nevertheless, Will finds himself unable to trust Elizabeth, and they part, their problems unresolved. As night falls, Pintel and Ragetti spot bodies floating in the doldrums, which Tia Dalma identifies as the souls of men and women drowned at sea. She further explains that it was the duty of Davy Jones, once a man, to care for these souls and usher them into the afterlife. In return, he would be able to reunite, every ten years, with "she who love him, truly". Following the floating bodies come boats occupied by a single soul. Elizabeth spots her father, and believes they are back in the land of the living, until Weatherby informs her that he thinks he is dead. He explains that he had learned about the Dead Man's Chest—that if one were to stab the heart within, their heart was bound to take its place—considering it a "silly thing to die for", though both Jack and Will find the news very interesting. Elizabeth attempts to bring her father aboard, but his boat sails on, Weatherby promising to give Elizabeth's love to her mother. Tia Dalma states that Weatherby is now at peace.

    Up is Down[]

    "Up is down. Well that’s just maddeningly unhelpful. Why are these things never clear?"
    ―Jack Sparrow[src]

    With the water and the rum gone, the situation aboard the Black Pearl is becoming dire. Jack continues to experience hallucinations, during which he begins to form a plan to kill Davy Jones and captain the Flying Dutchman himself, thus ensuring immortality. He receives inspiration, and is able to decipher the charts ("Up is Down"). He lures the crew into rocking the ship, tipping it upside down in the water just as the sun sets in the Locker. The Black Pearl is transported back into the land of the living at sunrise, where the crew immediately pull out their guns in a tense stand-off. Barbossa informs Jack that the Brethren Court is gathering, though Sparrow is adamant he will not be attending. He assures Barbossa he will not be returning to the Locker, and attempts to shoot him… finding that his pistol has become water logged and will not fire. The rest of the crew have suffered the same setback, and are forced to cooperate. Will locates a fresh water spring on a nearby island, to which the crew sails.

    Just Good Business[]

    "There is no honor in remaining with the losing side, leaving it for the winning side…that's just good business."
    "The
    losin' side, ye say?"
    ―Sao Feng and Hector Barbossa.[src]

    There, they discover the corpse of the Kraken, over which Jack reflects on his own mortality. They locate the spring, but at that moment, the Empress, flagship of Sao Feng, is spotted off-shore—and Tai Huang reveals his true colours and ambushes Jack's crew. They are brought aboard the Black Pearl, where Feng greets Jack by punching him on the nose, before claiming that an "old friend" wishes to speak with him: directing his attention to the HMS Endeavour. Onboard, Jack meets Cutler Beckett, who reminds Jack that Davy Jones will still want his debt settled. Onboard the Black Pearl, Mercer claims the ship for the East India Trading Company, despite it having been promised to both Feng and Will. Beckett attempts to persuade Jack to give him information concerning the Brethren Court, while Barbossa tries to sway Feng into ending his deal with the Company. Barbossa reminds Feng that the Brethren has the power to release Calypso, and thus bring the "power of the seas" to bear against Beckett. Jack agrees to lead Beckett to Shipwreck Cove, in exchange for the loyal members of his crew, though

    Beckett is interested in what Jack wishes for Elizabeth. Feng himself is also interested in Elizabeth, having been regarding her curiously while Barbossa spoke of Calypso. Over Will's objections, both Barbossa and Elizabeth agree to Feng's terms, while Beckett threatens to kill Jack, in order to use Jack's compass to find Shipwreck Cove. Jack warns him that if he does this, he will face the very difficult task of taking Shipwreck Cove by force, and offers to lure the Pirate Lords out of the fortress, in exchange for his debt to Jones being withdrawn. Feng finally agrees, able to take Elizabeth aboard the Empress and allow the Black Pearl to escape, and his men launch a broadside on the Endeavour. Barbossa duels with Mercer and fearing for his life, Mercer jumps off the ship.

    Betrayal and Redemption[]

    During the confusion, Jack seals his deal with Beckett and makes a swashbuckling escape back to the Black Pearl. Beckett orders the Flying Dutchman to pursue the Empress, though his own pursuit of Sparrow's crew is delayed by the damage suffered by his ship. Onboard the Empress, Feng has Elizabeth dressed in fine Chinese silks, and calls her "Calypso". Elizabeth plays along, though rebuffs Feng's romantic advances. The Pirate Lord becomes angry, and forces himself on her. At that moment, the ship comes under attack from the Flying Dutchman, and the Captain's cabin is hit. Elizabeth recovers to find Feng knocked against a wall, impaled on a piece of wood. He implores her to go to Shipwreck Cove in his place, giving her his piece of eight and names her his successor both as a Pirate Lord and captain of the Empress. He dies, still believing her to be Calypso, though Tai Huang is not ready to accept his new captain. The crew are rounded up on deck, where Elizabeth is reunited with Norrington. He claims to be unaware of Weatherby's death, and though he spares Elizabeth from Davy Jones, Elizabeth is unable to forgive him for choosing the side of the enemy.

    Elizabeth and her new crew are locked in the brig of the Flying Dutchman while the Empress is towed behind. Elizabeth encounters William "Bootstrap Bill" Turner (Stellan Skarsgård), who has fallen into a state of madness, able only to recall his name, and that Will promised to free him. He manages to identify Elizabeth as the girl his son loves, and despairs that Will would never choose keira knightley pirates of the caribbean at worlds end bind himself to the Flying Dutchman and free his father, when he could remain with Elizabeth. He lapses back into insanity, forgetting the conversation completely, stating only that Will is coming for him.

    Meanwhile, Beckett and LieutenantGreitzer (David Meunier) are following a trail of bodies tied to barrels, evidently as a path to Shipwreck Cove. Beckett considers it to be a "gambit by a skilled opponent". It turns out that it is Will who is leaving the trail, and is confronted by Jack, who mocks Will's decision to do as promised at lead Beckett to Shipwreck Cove. He then reveals his intention to replace Jones as captain of the Flying Dutchman, thus allowing Will to "avoid the choice" between Elizabeth and "Bootstrap". Jack considers binding himself to the Flying Dutchman to be a form of freedom, though is not prepared to do the duty. He hands Will his compass, then sends him overboard, intending him to be picked up by the Endeavour.

    Onboard the Flying Dutchman, Elizabeth is surprised to find Norrington has re-evaluated his position, and helps she and her crew escape the ship. Elizabeth is initially dubious, though implores him to come with her back to the Empress when he decides to remain aboard the ship and hold off "Bootstrap Bill". Will's father is unable to realize Norrington is helping Keira knightley pirates of the caribbean at worlds end, adamant only that "no one leaves the ship". Norrington shoots the line linking the Empress to the Flying Dutchman, stopping Elizabeth from re-boarding to help him, and he is stabbed by the confused "Bootstrap". Dying, James is confronted by Davy Jones, who seems set to offer him the choice of service aboard the ship. In response, James thrusts his sword into Jones' shoulder before dying. Jones keeps the sword for himself, and with the admiral dead, believes command of the ship has returned to him. However, he enters his cabin only to find Mercer has taken the key to the Dead Man's Chest, becoming the Flying Dutchman's new commander.

    The Brethren Court[]

    The Black Pearl arrives at the shore of Shipwreck Island, where Barbossa confronts Tia Dalma. He names her as Calypso, and orders Pintel and Ragetti to lock her in the brig, ensuring she is unable to escape before Barbossa can free her. He is left contemplating the reason he was brought back from the dead by Dalma, and his fate should he fail to free Calypso.

    Meanwhile, Davy Jones is summoned aboard the HMS Endeavour, where Cutler Beckett is drinking tea with Will. Turner informs Jones of Jack's continued survival, though Beckett soon turns the conversation to the subject of Calypso. Jones is particularly vehement in lambasting his former love, and is enraged to learn the Brethren intends to release her. Jones reveals that it was he who showed the first Brethren Court how to bind her, thus matching Calypso's betrayal with one of his own. Will now strikes a bargain of his own. In return for the freedom of his father, Elizabeth, and himself, Will will help lead Beckett and Jones to Shipwreck Cove—with the help of Jack's compass. An additional price from Jones is that he would have Calypso murdered.

    The fourth meeting of the Brethren Court is officially opened by Barbossa, who asks his fellow eight Lords to present their pieces of eight—symbols of their Lordship, though in actuality are little more than pieces of junk. Ragetti hands over his wooden eye as Barbossa's piece, though Jack attempts to stall for time in order to avoid handing in his piece. Elizabeth Swann interrupts at that moment, proclaiming the death of Sao Feng, and her position as his successor. The Brethren do not take well to this news, and do not take Elizabeth's warning that keira knightley pirates of the caribbean at worlds end Flying Dutchman is approaching, or her suggestion to fight seriously, believing Shipwreck Cove to be an impregnable fortress. Barbossa, however, voices his plan to free Calypso to use her wrath against Lord Beckett. The Court opposes the notion, and as arguments turn into provocations, the meeting descends into a brawl.

    While the meeting continues, Davy Jones arrives onboard the Black Pearl, to confront Tia Dalma. He angrily asks her why she did not meet him on his one day ashore, and Dalma simply replies that it is her nature. She momentarily reverts Jones back to his human form, promising to give him her heart when she is freed. She also vows to turn against the Brethren Court, and show them the full extent of her cruelty.

    The Court stops fighting for a moment to listen to a rambling monologue by Jack, who agrees with Elizabeth, stating that the pirates must fight, if only to run away, pointing out the dangers of the other two plans; Calypso may not be too friendly towards the pirates, and they may kill each other off if they hole up in Shipwreck Cove. However, Barbossa reminds the Court that a declaration of war can only be passed by the Pirate King—and no one has held that title since the first Brethren. To settle the matter, Barbossa calls upon Captain Teague, Keeper of the Code, who confirms Barbossa's statement. Jack calls for a vote, upon which each Pirate Lord votes for him or herself…until Jack seconds Elizabeth's vote, thus electing her Pirate King by popular vote. The Brethren is stunned, and was surely set to have overruled the Code had the infamous Teague not been present. With no other choice, Elizabeth accepts her new position, and declares war at dawn. As the meeting comes to a close, Jack asks Teague about the nature of immortality. Teague states that the trick of it is not simply living forever, but living forever with yourself. Their brief reunion ends with Teague reuniting Jack with his mother—now reduced to a shrunken head carried on Teague's belt.

    Parley[]

    "Advise your Brethren: you can fight, and all of you will die, or you can not fight, in which case only most of you will die."
    ―Cutler Beckett to Elizabeth Swann[src]

    As all the pirates get ready to fight, they see the horizon filled with Lord Beckett's massive fleet and became dumbstruck. Jack calls for a temporary parley, and he along with Elizabeth and Barbossa go to a small sand bar to meet up with Beckett, Jones, and Will. Jack's deal with Beckett is revealed, and in a fit of anger Barbossa slashes his sword at Jack, cutting off his Piece of Eight. Jack the monkey quickly grabs the piece. Elizabeth decides to trade Jack for Will. Jack is turned over to Jones, just as he had planned. As Barbossa, Elizabeth, and Will walk away Jack the monkey secretly hands Jack's Piece of Eight to Barbossa. Seeing an easy way out of the battle, Barbossa then frees Tia Dalma/Calypso and asks her to help in the battle between the pirates, Davy Jones, the Royal Navy, and the East India Trading Company with Will revealing Jones' betrayal of which she was unaware. However, Calypso disperses and Barbossa sees their last hope lost.

    Maelstrom battle[]

    However, Elizabeth didn't give up hope and tells the other pirates to "Hoist the Colours". As both fleets prepared for attack, a violent maelstrom emerges between the two fleets, implied to be the work of Calypso. The Black Pearl and the Flying Dutchman then steer into the storm and battle each other fiercely. During the battle, Davy Jones takes command of the Dutchman completely when he kills Mercer and takes the key to his chest, but is caught in a fight with Jack Sparrow who escapes the brig thanks to a trick Will taught him.

    Jack is able to seize the chest holding Jones' heart, though he is confronted by Jones himself. The two captains battle while their crews eventually leap on the Dutchman and the Pearl and do battle. During this, Elizabeth and Will are joined in matrimony by Captain Barbossa while fighting the crew of the Flying Dutchman. While Barbossa is busy decapitating a crew member of the Flying Dutchman, the two ship's masts crash together.

    Soon after, Will arrives on the Dutchman to only be in a duel with his father in which he defeats but doesn't kill his father. Jones defeats Elizabeth, but Will stabs him through the back, forgetting his heart is no longer there and is defeated by Jones who goes to kill him after seeing the love between him and Elizabeth. However, this allows Jack to get both the Key and the Chest and remove the heart which he threatens, but Jones stabs Will anyway. This breaks Bootstrap out of his insanity and he attacks Jones, allowing Jack time to help Will stab the heart, killing Davy Jones. Jones's last words are "Calypso", and he falls from the ship into the darkness of the maelstrom. Barbossa then orders the crew to shoot a chain at the masts, allowing him to safely guide the Black Pearl out of the Maelstrom. Jack and Elizabeth manage to escape the Dutchman by using a sail as a makeshift parasail and watch as the Flying Dutchman sinks into the Malestrom which then subsides.

    Fate and the Fountain[]

    Therefore Will is now the captain of the Flying Dutchman. Elizabeth is heartbroken, thinking Will is dead, but as the Flying Dutchman emerges from within the sea, Will is alive and the crew has returned to normal. The pirates of the Black Pearl and the Flying Dutchman then turn to face Cutler Beckett, and blow his ship apart, sinking it down to the watery depths. Beckett himself is consumed in the explosion and his body is blown overboard.

    "There's more than one way to live forever. Gents, I give you the Fountain of Youth."
    ―Barbossa to the crew of the Black Pearl[src]

    The pirates emerge victorious, but learn that the Flying Dutchman must stay in the undersea-world and can only come to shore for one day, every ten years. Will frees his father, but Bootstrap Bill decides to remain with his son on the ship of his own free will. Will and Elizabeth spend their "last day" together on a beach and she promises she will wait for him and keep his heart safe. After discovering that Barbossa has made off with the Black Pearl, Jack sails off in a dinghy. Barbossa attempts to show the crew where the Fountain of Youth is on Sao Feng's charts, but he discovers a large chunk has been removed from the charts by Jack himself. Jack, who anticipated Barbossa's actions begins his own voyage to the Fountain of Youth himself.

    Epilogue[]

    Ten years later, Elizabeth and her son reside in Port Royal. The boy sings a pirate song, with Elizabeth following behind. They both stand at the edge of a cliff, looking at the horizon, waiting for the sun to set. Finally, they see a flash of green light as the Flying Dutchman reappears, signifying Will Turner's return from the Land of the Dead.

    • In the film, it is unclear whether Elizabeth's supposed fidelity would allow Will keira knightley pirates of the caribbean at worlds end be with her. Later, the writers, Ted Elliott and Terry Rossio, confirmed that the flash of green light seen at the end is the sign that Will's soul has returned to the world of the living, and that they can live together as a family; with their one day stretched to a lifetime.[1][2] However, this was overruled by the fifth film, Dead Men Tell No Tales, as the prologue to the film, which took place after this epilogue, showed that Will was still under the effect of the curse, and was only freed when the Trident of Poseidon was destroyed by his son.

    Cast[]

    Singing Gallows pirates[]

    • Lawrence Cummings
    • Chris M. Allport
    • Jim Raycroft
    • Robert Hovencamp
    • Geoffrey Alch
    • Ned Wertimer
    • Samela A. Beasom
    • Jessica-Elisabeth
    • Caesar Peters

    Pirates[]

    • Kimo Keoke
    • Rick Mali
    • David Prak
    • Henry T. Yamada
    • Jonathan Limbo
    • Mick Gallagher
    • Shioung Shin Li
    • Huynh Quang
    • Ronnie Cruz
    • Thomas Isao Morinaka
    • Lidet Viravong
    • Ova Saopeng
    • Stuart 'Phoenix' Wong

    Uncredited[]

    Appearances[]

    For character appearances with known portrayers see the "Cast" how to play keys to the castle.

    Individuals[]

     

    Locations[]

    Organizations and groups[]

    Ships[]

    Miscellanea[]

    Promotional[]

    For more promotional images and videos, go to the Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End/Gallery.

    Behind the scenes[]

    Title[]

    The subtitle, At World's End, was decided by visitors to the message boards of Wordplay, the website created by screenwriters Ted Elliott and Terry Rossio. The two proposed titles, World's End and At World's End, were given as the final choices, with a further choice to include or exclude the apostrophe.[3] In 2014, a late production draft was posted on Wordplay Archives, under the title Calypso's Fury. According to Terry Rossio, the title was never in serious contention, simply a working title, until marketing deadlines forced the eventual title to be determined.[4]Uncharted Waters was at one point rumored to be a proposed title.

    Music[]

    Main article: Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End (soundtrack)

    The film's score was composed by Hans Zimmer, and built on established cues while introducing several new ones. Most prominent of these is Hoist the Colours, which repeats in various keira knightley pirates of the caribbean at worlds end throughout the film. An original song, the lyrics were written by Ted Elliott and Terry Rossio, and several lines are sung by characters in the film.

    The soundtrack also includes a new love theme for Elizabeth Swann and William Turner (first heard during the cue "At Wit's End" and more prominently in "One Day"), and oriental-styled music for Sao Feng ("Singapore"). The cue "Parley" was inspired by and based on "Man With the Harmonica" by Ennio Morricone from Once Upon a Time in the West".

    Reprised themes include "The Medallion Calls", "Jack Sparrow", "Davy Jones" and "He's a Pirate".

    Releases[]

    Worldwide release[]

    The film premiered on May 19, 2007 at Disneyland

    Источник: https://pirates.fandom.com/wiki/Pirates_of_the_Caribbean:_At_World%27s_End
    ByVinayak Chakravarty, New Delhi

    Pirates Of The Caribbean: At World’s End
    Cast: Johnny Depp, Orlando Bloom, Keira Knightley, Geoffrey Rush, Chow Yun-Fat
    Direction: Gore Verbinski
    Rating: * * 1/2

    Jack’s back. Literally from the back of the beyond — from the Kracken’s guts where we left him at the end of Pirates 2. And this time, Johnny Depp (as Captain Jack Sparrow) and the gang play out the circus for all of two hours and 45 minutes (that’s the total runtime minus interval, beware), in a scurry to set new box-office records.

    At World’s End ends up as a crazy clutter — crazy enough to drive you at your wit’s end.

    Time for some stocktaking. Pirates 1 rediscovered the word ‘adventure’ for the Hollywood textbook. Pirates 2 was a garbled mess, where the plot was tossed to the high seas. Still, you watched it out of curiosity. With Pirates 3, director Gore Verbinski lurches menacingly towards the same mes(s)merised schlock as 2. This time Verbinski loses grip on his characters.

    The buzz for Disney was clichéd clear: Nothing succeeds like excess. More pirates, more swordplay swagger, more gunpowder punch, more CGI thwacks, more runtime — sex it up any which way. Sadly, in all this, you get less of story.

    ott:10:ht-entertainment_listing-desktop

    OTT

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    Источник: https://www.hindustantimes.com/movie-reviews/review-pirates-of-the-caribbean-at-world-s-end/story-ySCqm9sORpHt3YR4WHZLWI.html

    Review: Pirates Of The Caribbean: At World’s End

    entertainment

    With Pirates 3, director Gore Verbinski lurches menacingly towards the same mes(s)merised schlock as Pirates 2, writes Vinayak Chakravarty.

    Updated on Jun 02, 2007 01:30 PM IST

    None

    Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End

    Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End
    At World's End.jpeg

    "The world used to be a bigger place."

    Genre: Fantasy
    Swashbuckler
    Directed By: Gore Verbinski
    Produced By: Jerry Bruckheimer
    Written By: Ted Elliott
    Terry Rossio
    Based On: Characters
    by Ted Elliott
    Terry Rossio
    Stuart Beattie
    Jay Wolpert
    Pirates of the Caribbean
    by Walt Disney
    Starring: Johnny Depp
    Orlando Bloom
    Keira Knightley
    Stellan Skarsgård
    Bill Nighy
    Chow Yun-fat
    Geoffrey Rush
    Jack Davenport
    Kevin R. McNally
    Jonathan Pryce
    Cinematography: Dariusz Wolski
    Distributed By: Buena Vista Pictures
    Release Date: May 19, 2007 (Disneyland Resort)
    May 25, 2007 (United States)
    Runtime: 168 minutes
    Country: United States
    Language: English
    Budget: $300 million
    Box Office: $961 million
    Franchise: Pirates of the Caribbean
    Prequel: Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest
    Sequel: Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides
    "Cuttlefish! Ay? Let us not, dear friends, forget our dear friends the cuttlefish. flippin' glorious little sausages. Pen them up together and they will devour each other without a second thought. Human nature, in'it? Ooor. fish nature. So yes! We could hold up here, well-provisioned and well-armed, and half of us would be dead within the month! Which seems grim to me any way you slice it! Or! . ahh. as my learned colleague so naively suggests, we can release Calypso, and we can pray that she will be merciful-I rather doubt it. Can we, in fact, pretend that she is anything other than a woman scorned, like which fury Hell hath no? We cannot. Res ipsa loquitur, tabula in naufragio, we are left with but one option. I agree with, and I cannot believe the words are coming out of me mouth . Captain Swann. We must fight!"

    Jack Sparrow

    Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End is a 2007 American epic fantasy swashbuckler film directed by Gore Verbinski, the third installment in the Pirates of the Caribbean film series and the sequel to Dead Man's Chest (2006). It follows Will Turner, Elizabeth Swann, Hector Barbossa, and the crew of the Black Pearl as they seek to rescue Captain Jack Sparrow from Davy Jones' Locker. They then prepare to fight the East India Trading Company, led by Cutler Beckett, who controls Davy Jones and plans to extinguish piracy forever. Walt Disney Pictures released the capital one 360 online cd rates in the United States on May 25, 2007.

    Plot

    Will Turner (Orlando Bloom) and Elizabeth Swann (Keira Knightley) join forces with Capt. Barbossa (Geoffrey Rush) to free Jack Sparrow (Johnny Depp) from Davy Jones' Locker. Meanwhile, the crew of the Flying Dutchman ghost ship wreaks havoc on the Seven Seas. The friends must navigate dangerous waters to confront Chinese pirate Sao Feng (Chow Yun-Fat) and, ultimately, they must choose sides in a battle wherein the pirate life hangs in the balance.

    Why It Rocks

    1. Once again, Gore Werbinski gets another great direction skills.
    2. The final battle is just epic, it just shows how the ships have got vortex and can be considered one of the best scenes in cinema history.
    3. It retains the charm of the two previous films.
    4. Hans Zimmer's score is fantastic enough.
    5. Many funny and memorable scenes. Especially the up-is-down sequence, the negotiation at a shore, and the final battle.
    6. The scene where Lord Cutler Beckett gets killed aboard his ship while walking through it is lengthy but well-executed.
    7. Will becomes smarter in this movie taking inspiration by Jack towards the climax. The same happens with Elizabeth (despite the latter have this change at the beginning).
    8. The worldbuilding is impressive.
    9. The scene where Jack sacrificies his occasion to be immortal to save Will is heartwarming.
    10. Like the previous films, the swashbuckling action scenes is awesome.
    11. Each of our main characters has their own arcs which something good for a entry in the franchise.
    12. It expands upon Davy Jones' backstory and helps to paint the monstruous character in a more sympathetic light.
    13. The ending is unexpected as it even teases a sequel with the mention of the Fountain of Youth.
    14. The new characters are very entertaining and likable, such as Sao Feng, Captain Jocard, and the Hong Kong Pirates.
    15. Once again, the performances of Johnny Depp as Jack Sparrow, Orlando Bloom as Will Turner, Keira Knightley as Elizabeth Swann, Stellan Skarsgård as Bootstrap Bill Turner, Bill Nighy as Davy Jones, Chow Yun-fat as Sao Feng and Geoffrey Rush as Hector Barbossa are great as much.
    16. Memorable quotes, like "Cuttlefish! Ay? Let us not, dear friends, forget our dear friends keira knightley pirates of the caribbean at worlds end cuttlefish.", and "It's just.good business."

    Bad Qualities

    1. Not enough characters development, making it one-dimensional.
    2. Will is annoying in the first half of the movie when he betrays everyone to save himself and Elizabeth without caring about Jack.
    3. Some scary and disturbing moments, like when Davy Jones sadistically suffocates Mr. Mercer to death.
    4. The depiction of Chinese pirates at Singapur can be somewhat racist and offensive for asian viewers.

    Reception

    While Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End received mixed reviews from critics, it was met with positive reviews from audiences and fans alike. It was praised for its performances, direction, musical score, action scenes, humor and special effects, but was criticized for its plot, character development and long running time of 168 minutes. On review aggregation website Rotten Tomatoes the film has an approval rating of 44% based on 228 reviews, with an average rating of 5.46/10. The site's critical consensus reads, "POTC: AWE provides the thrilling action scenes, but mixes in too many characters with too many incomprehensible plot threads". At Metacritic, which assigns a weighted average rating to reviews, the film received an average score of 50 out of 100, based on 36 critics, indicating "mixed or average reviews". Audiences polled by CinemaScore gave the film an average grade of "A–" on an A+ to F scale.

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    Источник: https://greatestmovies.miraheze.org/wiki/Pirates_of_the_Caribbean:_At_World%27s_End
    keira knightley pirates of the caribbean at worlds end

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