movie bad times at the el royale

Not only for the reverberative effects of another original project turning into a sunk cost, but because Bad Times is a worthy, distinctive film. Characters enter the ominous digs in “Bad Times at the El Royale,” but they don't always exit. This is hardly news. As the title suggests. 2018's mystery thriller Bad Times at the El Royale is based on a fading casino hotel on the California-Nevada border. Filming for the movie took place in.

Movie bad times at the el royale -

‘Bad Times at the El Royale’ on HBO: How Does Drew Goddard’s Second Film Stack Up to ‘The Cabin in the Woods’?

It’s fairly likely that you didn’t see Bad Times at the El Royale—which premieres on HBO tonight and is now streaming on HBO Now—when it came out in theaters last fall. I say this because the film, a period neo-noir thriller from director Drew Goddard, was considered a box office flop, grossing only $31 million worldwide, failing to make back its production budget of $32 million. More like bad times for the El Royale, am I right? (Sorry.)

The Bad Times at the El Royale cast boasts plenty of big names, including Jeff Bridges, Cynthia Erivo, Dakota Johnson, Jon Hamm, Cailee Spaeny, Lewis Pullman, and Chris Hemsworth. Each of those actors plays one of seven strangers who, on one fateful night in 1969, all come together at a sketchy hotel on the border of California and Nevada. Reviews were mostly positive—it currently holds a 75 percent rating on Rotten Tomatoes—but the film clocks in at an exhausting two hours and 21 minutes. That runtime may be the norm for superhero films these days, but for other genres, it’s still a big ask.

Perhaps that’s what held this film back from achieving the same cultural impact as Goddard’s first film as a director, 2012’s TheCabin in the Woods. Unlike Bad Times, The Cabin in the Woods was a box office success, making $66 million worldwide, more than doubling its reported budget of $30 million. Most critics loved the film—it holds a 91 percent on Rotten Tomatoes—and more than that, it permeated nerd culture, becoming the film that Reddit and Tumblr insisted you had to go see. It helped, of course, that Goddard’s frequent collaborator, whom he first worked with as a writer on Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Joss Whedon co-wrote the script. It also helped that this was back when we all still like Joss Whedon. And not for nothing, but The Cabin in the Woods is a cool 95 minutes long. It really makes a difference!

Goddard, who also wrote the screenplay for The Martian and World War Z, was slotted to direct the upcoming Marvel film, X-Force, but following the Disney-Fox merger, “Deadpool” creator Rob Liefeld claimed it was unlikely the film would ever happen. Hey, maybe Goddard can use the free time to check out Bad Times on HBO?

Where to stream Bad Times at the El Royale

Источник: https://decider.com/2019/06/01/bad-times-at-the-el-royale-on-hbo/

Bad Times at the El Royale: Measured Pace, Extreme Weirdness Yield Truly Original Film

By Kim Hughes

Rating: A

There’s a point maybe an hour into the sprawling 140-minute running time of noir dramedy Bad Times at the El Royale where you either throw up your hands and walk out or simply surrender, trusting these seven assiduously oddball characters will somehow make sense, their stories converging. As impossible as it may seem to the disgruntled walk-outs, sticking around to the end is deeply rewarding. Bad Times at the El Royale is an absolute blast and utterly original… even as it takes its sweet time to reveal itself.

Jon Hamm: Not who he appears to be…

The film opens with a murder. It’s not exactly a red herring — though there are plenty of those — but the scene takes a very long while to dovetail with the main action. At least we know something sinister is afoot. In short order, four people arrive at a faded Lake Tahoe hotel with the nifty conceit of being split down the middle by the Arizona/California border. If one side is supposed to represent virtue and the other sin, it’s not a theme that is sustained. Lines blur in this movie with disarming regularity.

Anyway, there’s the fidgety priest (Jeff Bridges), the gregarious traveling salesman (Jon Hamm), the doe-eyed singer (Cynthia Erivo) and the brusque hippie (Dakota Johnson). All meet in the lobby where the El Royale’s child-like and apparently sole employee Miles (Lewis Pullman) plows through his spiel about the hotel’s bonkers geography and worn past.

The doors on the assigned guest rooms barely close before the audience is alerted to the fact that no one is who they appear to be, and everyone has a serious problem to solve. The film then splits into chapters hinged on each character, offering back story on what brought them to the hotel.

By the time the long and winding climax unfolds — pivoting on two characters played by Cailee Spaeny and Chris Hemsworth who are introduced via Johnson’s Emily — we know who is who, but how this whole thing turns out is anyone’s guess. Bad Times at the El Royale is a suspense with actual suspense, echoing Pulp Fiction in its compartmentalization (and jet-black humour) but with comparatively higher stakes for the collective.

Indeed, if you didn’t know Drew Goddard was directing, you might guess this was a Wes Anderson adaptation of a Coen Brothers script, executive-produced by Quentin Tarantino. Which is not to say Goddard’s film is derivative. Rather, it’s so out there and so rich in dramatic and visual weirdness that these examples offer clearer cues to what’s in store than Goddard’s own work, which includes The Cabin in the Woods (as director) and The Martian (as screenwriter).

Goddard alongside cinematographer Seamus McGarvey and set decorator Hamish Purdy has done a remarkable job of creating a tilted, almost sepia-toned world where stuffed game and jukeboxes seem at once familiar and illusory. The film is ostensibly set in the 1970s right down to its dial phones and fringed clothing, yet it conjures a timeless netherworld. You half expect someone to pick up the set, shake it, and then have snow fall, as if in a snow-globe. Suffice to say it’s hard to get a hold on anything, so we pay close attention just to stay with the program.

Bad Times at the El Royale has no problem offing key characters but the deaths never feel gratuitous. (Earned maybe? Is that even possible outside the world of villainous superheroes?) The chemistry between Bridges and Erivo, filial not romantic, feels absolutely true, and succeeds in creating empathy for characters clearly not walking the path of righteousness. Well, most aren’t anyway. If there is a more original, angular, discombobulating but straight-up entertaining movie released this year, I’d like to know about it.

Bad Times at the El Royale. Written and directed by Drew Goddard. Starring Jeff Bridges, Cynthia Erivo, Dakota Johnson, Jon Hamm, Cailee Spaeny, Lewis Pullman, and Chris Hemsworth. Opens wide October 12.

ReviewTyana MohamedBad Times at the El Royale, Jon Hamm, Jeff Bridges, Dakota Johnson, Lewis Pullman, Drew Goddard, Quentin Tarantino, Wes Anderson, Joel Coen, Ethan Coen, Pulp Fiction, The Cabin in the Woods, The Martian, Cailee Spaeny, Chris Hemsworth

Источник: https://www.original-cin.ca/posts/2018/10/9/bad-times-at-the-el-royale-measured-pace-extreme-weirdness-yield-truly-original-film

BAD TIMES AT THE EL ROYALE

Drew Goddard is no stranger to turning genre convention on its head. He’s worked on Buffy and Lost, he wrote Cloverfield, and delighted many a horror fan with his directing debut, The Cabin in the Woods. For only his second feature as writer / director, he takes on film noir, cold war paranoia and American social history in a film with the kind of twists that keep you screaming at the screen in surprise.

It’s 1969, ten years after a prologue robbery gone wrong. The El Royale, a Lake Tahoe hotel split right down the middle between Utah and California, has seen its glory days come and go and, where once were glamorous film stars, there are now just four strangers, four American archetypes, each looking for a room. But the night will reveal secrets about these people, secrets as big as the ones the hotel itself is hiding.

One of the many pleasures in checking into the El Royale is how perfectly the rugs beneath your feet get pulled, and how often. With one big reveal happening early on, the surprises to follow continue to work and, thanks to a clever structure where we often see events happening again but from a different character’s perspective, revelations bring real depth to the characters.

No film hotel has looked this good since The Overlook. The attention to every detail is a masterclass in production design and lighting - the California half of the hotel reflecting light and optimism, the Utah side something a little darker.

The cast is great, but both Cynthia Erivo (singing live on the set) and hotel concierge Lewis Pullman steal the show. Jon Ham and Dakota Johnson are superb also, with only Chris Hemsworth providing a slightly off-note performance due partly to a final act turn which is less satisfying than its build up. But when a film is this much fun, that’s a minor gripe.

The Blu-ray is a beauty to behold. Goddard’s decision to use film instead of digital to shoot pays off wonderfully with sumptuous rich colour and texture. There are a few extras - trailers and a stills gallery, plus a so-so ‘making of’ with cast and crew interviews, the most interesting part of which is an examination of the set, revealing how they built the El Royale as a single unit you could walk right through. And of course, Jeff Bridges comes across once again as the nicest man ever.

BAD TIMES AT THE EL ROYALE / CERT: 15 / DIRECTOR & SCREENPLAY: DREW GODDARD / STARRING: JEFF BRIDGES, CYNTHIA ERIVO, DAKOTA JOHNSON, JON HAMM / RELEASE DATE: OUT NOW

Источник: https://www.starburstmagazine.com

Review: Bad Times at the El Royale

Bad Times at the El Royale is misleading from the start, not just in the ways it sets up its cast of intriguing characters and multiple mysteries, but in the title itself. Bad Times will do the opposite, instead presenting you with a good time in this electric neon thriller that delivers a buffet of wonderful performances from each of the seven principle characters. The film is best likened to an Agatha Christie story, if Agatha Christie had stayed up all night marathoning Tarantino films. Seven strangers arrive at the eponymous hotel, a swanky and stylish 60s resort, directly on the border between California and Nevada. Whilst the building toes the line between the two states, the characters each toe the line of good and bad, in a film that explores morality in a fun, popcorn-flick way. The film begins as a slow burn mystery, establishing a tense and fragile relationship between the characters from the outset, before switching into a fast paced action thriller in its second and third act. Director Drew Goddard embraces a stylised aesthetic in his recreation of a 60s America setting, from neon lights and jukebox diners to his music choices of crooning soul tunes and doo wop ballads. The dialogue in this film is snappy and authentic whilst the action sequences are fraught with threat and tension. This isn’t light viewing; a violent undercurrent runs throughout. But the blend of horrific acts with careful black humour creates a film that is enjoyable and fun to watch despite a runtime that, at two and a half hours, begins to outstay its welcome.

The film is best likened to an Agatha Christie story, if Agatha Christie had stayed up all night marathoning Tarantino films

The film’s greatest strength is its array of characters and the talented cast that portrays them. Each of the seven stars offer a unique performance, whilst the Hollywood newcomers of this film more than hold their own with the established heavyweights present. Jeff Bridges, of The Big Lebowski fame, portrays Father Daniel Flynn, an unlikely priest seeking to recall his own troubled past with the hotel. This is one of the best performances of Bridges’ recent career, combining his grizzled voice with an equally grizzled part. Jon Hamm is charismatic as ever as Laramie Sullivan, a slimy vacuum cleaner salesman whose role exhibits a surprising depth. Dakota Fanning is mysterious and intriguing as Emily Summerspring, a character who ought to have been given more screen time – when she does appear, she is one of the most captivating of the cast. Cailee Spaeny is a newcomer in the film, turning in an unsettling and unnerving performance as Boots that heightens the atmosphere of the film. The other newcomer is Lewis Pullman, as Miles, the only employee present at the El Royale. His character evolves delightfully as Bad Times progresses. Pullman’s performance alongside such established names is to be commended as he embodies one of the most sympathetic characters in the film. The two highlights however are Chris Hemsworth and, even more so, Cynthia Erivo, a Broadway actress who brings her powerful singing to the film.

The film’s greatest strength is its array of characters and the talented cast that portrays them

Hemsworth is commonly associated with his eponymous role in Thor– entertaining yet not requiring much more than muscle and comedic timing. His character here – cult leader Billy Lee – could not be more different from Thor, and Hemsworth pulls off this psychopathic charmer in spectacular fashion. His fluid movements to the jukebox sounds and his devilish monologues are a delight to watch as he silences the rest of the cast and owns the screen, becoming the primary focus of the third act. He seems to relish the role, clearly enjoying every second he is onscreen. Billy Lee is one of the most engaging antagonists that has been seen in film recently, both funny and terrifying, charming and unsettling all at once. The other real star of Bad Times is Cynthia Erivo. Erivo brilliantly plays a down-on-her-luck soul singer, who finds herself staying at the hotel overnight. Erivo plays this character subtly against the more bombastic guests at the El Royale, with dignity and a quiet vulnerability equally matching the killers and thieves she finds herself staying with. Erivo also lends her voice to the role, heightening some of the most tense scenes with her singing, demonstrating an incredibly powerful set of lungs. As well as the efforts of the cast, this film is also excellently directed. Drew Goddard excels at scenes with a slow build-up, whilst the colours of the hotel create visually striking imagery.

Billy Lee is one of the most engaging antagonists that has been seen in film recently

However the film is not without issues. Whilst some of the mysteries have satisfying conclusions, not all do, specifically the mystery of the El Royale itself, which is set up without any real resolution. The film also struggles to balance its plethora characters in some scenes, leading you to forget that one of them is even sat there, as they’ve been silent for ten minutes or so. The other gripe is that of the runtime and ending. Despite a runtime that begins to drag out, the ending is so rushed and forced that it garnered a laugh in the showing I was in. Such an out-of-place ending is a real shame, when the film feels so authentic and lovingly made. That ending will linger in the back of your head as you leave the film, despite the overall enjoyment you are sure to have.

VERDICT:
Bad Times at the El Royale, despite the flaws of having to wrap up so many plot threads, overcomes the monumental task of having to tell these seven characters’ stories in a sleek and stylish way, blending violent deeds and American greed in a cocktail of thrilling tension that the El Royale itself would be proud to serve. The energetic and fresh direction bolstered by the performances of the stellar cast results in a film that I can wholeheartedly state is worth your student loan. Go and see it and strap in for the ride, because the twists and turns that shake you throughout the story are what make this a standout film of the year.

Источник: https://www.redbrick.me/review-bad-times-at-the-el-royale/

Bad Times at the El Royale review – overlong oddity from Drew Goddard

The Cabin in the Woods director Drew Goddard’s second feature begins promisingly. In its better moments, this studio oddity is a tense thriller, at its worst, draggy and self-indulgent. Taking place at the tail end of the 60s, it places a group of strangers in a sleazy hotel that sits on the state line between California and Nevada, watching as they begin circling each other. Jeff Bridges is a priest; Jon Hamm a southern salesman; Dakota Johnson surly in sunglasses; the fabulous British stage actress Cynthia Erivo a jobbing soul singer.

Each, inevitably, has a secret. Lily-livered hotel clerk Miles (Lewis Pullman) advises that in California lies warmth, sunshine and a liquor licence, while Nevada holds the promise of “hope and opportunity”.

At two hours 20 minutes, the film is agonisingly long, eagerly cramming in subplots that touch on the Vietnam war, the Manson family, and Hoover’s FBI; these add period detail but feel like digressions. Indeed, Chris Hemsworth is introduced as a shirtless, snake-hipped riff on Charles Manson with just 40 minutes to go.

Источник: https://www.theguardian.com/film/2018/oct/14/bad-times-at-the-el-royale-review

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Six years on from the belated release of The Cabin in the Woods, Drew Goddard returns with his second film as writer/director. A bloody 1960s-set crime yarn centred on the eponymous run-down Lake Tahoe hotel, Bad Times at the El Royale comes armed with quick-draw dialogue, violent stand-offs, Motown cuts, and casual allusions to real-life figures. Starring a juicy ensemble, it’s got a Pulp Fiction vibe to it, even if Goddard doesn’t have as distinctive a voice as Tarantino’s.

After a prologue where a crook stashes a bag of cash under the floorboards in one of the rooms, we fast-forward 10 years. The El Royale has seen better days, but that doesn’t stop a gaggle of guests arriving at the same time: priest Father Daniel Flynn (Jeff Bridges), put-upon singer Darlene Sweet (Cynthia Erivo), garrulous salesman Laramie Seymour Sullivan (Jon Hamm), and the mysterious Emily Summerspring (Dakota Johnson), who signs the register ‘Fuck You’.

Once they’ve checked in with concierge Miles (Lewis Pullman), squabbling over their choice of rooms, Goddard begins to explore exactly why they’re all here. With the first four chapters named after each room number the guests select, we soon learn that just about nobody is who they say they are. Moreover, the hotel itself creaks with secrets, not least because all the rooms are fixed with two-way mirrors and an observation corridor, allowing Miles to film any kinky goings on.

Goddard’s script is such a treasure trove of twists that it might be fairer to resist wading into spoiler territory. That said, the late arrival of Goddard’s Cabin in the Woods star Chris Hemsworth as bare-chested, flaxen-locked cult leader Billy Lee shoves a real stick of dynamite up the third act. Proclaiming “What does God mean to you?” Hemsworth is eminently watchable as a hair-trigger guru in the Charles Manson mould.

Likewise Hamm is enjoyable with his effusive Don Draper-lite character, but it’s the ladies who set the film on fire. Shedding her Fifty Shades of Grey good-girl image, Johnson has a blast as the ruthless Emily, although it’s Erivo (who also stars in Steve McQueen’s upcoming Widows) that really rocks the house. Bad Times at the El Royale may not be a musical, but her rendition of You Can’t Hurry Love and other standards are captivating.

If the film isn’t quite as inventive as the game-changing horror that was Cabin in the Woods (which boasted Joss Whedon as co-scripter), it’s infused with affection and craft. Even if the plot logic doesn’t always hold up, it’s rich on rain-drenched atmosphere as we’re left trying to figure out who’ll be the last woman or man standing.

Find out what else is hitting cinemas soon with our breakdown of the most anticipated upcoming movies of 2018 and beyond. 

  • Release date: October 5, 2018 (US)/October 12, 2018 (UK)
  • Certificate: R (US)/15 (UK)
  • Running time: 140 mins

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Bad Times at the El Royale review: "It's got a Pulp Fiction vibe to it"

Bags of fun. Goddard and his cast have a riot in a thriller that dances to its own beat.

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Источник: https://www.gamesradar.com/uk/bad-times-at-the-el-royale-review/

At the risk of stating the obvious, the main goal of every movie is convincing people to see it. In recent years, some studios have become particularly good at accomplishing this goal, thanks to a couple of hacks: the reliance on previously existing, big-name IP and the creation of cinematic universes, in which buying into one film includes buying into however many other movies exist in the franchise. Movies with original conceits that don’t exist in massive universes, however, still depend on traditional marketing in trying to achieve that main goal. Therein lies a tricky balancing act: The trailers and posters have to tantalize enough and provide enough information about a given film to convince a prospective moviegoer to purchase a ticket, while also keeping the most important developments close to the vest in order to retain the movie’s suspense and quality. Keep things too obscured, no one sees the film; give too much away, no one enjoys the film.

Bad Times at the El Royale, out Friday, is the most prominent recent example of this dilemma. From director Drew Goddard—the writer behind Cloverfield, The Cabin in the Woods (which he also directed), World War Z, and The MartianBad Times is a film with nonlinear plotting and an abundance of twisty turns, exactly the kind of project that’s best viewed with as little pre-information as possible. To that end, the marketing for Bad Times has been cryptic, leading many to ask, “What is this?” and many more to simply fixate on one particular shot of Chris Hemsworth flaunting his objectively impeccable abs. Outside of that shot of #HemsAbs, Bad Times is a difficult sell.

But here’s some reassurance: Despite what its name portends, Bad Times is good. Just as Goddard deconstructed horror tropes with Cabin in the Woods—repackaging horror fans’ propensity for bloodshed and tossing it back in their face with a meta-narrative that was equal parts terrifying and hilarious—Bad Times plays on the genre tropes of pulpy crime thrillers and Quentin Tarantino movies. A group of strangers convene at the El Royale, a formerly prosperous lodge on the California-Nevada border that has fallen on hard times after losing its gambling license, and, as these stories typically go, nobody is whom they claim to be. All of the characters on this fateful night are running away from demons or harboring big secrets, and the characters’ convergence at the El Royale—a hotel that is also not what it seems—breeds chaos, high jinks, and, of course, violence.

The baser thrill of Bad Times is learning who these mysterious strangers—a group that includes a priest (Jeff Bridges), a smarmy vacuum cleaner salesman (Jon Hamm), and a hippie who signs the hotel guest book with “Fuck You” (Dakota Johnson)—actually are while they, often violently, bounce off one another. Given the film’s isolated setting—almost everything takes place in either an El Royale hotel room or its main lobby—Bad Times often feels like a stage play, albeit one that frequently hits rewind so we can revisit scenes from the perspective of other characters to better understand some of their motivations.

The film wouldn’t work without a great cast, and Goddard has an ensemble of talented character actors who bring their A-game, as well as a breakout performance from Cynthia Erivo, a Broadway star making her feature-film debut. The cast is so stacked that there’s blink-and-you’ll-miss-it appearances from Nick Offerman and The Good Place’s Manny Jacinto, who doesn’t evenget a line of dialogue. And of course there’s Hemsworth, playing a Charles Manson–esque cult leader whose selling point to followers is his charisma—and the fact that his shirt is usually completely unbuttoned.

Put simply, Bad Times is worth checking out. It remains to be seen how many people will do that, though.

Bad Times, from 20th Century Fox, is an increasingly rare beast. The 10 highest grossing movies domestically in 2017 were sequels, reboots, remakes, or an extension of a previously established cinematic universe. The same is true so far for 2018, with the only exception being A Quiet Place. This is Hollywood’s new normal, which makes Bad Times feel like a film plucked out of the old model of the ’90s.

The movie industry is currently a recycling factory; Disney, the most successful studio in the world, has simply resorted to remaking its movies, only in a different medium. This fact of moviegoing life has largely been decried by critics and film enthusiasts. “The Hollywood remake backlash is a staple of movie-consumer culture,” The Ringer’s Ben Lindbergh wrote in 2017. “Whenever a studio decides to redo a well-known movie, reaching for what looks like low-hanging fruit, fans of the original — and fans of originals, period — wonder why producers can’t be more creative and leave the classics alone.” But despite the considerable backlash, it’s not hard to see why this shift—toward not just remakes, but sequels and extensions of cinematic universes—has occurred in Hollywood. Batman v. Superman is objectively bad, but made $330 million in the States and over $870 million worldwide. Meanwhile, major studio gambits on original conceits—stray hits like Baby Driver, A Quiet Place, or a Christopher Nolan movie notwithstanding—have failed. Consider 20th Century Fox’s capital-W Weird 2016 flop A Cure for Wellness, or the remarkably unsuccessful adaptation of a European comic, Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets, which was such a financial failure it basically tanked its own company. Critics may bemoan the IP-reliant world we now live in, but no one is speaking out with their wallets, the only thing that matters to studios.

It’s not that all IP-reliant projects are inherently bad and all original concepts are inherently good. For every movie as terrible (albeit entertainingly so) as Venom, there’s a legitimate Best Picture nominee in Black Panther. And just because an idea is original doesn’t mean it’s worthwhile—may we never forget Paramount’s Monster Trucks. But with nearly all of the biggest box office hits in recent years heavily leaning toward preexisting IP, the scales are tipped, and movies like Bad Times are at risk of being swallowed completely. It certainly doesn’t help that Bad Times already faces an uphill climb, entering the box office during the second weekend of smash hits in Venom and A Star Is Born, and opening alongside a presumptive Oscar nominee in Damien Chazelle’s First Man. Bad Times is ideal counterprogramming, and it and movies like it ought to be appreciated as such, but even bolstered by likable actors like Bridges, Hamm, and Hemsworth, the movie might not be able to break out in such a crowded space.

And that’s a shame. Not only for the reverberative effects of another original project turning into a sunk cost, but because Bad Times is a worthy, distinctive film. The guests at the El Royale might be going through hell, but watching the chaos unfurl around them merits a check in, with or without the sweaty #HemsAbs as window dressing.

Источник: https://www.theringer.com/movies/2018/10/11/17961166/bad-times-at-the-el-royale-review
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‘Bad Times at the El Royale’ Film Review: Chris Hemsworth and Jon Hamm on a Dazzling ’70s Night

A mysterious group of strangers. An unusual location, filled with secrets. A flashback structure that reveals unexpected backstories for every major character. “Bad Times at the El Royale” plays a heck of a lot like the TV series “Lost,” and that’s probably not a coincidence: Writer-director Drew Goddard used to write for the show, and he’s filled this new crime thriller with many of the tricks that made “Lost” so great — and many the flaws that made it fall apart by the final season.

The El Royale Hotel is situated on the border of Nevada and California, and it’s a grand old place with lots of quirk and history. It’s the 1970s, and a priest named Father Flynn (Jeff Bridges), a salesman named Laramie (Jon Hamm), a singer named Darlene (Cynthia Erivo, “Widows”) and a drifter who signs the ledger as “F— You” (Dakota Johnson) are all checking in for the evening.

Goddard lets the opening of “Bad Times at the El Royale” run much like a stage play, with witty, conversational dialogue and lots and lots and lots of exposition. He loves his characters, and he clearly loves letting them talk. So it’s amusing to watch as the film undermines everything this introduction tells us about everybody. Each chapter of “Bad Times” focuses on a different characters and explains that they aren’t who they say they are, or what anybody else thinks of them.

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Needless to say, they don’t all spend a quiet evening reading airplane novels and then going to sleep. “Bad Times at the El Royale” is a tale of intrigue, murder, kidnapping, blackmail and many other crimes that can’t be mentioned without spoiling the plot. (Chris Hemsworth is in the movie too, and saying any more than that is also a spoiler.) Half the fun of Goddard’s film is watching how he parcels new information out in visually intriguing and sometimes misleading ways.

The other half is watching the cast take a big juicy bite out of Goddard’s screenplay, which never met a page of dialogue it wasn’t afraid to double. Bridges plays a smiling man of God with dark secrets, and he has a sad story to reveal to Erivo, as a singer afraid of never quite making it, who gets to sing beautifully throughout the entire film. Johnson isn’t the vicious criminal she first appears to be, and the hotel’s sole employee, Miles (Lewis Pullman, “Battle of the Sexes”), is eager to please, eager to confess, and afraid of something truly scarring.

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“Bad Times” may not be Goddard’s directorial debut — that would be the spectacular horror satire “The Cabin in the Woods” — but this is the work of an artist who acts like he’s still trying to prove himself. It’s a tide pool of a motion picture, filled with every kind of colorful life Goddard could think of, as though each denizen of the El Royale just stepped out of a completely different movie, and they all came crashing together over the course of an evening. There isn’t a single shot in the movie, no line of dialogue, that hasn’t been amplified for maximum impact.

It’s spectacularly photographed (by Seamus McGarvey, “The Greatest Showman”), every character is rich, and the soundtrack is spectacular. “Bad Times at the El Royale” is a heck of a lot of fun to watch, but it runs through its bag of tricks too soon. There aren’t enough flashbacks to play consistently through the entire film, so Goddard eventually has to settle down and let only one of the subplots take over the whole show when the final act rolls around.

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And like “Lost,” the mysteries are arguably more appealing than the answers, and there’s a decent chance that the storyline Goddard thinks was the most interesting isn’t actually the one that audience members will have focused on.

“Bad Times at the El Royale” is vibrant motion picture, in a way few films are nowadays. One might even call it indulgent, although “decadent” is probably more accurate. It’s a giant of declaration of love for these characters and every genre they inhabit, warts and all. And although it’s long, melodramatic and messy — there’s one character who’s clearly important, and about whom the movie completely forgets about — it’s nevertheless kind of rapturous to visit. For a while.

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  • Thor - Chris Hemsworth

    "Thor" (2011) 

    The Aussie finally broke out in America by playing Thor, God of Thunder, in the eponymous film. He won the role over, among others, little brother Liam Hemsworth ("The Hunger Games") and Tom Hiddleston, who was promptly hired to play Loki.

    Walt Disney Pictures
  • Cabin in the Woods - Chris Hemsworth

    "The Cabin in the Woods" (2012) 

    Filmed in 2009 and kept on the shelf for three years, "Cabin" was acclaimed by critics and audiences alike for its skillful skewering of horror cliches.

    Lionsgate
  • Avengers - Chris Hemsworth

    "The Avengers" (2012) 

    By far the biggest film of the year, "Avengers" vaunted Hemsworth and the rest of the cast to the top of Hollywood's A-list. Oh, and it just happened to change how studios make movies for the foreseeable future.

    Walt Disney Pictures
  • Huntsman - Chris Hemsworth

    "Snow White and the Huntsman" (2012) 

    Hemsworth continued his 2012 assault with this fantasy film co-starring Kristen Stewart and Charlize Theron. Though the film received mixed reviews, it was a surprise box office success with nearly $400 million worldwide, further establishing Hemsworth as a bona fide star. He and Theron would later return for the 2016 sequel, "The Huntsman: Winter's War," with new castmates Jessica Chastain and Emily Blunt.

    Universal Pictures
  • Red Dawn - Chris Hemsworth

    "Red Dawn" (2012) 

    Yet another 2009 project that was delayed until it could bask in the "Avengers" success, this remake of the 1984 cult classic starred a pre-"Thor" Hemsworth in the role originally played by Patrick Swayze.

    Open Road Films
  • Rush - Chris Hemsworth

    "Rush" (2013) 

    Hemsworth earned some of the best reviews of his career for his portrayal of racing great James Hunt in the story of his rivalry with Niki Lauda (Daniel Bruhl).

    Universal Pictures
  • Thor: The Dark World - Chris Hemsworth

    "Thor: The Dark World" (2013) 

    Thanks to the "Avengers" afterglow, "The Dark World" vastly outperformed its predecessor in the box office with nearly $645 million taken in worldwide. Some critics were also quick to point out the growing chemistry between Hemsworth and co-lead Tom Hiddleston as an important factor in the film's success.

    Walt Disney Pictures
  • Blackhat - Chris Hemsworth

    "Blackhat" (2015) 

    Credit to Hemsworth for trying new things (like playing an expert hacker who happens to look like Chris Hemsworth), but "Blackhat" became, by far, the actor's biggest failure yet and was pulled from theaters after only three weeks.

    Universal Pictures
  • Avengers: Age of Ultron - Chris Hemsworth

    "Avengers: Age of Ultron" (2015) 

    Another hit with audiences, "Age of Ultron" won Hemsworth a People's Choice Award for Favorite Action Movie Actor. However, the actor would later admit it was around this time that he had started to get "a bit bored" of playing Thor.

    Walt Disney Pictures
  • Vacation - Chris Hemsworth

    "Vacation" (2015) 

    Hemsworth took a try at pure comedy for the first time with the remake to the 1983 Chevy Chase classic. Though the movie itself was panned, Hemsworth earned positive notices for his comedy debut.

    Warner Bros. Pictures
  • In the Heart of the Sea - Chris Hemsworth

    "In the Heart of the Sea" (2015)

    For a man who started a career based on how his body looks, give him credit for having the courage to do away with it for a role. To play Owen Chase, a sea captain who was stranded for months at sea, Hemsworth dropped forty pounds by eating only 500 calories a day.

    Warner Bros. Pictures/Instagram
  • Ghostbusters - Chris Hemsworth

    "Ghostbusters" (2016) 

    Hemsworth put his comedy chops back to work by playing opposite some of the best comedians working today: Melissa McCarthy, Kristen Wiig, Kate McKinnon, and Leslie Jones. For playing a dumb-as-a-post secretary in a clever gender trope-reversal, Hemsworth received high marks from several critics.

    Columbia Pictures
  • Thor Ragnarok - Chris Hemsworth

    "Thor: Ragnarok" (2017) 

    Marvel finally realized how to utilize Hemsworth's comedic abilities for his most famous role: hire a comedy director. Under helmer Taika Waititi, Hemsworth (and the film) soared to new heights in the franchise, delivering what many believe to be the best film in the series and one of the best Marvel films overall.

    Walt Disney Pictures
  • Avengers 4 Infinity War Chris Hemsworth

    "Avengers: Infinity War" (2018) 

    Hemsworth follows up on "Ragnarok" with a co-starring role in "Infinity War," one of the most massive outings by any studio in movie history.

    Walt Disney Pictures
  • Bad Times at the El Royale Chris Hemsworth

    "Bad Times at the El Royale" (2018) 

    Hemsworth teamed up again with his director on "The Cabin in the Woods" Drew Goddard for the strange and surreal "Bad Times at the El Royale." Hemsworth starred opposite Jeff Bridges, Dakota Johnson and Jon Hamm. 

    Getty Images
  • Avengers Endgame Thor

    "Avengers: Endgame" (2019)

    Hemsworth returned for the final "Avengers" movie -- which grossed an eye-popping $2.8 billion worldwide -- though his Thor promised to return for one more solo outing.

  • men in black international

    "Men in Black: International" (2019) 

    F. Gary Gray's reboot of the "Men in Black" franchise, starring Hemsworth and Tessa Thompson, failed to launch -- grossing just $80 million domestically on a $110 million budget.

  • Chris Hemsworth in Extraction

    "Extraction" (2020)  

    In an action-packed Netflix film by "Endgame" co-director joe Russo, Hemsworth played a mercenary with a heart of gold.

The God of Thunder has come a long way from his days as an Australian soap star

It didn't take long for Hollywood to realize it had something with Chris Hemsworth, but Australia held on to this star-in-the-making for years. The Wrap takes a look at the short-yet-productive career of the only man who could rival Hugh Jackman for pure Aussie star power.

View In Gallery

Источник: https://www.thewrap.com/bad-times-at-the-el-royale-film-review-chris-hemsworth-jon-hamm-dakota-johnson/

Review: Bad Times at the El Royale

Bad Times at the El Royale is misleading from the start, not just in the ways it sets up its cast of intriguing characters and multiple mysteries, but in the title itself. Bad Times will do the opposite, instead presenting you with a good time in this electric neon thriller that delivers a buffet of wonderful performances from each of the seven principle characters. The film is best likened to an Agatha Christie story, if Agatha Christie had stayed up all night marathoning Tarantino films. Seven strangers arrive at the eponymous hotel, a swanky and stylish 60s resort, directly on the border between California and Nevada. Whilst the building toes the line between the two states, the characters each toe the line of good and bad, in a film that explores morality in a fun, popcorn-flick way. The film begins as a slow burn mystery, establishing a tense and fragile relationship between the characters from the outset, before switching into a fast paced action thriller in its second and third act. Director Drew Goddard embraces a stylised aesthetic in his recreation of a 60s America setting, from neon lights and jukebox diners to his music choices of crooning soul tunes and doo wop ballads. The dialogue in this film is snappy and authentic whilst the action sequences are fraught with threat and tension. This isn’t light viewing; a violent undercurrent runs throughout. But the blend of horrific acts with careful black humour creates a film that is enjoyable and fun to watch despite a runtime that, at two and a half hours, begins to outstay its welcome.

The film is best likened to an Agatha Christie story, if Agatha Christie had stayed up all night marathoning Tarantino films

The film’s greatest strength is its array of characters and the talented cast that portrays them. Each of the seven stars offer a unique performance, whilst the Hollywood newcomers of this film more than hold their own with the established heavyweights present. Jeff Bridges, of The Big Lebowski fame, portrays Father Daniel Flynn, an unlikely priest seeking to recall his own troubled past with the hotel. This is one of the best performances of Bridges’ recent career, combining his grizzled voice with an equally grizzled part. Jon Hamm is charismatic as ever as Laramie Sullivan, a slimy vacuum cleaner salesman whose role exhibits a surprising depth. Dakota Fanning is mysterious and intriguing as Emily Summerspring, a character who ought to have been given more screen time – when she does appear, she is one of the most captivating of the cast. Cailee Spaeny is a newcomer in the film, turning in an unsettling and unnerving performance as Boots that heightens the atmosphere of the film. The other newcomer is Lewis Pullman, as Miles, the only employee present at the El Royale. His character evolves delightfully as Bad Times progresses. Pullman’s performance alongside such established names is to be commended as he embodies one of the most sympathetic characters in the film. The two highlights however are Chris Hemsworth and, even more so, Cynthia Erivo, a Broadway actress who brings her powerful singing to the film.

The film’s greatest strength is its array of characters and the talented cast that portrays them

Hemsworth is commonly associated with his eponymous role in Thor– entertaining yet not requiring much more than muscle and comedic timing. His character here – cult leader Billy Lee – could not be more different from Thor, and Hemsworth pulls off this psychopathic charmer in spectacular fashion. His fluid movements to the jukebox sounds and his devilish monologues are a delight to watch as he silences the rest of the cast and owns the screen, becoming the primary focus of the third act. He seems to relish the role, clearly enjoying every second he is onscreen. Billy Lee is one of the most engaging antagonists that has been seen in film recently, both funny and terrifying, charming and unsettling all at once. The other real star of Bad Times is Cynthia Erivo. Erivo brilliantly plays a down-on-her-luck soul singer, who finds herself staying at the hotel overnight. Erivo plays this character subtly against the more bombastic guests at the El Royale, with dignity and a quiet vulnerability equally matching the killers and thieves she finds herself staying with. Erivo also lends her voice to the role, heightening some of the most tense scenes with her singing, demonstrating an incredibly powerful set of lungs. As well as the efforts of the cast, this film is also excellently directed. Drew Goddard excels at scenes with a slow build-up, whilst the colours of the hotel create visually striking imagery.

Billy Lee is one of the most engaging antagonists that has been seen in film recently

However the film is not without issues. Whilst some of the mysteries have satisfying conclusions, not all do, specifically the mystery of the El Royale itself, which is set up without any real resolution. The film also struggles to balance its plethora characters in some scenes, leading you to forget that one of them is even sat there, as they’ve been silent for ten minutes or so. The other gripe is that of the runtime and ending. Despite a runtime that begins to drag out, the ending is so rushed and forced that it garnered a laugh in the showing I was in. Such an out-of-place ending is a real shame, when the film feels so authentic and lovingly made. That ending will linger in the back of your head as you leave the film, despite the overall enjoyment you are sure to have.

VERDICT:
Bad Times at the El Royale, despite the flaws of having to wrap up so many plot threads, overcomes the monumental task of having to tell these seven characters’ stories in a sleek and stylish way, blending violent deeds and American greed in a cocktail of thrilling tension that the El Royale itself would be proud to serve. The energetic and fresh direction bolstered by the performances of the stellar cast results in a film that I can wholeheartedly state is worth your student loan. Go and see it and strap in for the ride, because the twists and turns that shake you throughout the story are what make this a standout film of the year.

Источник: https://www.redbrick.me/review-bad-times-at-the-el-royale/

The Truth Behind This ‘El Royale' Puzzle Is Hiding In Plain Sight

Major spoilers ahead. There's a lot going on in Bad Times at the El Royale: violence, guns, an apparently kidnapping, a fake Southern accent, a fake priest, a boatload of cash buried under some floorboards, a cult led by a guy who looks like Chris Hemsworth. But mixed in with all of this are the secret tapes in Bad Times at the El Royalethat us viewers don't even get to see.

While El Royale doesn't tell the audience what is on the tapes, there are some clues about their contents. We first learn about the existence of any secret tapes when "Laramie Seymour Sullivan" (Jon Hamm) locates a hidden camera behind a two-way mirror pointing at one of the rooms of the hotel. We also find out that Laramie has been wire-tapping one of the rooms himself, is in the FBI, and is clearly after evidence of something himself.

After Laramie's departure, Father Daniel Flynn (Jeff Bridges) then finds film reels in hotel employee Miles' (Lewis Pullman) room. And he's so interested in what's on them that he steals them and doesn't let anyone know — including his new partner in crime Darlene Sweet (Cynthia Erivo).

When it is revealed by cult leader Billy Lee (Hemsworth) that the "Father" has the tapes, one of his young followers, Boots (Cailee Spaeny), says that she recognizes the man on the film, and it's made clear that he's someone important. Plus, the fact that Father Flynn planed to steal them in the first place — along with his bag of cash — shows that the tapes must have been worth something.

On top of that, there are numerous mentions from Miles about the things he's seen in this hotel and how "management" has had him keep many, many secrets. At the beginning of the movie, we also see photos of El Royale in its heyday on the walls, including celebrities like Marilyn Monroe and the Rat Pack enjoying their time there.

So, to sum up what we have: a hotel that was super popular in the early '60s; interest from a government organization; an important, recognizable man being caught on film in one of the rooms; the film reel being valuable; and a whole lot of secrets. The evidence, and the fact that this movie was set in 1969, point to a politician being caught on camera having an affair and/or doing something sexually explicit, and John F. Kennedy comes to mind in particular.

To be clear, there is no confirmed sex tape of JFK in real life, but it is rumored that he had many extramarital affairs, including one with Monroe, who was pictured as visiting El Royale. And, there was an actual hotel and casino on the border of California and Nevada that El Royale is based on, per The San Francisco Chronicle. It was called Cal-Neva and was frequented by celebrities and the Kennedy family in the '60s. Director Drew Goddard told the publication, "Who knows how true any of the mob stuff and Kennedy rumors are, but it’s titillating to a writer’s imagination."

In 2001 an employee at a re-opened version of the hotel told Salon, "There you see [rooms] 3, 4 and 5. Three was where Marilyn stayed. It had the circular bed, and that's where she got it on with JFK. There's all sorts of catacombs underneath here. When I first started working here I stepped in the wrong place and fell 6 feet through the floor."

This all makes pretty clear that the secret tapes are inspired by Kennedy, but there are some other rumors and reports about the former president that also make him a likely subject. The New York Post reported in a story titled "JFK’s love affair with NYC" that his use of the city's Carlyle Hotel was the stuff of legend:

Kennedy, according to legend, would use the hotel’s warren of underground tunnels to sneak his girlfriends — including Monroe — in and out to avoid detection, leading former bellman Michael O’Connell to famously quip, "Kennedy knew more about the tunnels than I did."

Sounds pretty, El Royale-ish, too, right?

In addition, there is a story about Kennedy and a girlfriend before his marriage, Inga Arvad, who also happened to be a suspected Nazi spy at the time. They once met in a hotel room in South Carolina that had been bugged by the FBI, which was tracking Arvad. The Washington Post reported that "by some accounts" there is a sex tape of the two. Again, this has not been confirmed.

Bad Times at the El Royale purposely doesn't make clear who is on the tape, which makes sense because all the main characters are fictional and it would take viewers out of the story if it did. But still, since much of what happens in the movie is based on real life in the '60s (Darlene's backup singing career, Billy Lee as a Charles Manson-like figure) and Goddard was inspired by the real hotel, it's hardly a stretch to think the tape was meant to be of JFK.

Источник: https://www.bustle.com/p/whats-on-the-tapes-in-bad-times-at-the-el-royale-all-the-clues-point-to-one-famous-politician-12193684

‘Bad Times at the El Royale’ on HBO: How Does Drew Goddard’s Second Film Stack Up to ‘The Cabin in the Woods’?

It’s fairly likely that you didn’t see Bad Times at the El Royale—which premieres on HBO tonight and is now streaming on HBO Now—when it came out in theaters last fall. I say this because the film, a period neo-noir thriller from director Drew Goddard, was considered a box office flop, grossing only $31 million worldwide, failing to make back its production budget of $32 million. More like bad times for the El Royale, am I right? (Sorry.)

The Bad Times at the El Royale cast boasts plenty of big names, including Jeff Bridges, Cynthia Erivo, Dakota Johnson, Jon Hamm, Cailee Spaeny, Lewis Pullman, and Chris Hemsworth. Each of those actors plays one of seven strangers who, on one fateful night in 1969, all come together at a sketchy hotel on the border of California and Nevada. Reviews were mostly positive—it currently holds a 75 percent rating on Rotten Tomatoes—but the film clocks in at an exhausting two hours and 21 minutes. That runtime may be the norm for superhero films these days, but for other genres, it’s still a big ask.

Perhaps that’s what held this film back from achieving the same cultural impact as Goddard’s first film as a director, 2012’s TheCabin in the Woods. Unlike Bad Times, The Cabin in the Woods was a box office success, making $66 million worldwide, more than doubling its reported budget of $30 million. Most critics loved the film—it holds a 91 percent on Rotten Tomatoes—and more than that, it permeated nerd culture, becoming the film that Reddit and Tumblr insisted you had to go see. It helped, of course, that Goddard’s frequent collaborator, whom he first worked with as a writer on Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Joss Whedon co-wrote the script. It also helped that this was back when we all still like Joss Whedon. And not for nothing, but The Cabin in the Woods is a cool 95 minutes long. It really makes a difference!

Goddard, who also wrote the screenplay for The Martian and World War Z, was slotted to direct the upcoming Marvel film, X-Force, but following the Disney-Fox merger, “Deadpool” creator Rob Liefeld claimed it was unlikely the film would ever happen. Hey, maybe Goddard can use the free time to check out Bad Times on HBO?

Where to stream Bad Times at the El Royale

Источник: https://decider.com/2019/06/01/bad-times-at-the-el-royale-on-hbo/

At the risk of stating the obvious, the main goal of every movie is convincing people to see it. In recent years, some studios have become particularly good at accomplishing this goal, thanks to a couple of hacks: the reliance on previously existing, big-name IP and the creation of cinematic universes, in which buying into one film includes buying into however many other movies exist in the franchise. Movies with original conceits that don’t exist in massive universes, however, still depend on traditional marketing in trying to achieve that main goal. Therein lies a tricky balancing act: The trailers and posters have to tantalize enough and provide enough information about a given film to convince a prospective moviegoer to purchase a ticket, while also keeping the most important developments close to the vest in order to retain the movie’s suspense and quality. Keep things too obscured, no one sees the film; give too much away, no one enjoys the film.

Bad Times at the El Royale, out Friday, is the most prominent recent example of this dilemma. From director Drew Goddard—the writer behind Cloverfield, The Cabin in the Woods (which he also directed), World War Z, and The MartianBad Times is a film with nonlinear plotting and an abundance of twisty turns, exactly the kind of project that’s best viewed with as little pre-information as possible. To that end, the marketing for Bad Times has been cryptic, leading many to ask, “What is this?” and many more to simply fixate on one particular shot of Chris Hemsworth flaunting his objectively impeccable abs. Outside of that shot of #HemsAbs, Bad Times is a difficult sell.

But here’s some reassurance: Despite what its name portends, Bad Times is good. Just as Goddard deconstructed horror tropes with Cabin in the Woods—repackaging horror fans’ propensity for bloodshed and tossing it back in their face with a meta-narrative that was equal parts terrifying and hilarious—Bad Times plays on the genre tropes of pulpy crime thrillers and Quentin Tarantino movies. A group of strangers convene at the El Royale, a formerly prosperous lodge on the California-Nevada border that has fallen on hard times after losing its gambling license, and, as these stories typically go, nobody is whom they claim to be. All of the characters on this fateful night are running away from demons or harboring big secrets, and the characters’ convergence at the El Royale—a hotel that is also not what it seems—breeds chaos, high jinks, and, of course, violence.

The baser thrill of Bad Times is learning who these mysterious strangers—a group that includes a priest (Jeff Bridges), a smarmy vacuum cleaner salesman (Jon Hamm), and a hippie who signs the hotel guest book with “Fuck You” (Dakota Johnson)—actually are while they, often violently, bounce off one another. Given the film’s isolated setting—almost everything takes place in either an El Royale hotel room or its main lobby—Bad Times often feels like a stage play, albeit one that frequently hits rewind so we can revisit scenes from the perspective of other characters to better understand some of their motivations.

The film wouldn’t work without a great cast, and Goddard has an ensemble of talented character actors who bring their A-game, as well as a breakout performance from Cynthia Erivo, a Broadway star making her feature-film debut. The cast is so stacked that there’s blink-and-you’ll-miss-it appearances from Nick Offerman and The Good Place’s Manny Jacinto, who doesn’t evenget a line of dialogue. And of course there’s Hemsworth, playing a Charles Manson–esque cult leader whose selling point to followers is his charisma—and the fact that his shirt is usually completely unbuttoned.

Put simply, Bad Times is worth checking out. It remains to be seen how many people will do that, though.

Bad Times, from 20th Century Fox, is an increasingly rare beast. The 10 highest grossing movies domestically in 2017 were sequels, reboots, remakes, or an extension of a previously established cinematic universe. The same is true so far for 2018, with the only exception being A Quiet Place. This is Hollywood’s new normal, which makes Bad Times feel like a film plucked out of the old model of the ’90s.

The movie industry is currently a recycling factory; Disney, the most successful studio in the world, has simply resorted to remaking its movies, only in a different medium. This fact of moviegoing life has largely been decried by critics and film enthusiasts. “The Hollywood remake backlash is a staple of movie-consumer culture,” The Ringer’s Ben Lindbergh wrote in 2017. “Whenever a studio decides to redo a well-known movie, reaching for what looks like low-hanging fruit, fans of the original — and fans of originals, period — wonder why producers can’t be more creative and leave the classics alone.” But despite the considerable backlash, it’s not hard to see why this shift—toward not just remakes, but sequels and extensions of cinematic universes—has occurred in Hollywood. Batman v. Superman is objectively bad, but made $330 million in the States and over $870 million worldwide. Meanwhile, major studio gambits on original conceits—stray hits like Baby Driver, A Quiet Place, or a Christopher Nolan movie notwithstanding—have failed. Consider 20th Century Fox’s capital-W Weird 2016 flop A Cure for Wellness, or the remarkably unsuccessful adaptation of a European comic, Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets, which was such a financial failure it basically tanked its own company. Critics may bemoan the IP-reliant world we now live in, but no one is speaking out with their wallets, the only thing that matters to studios.

It’s not that all IP-reliant projects are inherently bad and all original concepts are inherently good. For every movie as terrible (albeit entertainingly so) as Venom, there’s a legitimate Best Picture nominee in Black Panther. And just because an idea is original doesn’t mean it’s worthwhile—may we never forget Paramount’s Monster Trucks. But with nearly all of the biggest box office hits in recent years heavily leaning toward preexisting IP, the scales are tipped, and movies like Bad Times are at risk of being swallowed completely. It certainly doesn’t help that Bad Times already faces an uphill climb, entering the box office during the second weekend of smash hits in Venom and A Star Is Born, and opening alongside a presumptive Oscar nominee in Damien Chazelle’s First Man. Bad Times is ideal counterprogramming, and it and movies like it ought to be appreciated as such, but even bolstered by likable actors like Bridges, Hamm, and Hemsworth, the movie might not be able to break out in such a crowded space.

And that’s a shame. Not only for the reverberative effects of another original project turning into a sunk cost, but because Bad Times is a worthy, distinctive film. The guests at the El Royale might be going through hell, but watching the chaos unfurl around them merits a check in, with or without the sweaty #HemsAbs as window dressing.

Источник: https://www.theringer.com/movies/2018/10/11/17961166/bad-times-at-the-el-royale-review

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